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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Updated Nutshell...12/02/05 for newbies

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Author Topic: Updated Nutshell...12/02/05 for newbies
Marnie
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(1) The genetic analysis of Bb indicates it has a 60 kDa pyrophosphate dependent PFK (phosphofructokinase) enzyme.

PMID: 12015149 (www.pubmed.com)


(2) The enzyme, PFK, is ``rate limiting'' for glycolysis (using glycogen, not oxygen, to supply energy). And we know Bb is anaerobic - does not need oxygen. It wants/needs sugar.

PMID: 10689623 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 1832860 (www.pubmed.com)


(3) PFK is INhibited by Mg-ATP (et al). (Most ATP is bound to Mg.). Insulin ACTIVATES it.

http://www.geocities.com/doctor_uae/carbohydrates.htm

http://www.mcw.edu/student/mcwsa/files/biochem22.doc

http://www.eimb.relarn.ru/eimb/3nature.htm

www.apjohncancerinstitute.org/newsletter-old2.htm

http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/newsletter/lclnewsvol03-no04-pg2.html

(4) Bb follows the cholesterol/ mevalonate / isoprenoid pathway. It has another enzyme: acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase. Cholesterol is needed to form the myelin sheath, the insulation around our nerves. In MS, this sheath is damaged.
(Rohmer 1999; Kim et al. 2000; Wilding et al. 2000a, b). or

http://proteinscience.org/cgi/content/full/13/3/687

http://www.sbc.su.se/~anna/PhylProM/families_with_members_in_profile/gi1652965.html

http://web.indstate.edu/thcme/mwking/cholesterol.html

http://adams.mgh.harvard.edu/Reeves/workingresearch2.htm

(5) Mg (and statin drugs) INactivate the enzyme 5-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) which then reduces mevalonate, the first step in the cholesterol pathway.

http://www.lef.org/whatshot/2004_11.htm

Neurol India 2003;51:211-214
The above suggests that intracellular Mg levels play a critical role in regaining control of the glycolysis and cholesterol pathways which are impacted by this pathogen.

(6) Cancer doctors at a Romanian hospital found a very ``significant'' drop in Mg levels early on in 2 lyme patients. By restoring their magnesium levels, they were cured of lyme disease. Please note: this was caught early.

http://www.coldcure.com/html/2003-mag-abstracts.pdf

It is on page 79.

It is ``noted'' here:

PMID: 14979639.

And here:

http://www.ad-astra.ro/isi/topic_articles.php?topic_id=IA

Sometimes, but not always, the coldcure website is hard to get into. So, I will post the abstract in its entirety here:

Lyme disease and magnesium deficiency
V. CRISTEA - Department of Immunopathology, Medical Clinic III, "Iuliu Hatieganu"
University of Medicine and Pharmacy, MONICA CRIAN - Department of Immunology,
"Ion Chiricu" Oncological Institute, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
V. CRIAN - ITEM-Paneuro Group. [email protected]@if..c;!ntci,rQ

During the period April 2001 - January 2003, we had under observation two cases, in
which the presence of both IgM and IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi was
serologically confirmed at high titers. In both cases, clinical manifestations were
similar: shivering, fever, headache, articular and right hypochondrium pain, and
objectively - tachycardia and erythema migrans - these elements being important for
the formulation of Lyme disease suspicion.

Humoral tests showed: significantly
increased ESR, leukocytosis with PMN predominance, intensely positive PCR (for B.
Burgdorferi DNA)

and significant magnesium deficiency (1.20 mEq/L, 1.33 mEq/L,
respectively).

A large spectrum of antibiotics with both oral and parenteral
administration has been so far used in the treatment of Lyme borreliosis. Among the
most frequently used are tetracyclines, betalactamides and cephalosporins.

The decision to initiate antibiotic therapy can be difficu1t because in the majority of the
cases acute infection is self-limited. Asymptomatic patients, in whom laboratory
examinations sustain the diagnosis of Lyme disease, should be treated in order to
prevent rnfection dissemination.

Since in the first case antibiotic therapy alone did not
lead to the expected results, magnesium derivatives were also associated. In both
cases, following combined therapy, symptomatology significantly improved at 14
days, and laboratory examinations were restored to normal values after 6-8 weeks -
disappearance of IgM to B. Burgdorferi and significantly increased magnesemia
(1.74 mEq/L, 1.72 mEq/L, respectively)

We believe that in certain diseases, Mg
deficiency can cause a decrease in immune response. The appearance of
recurrences, which are frequently reported in the literature, in spite of adequate
antibiotic therapy, could represent an argument for this.

