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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Can proton pump inhibitors actually cause gastritis and heartburn??

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Author Topic: Can proton pump inhibitors actually cause gastritis and heartburn??
Nal
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Ive read a couple articles on this. Ive been on Prilosec or prevacid for over 5 years now. Ironically none of the burning pain or anything started until AFTER I started these!!!

I had my scope a couple months ago which did show gastritis but I was on prevacid 30mg twice daily at the time too!!

Anyone else know about this? Anyone else have articles or something that I can read on this? Thanks a bunch. Im done posting now for a while again. You all have been great but I am sure you are sick of me right now. Im just trying to feel better again and you guys have been the best source of info for me right now! [group hug]

Nancy

[ 08. January 2006, 12:42 AM: Message edited by: Nal ]

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

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Nal
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bump

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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Nal
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I quit taking them as of yesterday. Anyone out there have any info on this at all that you are willing to share? I realize its the weekend too so ill bump this up once more tomorrow.

Nancy

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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Areneli
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Can proton pump inhibitors actually cause gastritis and heartburn??


>>>I very much doubt it<<<

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lymeloco
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by Ronald Hoffman, M.D.

Baby boomers use a lot of antacids to deal with many different types of GI problems. The old-fashioned Rolaids commercials with the "drip-drip-drip" and the claim that it "consumes forty times its weight in excess stomach acid" is our model solution for any GI problem. It's a model that has successfully sold billions of dollars of over-the-counter antacids. Now, baby boomers who fear osteoporosis are exhorted to take Tums, giving new life to the old remedy. Now, powerful acid blockers are available over the counter that were formerly obtained only by prescription.

The fact is, however, that most upset stomachs are caused not by too much stomach acid but by the wrong food or too much food. If the culprit is identified or destructive eating patterns are changed, the problem can virtually always be corrected without antacids.

The other problem with using antacids for an upset stomach is that they don't work. "What?!" you say. "I can tell the difference after I take it!" Actually, unless you have an ulcer, this is probably a placebo effect. Antacids were clinically proven ineffective by a Swedish study in 1986. In fact, antacids will sometimes cause your stomach to produce more acid -- a condition called acid rebound, which worsens your GI problem. Also, antacids change the pH environment of the gut, potentially causing an imbalance of friendly flora and putting you at risk for infection by the unfriendly types. Some believe that antacids may even help set the stage for infection with Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes ulcers.

Overeating
We are a nation of overeaters. "All you can eat" dinners and smorgasbords were the dining rage of middle America as we grew up, and they typify the erroneous philosophy that more is better. Even in our supposedly health-conscious age, statistics have shown that our average yearly food intake actually increased during a recent ten-year period. Overeating leads to a host of GI problems: abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, hemorrhoids, and overnutrition. How many of us have not suffered from one or more of these consequences at some point when we've overindulged on that special occasion? Many of us should ask ourselves whether we are overindulging regularly and experiencing these symptoms all the time. If you combine chronic overeating with your food allergies, you can imagine why you