This is why the use of Mg
derivatrves in therapy can represent an immunostimulating factor. The peculiarities of
the cases are the following:

1. Patients had in addition to fever, articular pain and erythema migrans, Mg
deficiency

2. The supplementation of therapy with Mg derrvatives had an immediate beneficial
effect that was maintained in time.

As a conclusion at this stage, we consider that in the acute phase of Lyme borreliosis
there is a significant Mg consumption and the introduction in therapy of such
preparations is recommended and beneficial.

(7) When Mg levels drop, this impacts the number and ``health'' of our antibodies. Since the Western Blot test measures antibodies, this may be why the testing is inaccurate (assuming it only measures healthy antibodies). The antibody specific to Bb is damaged - the ``fab'' portion.

PMID: 1093189 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 9125579 (www.pubmed.com)

(8) It takes Mg and Ca (calcium) to make completely HEALTHY antibodies.

http://www.mdschoice.com/elements/elements/major_minerals/magnesium.htm

(9) When Mg levels drop, this has a huge impact on the number of free radicals, inflammation, thymus involution, eye damage, bone loss, mitochondrial damage and so on...

PMID: 10615213 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 9558736 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 11781153 (www.pubmed.com)

http://www.mdschoice.com/elements/elements/major_minerals/magnesium.htm

PMID: 10488476 (www.pubmed.com)

J Nutr. 2004 Jan;134(1): 79-85

(10) When Mg levels drop, calcium tries to go into the cells. This triggers TNF alpha - a proinflammatory cytokine and angiotensin II.

PMID: 8390527 (www.pubmed.com)

(11) TNF alpha has many jobs. In fact, it is protective and beneficial.

www.Hopkins-arthritis.som.jhmi.edu/edu/acr2003/ra-treatments.html

www.dscmt.univ.trieste.it/text/curriculum/containerbiblio.htm

PMID: 10092616 (www.pubmed.com)

www.hdlighthouse.org/see/immune/tnf.htm

www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-128a.shtml

www.diabetesincontrol.com/issue166/item1.shtml

http://www.cell-research.com/991/991-syf1.html

PMID: 9195931 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 12522038 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 14704297 (www.pubmed.com)

www.saem.org/download/01kline.pdf

Gastroenterology 2004; 126: 840-848,917-919

www.joimr.org/phorum/read.php?f=2&I=38&t=38

PMID: 8537658 (www.pubmed.com)

PMID: 15958074 (www.pubmed.com)

(12) The antibiotics may modulate the immune system response.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 January; 41 (1): 117-121

PMID: 8331300 (www.pubmed.com)

(13) H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, is a known microbicide - capable of killing many/most pathogens. We actually make H2O2 all the time inside our cells and one of our ``beneficial bacteria'' in our intestine also makes this, but H2O2 is quickly broken down by an enzyme called catalase because it is not healthy for our cells to remain acidic.
Bb is H2O2 ``resistant''.

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=9820

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/418448 (you can join medscape then access)

PMID: 11687735 (www.pubmed.com)

(14) Bb does NOT contain the enzyme catalase.

http://www2.lymenet.org/domino/abstract.nsf/0/da835aef57144e6a0525657d0005cc3e?OpenDocument

(15) In 2001, an Italian by the name of Dr. Valletta, got a U.S. patent titled: Magnesium For Autoimmune. He cured RA, ulcerative colitis and invasive cancer in 6 months using Mg pyrophosphate and sublingual B6.
To read the patent, # 6,248,368 go to our government patent website and type in the number.

(16) We are using a Mg-peroxide solution as an antibacterial agent for clothing. This is also a U.S. patent (# 5,656,037).
To read about it, once again go to our government patent website and type in the number.

(17) Co-infections complicate the healing process, especially the co-infection with the protozoan, babesia. But in the 1970s, in Germany, vets cured neuro babesia in dogs using IV sodium bicarbonate. The dogs were acidotic and responded surprisingly well to an alkaline infusion.

http://www.sodbrennen-welt.de/science/1976/1976_4617.htm

(18) If coinfected with ehrlichiosis = impairment to mount strong immune defense

PMID: 16412057

(19) Which strain of Bb one has encountered may impact the severity.

PMID: 16405291

(20) IL-10 limits potentially damaging CNS inflammation.

PMID: 16419089

(21) IVIG has been used to successfully treat a Bb-babesia infected patient, but the abstract was removed from pubmed. It was # 13680780. This is a very expensive treatment. Once again, please note: to make HEALTHY antibodies (immunoglobulins), we must have enough Mg and Ca.
To read this article, one can go directly to the source:

Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Sep;84(9):E34-E35.

http://www.mdschoice.com/elements/elements/major_minerals/magnesium.htm

(22) Lyme can cause uveitis due to an overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines. It can also cause meningitis.

PMID: 16398326 and PMID: 16396843

(23) Antibiotics deplete vital nutrients and destroy beneficial bacteria which in turn make many nutrients for us. Unfortunately, most doctors do not remind patients that it is vital to restore the beneficial bacteria (take probiotics) when taking antibiotics.
For a graph, go to this website and click on antibiotics:

http://www.thechiropracticvillage.com/id140.htm

http://www.phototour.minneapolis.mn.us/candida/

http://www.probiohealth.com/

Search: ``metagenics probiotics''

Gut 2004;53:694-700,620-622.


(24) Mg is needed as a growth factor for the beneficial bacteria, lactobacilli.

http://www.emdchemicals.com/analytics/Micro_Manual/TEDISdata/prods/1_10660_0500.html


(25) We make hydrogen from acids which react with magnesium/other positive charges. CoQ10 carries hydrogen into the cells. CoQ10 levels are impacted due to the decline of many nutrients, especially B6 and magnesium.

http://www.coursework.info/i/67.html

http://www.msgtruth.org/why.htm

http://www.akins.com/hh/co_q10.htm

Astrophys. J. 589, L29; L89 (2003)

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2001/oct2001_report_coq10_01.html

http://www.globalnutrients.net/NutraceuticalsINDEX.htm

PMID: 11401418 (www.pubmed.com)

http://www.curezone.com/foods/coenzyme_q10.htm

http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james2.htm

www.lef.org/abstracts/codex/coq10_index.htm

http://www.americanlongevity.net/misc/CoQ10_000.php


(26) With a Mg deficiency, this puts persons at risk for cancer. Our NK (natural killer cells) need Mg and Ca to do their job. This is our first line of defense against cancer. The following is no longer able to be linked, but since it was ``cut and paste'' note from a college lecture, I will assume it is ``common knowledge'' for those studying biochemistry:

``Antibody Dependent Killer (K) and Natural Killer (NK) cells (ASCC) kill by extracellular cytotoxicity by binding to a target cell and secreting cytolysins which unidirectionally kill the target cell. Once the target is bound by an NKAR and no NKIR is activated, the cytotoxic reaction occurs. The interaction of cell adhesion molecules between NK and the target cell may tighten the attachment. The first step is a MAGNESIUM DEPENDENT movement of the cytoplasmix organelles (Golgi and granules) of the NK cell to face the target cell. The secretion of the granule contents into the intercellular space is a CALCIUM DEPENDENT step that results in the preferential insertion of perforin pores into the target cell membrane.''

See also:

http://www.mnwelldir.org/docs/immune/immune1.htm

http://www.1stvitality.co.uk/az/magnesium/

www.expage.com/energizeyourlife13


(27) As stated above (4) Bb uses acetyl-CoA (part of the cholesterol pathway). This nutrient is also needed to make the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. When one neurotransmitter is effected, it impacts the others. The body's BALANCE is off. Serotonin (which ultimately converts to melatonin) and dopamine (cells damaged by free radicals) are impacted. This can lead to neuro symptoms (depression, sleep problems) and more than one neurological disease. We need nutrients to make the neurotransmitters and neurohormones.

http://web.indstate.edu/thcme/mwking/nerves.html

http://www.benbest.com/science/anatmind/anatmd10.html

http://www.chemicalbalance.com/part_one_manual.htm

(28) Bb locks onto a heparin receptor. It may be using fibrin to cloak itself and thus avoid detection/destruction. Magnesium may reduce insoluble fibrin.

http://www-heparin.rpi.edu/papers/PDFfiles_2000_present/CarbBased%20Drug%20Discovery.pdf

http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:Ay2HJ8b6iEQJ:medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/%3Frequest%3Dread-response%26doi%3D10.1371/journal.pmed.0020098+Magnesium+may+reduce+insoluble+ fibrin+levels+by+displacing+calcium+in+the+coagulation+process&hl=en

(29) Bb needs CHOLINE! It is taking this nutrient and others from us.

http://www.sbc.su.se/~anna/PhylProM/families_with_members_in_profile/gi1652965.html

http://mic.sgmjournals.org/cgi/reprint/150/2/391

(30) Bb contains a PKC inhibitor. This is a protein kinase C inhibitor. Protein kinase C inhibitors compete with Mg-ATP. PKC inhibitors cause cell death. When the body is exposed to this inhibitor, Mg is dumped quickly.

PMID: 8978084

http://www.biochemj.org/bj/351/0095/3510095.pdf

(32) Bb breaks down carbohydrates into toxic acetate and ethanol. This reduces Ca and additional Mg.

http://www.bact.wisc.edu/Microtextbook/index.php?name=Sections&req=viewarticle&artid=110&page=1
www.emedicine.com/ped/topic2715.htm

(33) H16 is in several chemical formulas that seem to help fight lyme disease such as: acetylcholine, melatonin, warfarin, Rocephin, thiamine (B1 - in Valletta's patent...is part of pyrophosphate), ATP, etc. This is a very odd co-incidence and I wish I understood why 16 hydrogen atoms is so important.

http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/doctrine/dod/fm8-9/3appb.htm

(It may be that H16 in the molecular formulas is related to ``PKC inhibitors''.)

(34) Ron S. Ronimus, Xuewei Liu, Russell S. Roberson, Charles E. McKenna, and Hugh W. Morgan, ``Inhibition of the Active Pyrophosphate-dependent Phosphofructokinases from the Syphilis Pathogen Treponema Pallidum and Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia Burgdorferi Using Bisphosphonates'', Biochem. Pharmacol., Accepted, 2005.

http://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/xuewei/ (see #4)


Bisphosphonates are a family of drugs used to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

http://www.osteoporosis.ca/english/About%20Osteoporosis/Drug%20Treatments/Bisphosphonates/default.asp?s=1

By definition: Bisphosphonates, analogs of a naturally occurring compound, pyrophosphate, that serves to*regulate calcium*, are drugs that prevent bone breakdown.

Bisphosphonates bind permanently to the surfaces of the bones and slow down the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells). This allows the osteoblasts (bone-building cells) to work more effectively.

http://www.osteoporosis.ca/english/About%20Osteoporosis/Drug%20Treatments/Bisphosphonates/default.asp?s=1

Since drug companies cannot market pyrophosphate because it is a naturally occurring compound, they market a very similar man-made drug.

The naturally occurring compound, pyrophosphate, is nothing more than thiamine (B1) and phosphorous.
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/thiamin/

But,

Magnesium is necessary for the conversion of thiamine to its biologically active form, thiamine pyrophosphate.

http://www.farmacopia.net/nutrient_danger.html

Some cell types have H+ pumps which are driven by pyrophosphate.

http://www.uni-konstanz.de/FuF/Bio/research/Arbeitsgruppen/Plattner/Homepage/PDF/Acidocalcisome%20Herpetomonas.pdf

Magnesium pyrophosphate, a known inhibitor of the kinase reaction (M. G. Thomas and J. C.Escalante-Semerena, unpublished results...
http://www.biochem.wisc.edu/rayment/publications/pub_pdfs/100_119/108rayment99_thompson.pdf

(Remember, Bb contains a PKC - protein kinase C inhibitor.)

And,

The active coenzyme form of B-1, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), is necessary for energy production and is essential for the formation of *acetylcholine*, a major neurotransmitter.

http://www.anvaripour.com/b1.html

However, the Rx. bisphosphonates do not come without risk, such as a chance for a serious jaw bone disease, uveitis, and an alteration in the expression of the proteins, TNF alpha and CRP (sources in disagreement). From PERSONAL knowledge, the combination of Humira to reduce TNF alpha AND Foxamax in one person -> MORE TNF alpha and CRP.

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=6844
http://www.lareb.nl/documents/kwb_2002_4_alend.pdf. (and others)

PMID: 9351880

Understanding the molecular basis of adverse effects of bisphosphonate drugs in the treatment of bone diseases
MJ Rogers & K Thompson
University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.

Bisphosphonates are powerful inhibitors of bone resorption and have become blockbuster drugs in the treatment of metabolic bone diseases. Enormous progress has been made over the last few years in understanding exactly how bisphosphonate drugs act at the molecular level. After targeting bone and selective internalisation by osteoclasts, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates potently inhibit FPP synthase. Inhibition of this enzyme disrupts the flux through the mevalonate pathway, the metabolic route required for the intracellular biosynthesis of the isoprenoid lipids that are required for the carboxy-terminal modification (prenylation) of small GTP-binding proteins such as Ras, Rho, Rac and Rabs. This modification is essential for the correct localisation of small GTPases to cell membranes. Prenylated small GTPases act as molecular switches, playing key roles in membrane ruffling, trafficking of vesicles, cytoskeletal organisation and cell survival. Inhibition of FPP synthase by bisphosphonates causes loss of synthesis of FPP and its metabolite GGPP, thereby preventing the prenylation of small GTPases. This results in the accumulation of the unprenylated forms of the proteins, thus disrupting osteoclast function and causing osteoclast apoptosis.
The most significant adverse effect of intravenous bisphosphonate therapy is a `flu-like acute-phase reaction. We have recently demonstrated that this effect appears to be due to inhibition of FPP synthase in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which causes an accumulation of the upstream isoprenoid lipid metabolites IPP and DMAPP. The latter are known to stimulate the Vgamma9Vdelta2 subset of gamma,delta-T cells, causing the release of TNFalpha and IFNgamma. This likely induces release of IL6 and C reactive protein and causes the rapid onset of `flu-like symptoms. Hence, the ability of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates to inhibit the mevalonate pathway explains their well-known, potent inhibitory effects on osteoclasts as well as their transient, adverse effects that have been described clinically.

Endocrine Abstracts (2005) 10 S37

http://www.endocrine-abstracts.org/ea/0010/ea0010s37.htm
(35) The hormone, leptin, also regulates cholesterol:
Within the liver, leptin treatment reduced the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, but it did not change activities of cholesterol 7 -hydroxylase or acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase. These data suggest that leptin regulates biliary lipid metabolism to promote efficient elimination of excess cholesterol stored in adipose tissue.

http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/full/277/37/34117
Fat Hormone Tied to Multiple Sclerosis
Italian Study: Blocking the Hormone Leptin Curbed Similar Disease in Mice
Jan. 12, 2006 -- Blocking the hormone leptin may help prevent or slow multiple sclerosis (MS).

(36) FcRn ameliorates murine Lyme arthritis by preventing the degradation of protective borreliacidal antibodies.

PMID: 16415101

FcRn is a PROTECTIVE protein that transports IgG across the placenta to a fetus and saves IgG from degration in an adult. (IgA is secreted by mom's colostrum.) It takes 2 FcRn molecules to transport one IgG molecule. IgG is ``recycled'' or is suppose to be. FcRn binds IgG at an acidic side and releases it at the basic side. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody we have. FcRn transports IgG in both directions across the epithelial cell barrier. The epithelial barrier is protective. However, some proteins, such as bacterial toxins, are able to breech this barrier and cause disease.

If the transport protein, FcRn, is not bound to the antibody, IgG, it (IgG) is degraded. Individuals who do not have functional FcRn have an over-catabolism of IgG, leading to a much shorter lifespan for the antibody. Some, but very, very few people lack FcRn. These people are usually very vunerable to infections.

FcRn also protects albumin (protein) from degradation. If we had failed to evolve an FcRn, we would require 2 livers the size of our existing liver to keep our albumin concentration normal, and we would need to biosynthesize four times more IgG than we do. Thus it is likely that the overabundance of IgG and ``damaged'' IgG (as seen in Lupus) may be due to too much (or not enough?) FcRn being produced.

But why might this happen?

Well...there is another protein...a calcium sensing protein called calmodulin which binds to FcRn in a calcium dependent and reversible fashion. Magnesium OR calcium can bind to calmodulin, but what happens when calcium binds is entirely different than what happens when magnesium binds to this protein.
Magnesium increases the thermodynamic stability of calmodulin. It appears calcium and magnesium compete for the same sites.

If Mg levels have dropped and if calcium levels have risen, it would appear that the calcium sensing protein, calmodulin, might bind and ``inactivate'' the protective FcRn protein and thus impact the circulating IgG antibodies.
Don't forget...TNF alpha's jobs, one of them, is to rid the body of damaged (fab portion) antibodies. It takes Mg AND Ca to make healthy antibodies.

http://www.bio.davidson.edu/Courses/Immunology/Students/Spring2003/Leese/First%20Page.html

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~bjorker/Protocols/FcRn_sorting.pdf.

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~bjorker/Protocols/Anti-FcRn_mAb_purification.pdf.

http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full/115/12/3440

http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1689937

http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:87FSIC54ZoMJ:www.chnola-research.org/faculty/bdickinson/index.htm+FcRn+&hl=en

http://www.pedresearch.org/cgi/content/abstract/53/2/295

http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/290/2/G352

http://www.andersonlab.com/research.htm

http://www.lupusresearch.org/lru_sum_04.html

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=125858

http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/Pediatrics/faculty_detail.asp?id=1185


PMID: 11206069

PMID: 3651401


Valletta's patent has merit.

Lyme patients have reported several alternative treatments that seem to help. These include ozone or far infrared saunas (nitric oxide and acetylcholine reasons) and Rife or "approved" Ondamed therapy. Others have tried using high doses of Benicar or a Na-Vitamin C protocol. These are not without serious risks and should only be done with a doctor's knowledge.

Be sure to tell your doctor all the supplements/treatments you are taking/doing or thinking of taking/doing!

When the lyme pathogen is destroyed, toxins are released and one experiences a ``herx'' or an increase in symptoms due to the acidic condition.

It is my personal opinion that restoring Mg levels, following the guidelines in Dr. Valletta's U.S. patent titled: Magnesium for Autoimmune would likely be the safest route to go. But TIMING (not necessarily huge doses) of the RIGHT nutrients to restore the balance is critical.

There are many other things that will help on the journey to wellness. These include eating only healthy foods and drinking only healthy beverages - primarily good water. Nothing artificial. Cut back on sugar. Complex carbs are okay and needed. Stevia or Xylitol can substitute for sugar safely. Take probiotics every day with a full glass of water one hour before a meal. Take walks if possible every day for at least 20 minutes. Watch funny movies. Listen to healing music or your favorite upbeat music. Keep learning, keep reading...exercise your mind. Pray and don't hesitate to ask for the prayers from others. Believe you are getting better. BELIEVE. The mind is very, very powerful.

[ 19. February 2006, 10:57 AM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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lymeinhell
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Up to the top!!!

Read up - MAGNESIUM is so crucial to your getting well.

Thanks for bringing this up again Marnie! [Smile]

--------------------
Julie
_ _ ___ _ _
lymeinhell

Blessed are those who expect nothing, for they shall not be disappointed.

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Marnie
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Recent research added.

See #29.

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johnnyb
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Viva Magnesium!!! [Smile]
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treepatrol
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Valletta's patent has merit.


Lyme patients have reported several alternative treatments that seem to help. These include ozone or far infrared saunas (nitric oxide and acetylcholine reasons) and Rife or "approved" Ondamed therapy. Others have tried using high doses of Benicar or a Na-Vitamin C protocol. These are not without serious risks and should only be done with a doctor's knowledge.


Be sure to tell your doctor all the supplements/treatments you are taking/doing or thinking of taking/doing!


When the lyme pathogen is destroyed, toxins are released and one experiences a ``herx'' or an increase in symptoms due to the acidic condition.


It is my personal opinion that restoring Mg levels, following the guidelines in Dr. Valletta's U.S. patent titled: Magnesium for Autoimmune would likely be the safest route to go. But TIMING (not necessarily huge doses) of the RIGHT nutrients to restore the balance is critical.


There are many other things that will help on the journey to wellness. These include eating only healthy foods and drinking only healthy beverages - primarily good water. Nothing artificial.


Cut back on sugar. Complex carbs are okay and needed. Stevia or Xylitol can substitute for sugar safely. Take probiotics every day with a full glass of water one hour before a meal. Take walks if possible every day for at least 20 minutes. Watch funny movies. Listen to healing music or your favorite upbeat music.


Keep learning, keep reading...exercise your mind. Pray and don't hesitate to ask for the prayers from others. Believe you are getting better. BELIEVE. The mind is very, very powerful.


United States Patent: 6,248,368,Inventors: Valletta; Giampiero (No. 188, Via Campidoglio, 03024 Ceprano {FR}, IT)

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Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

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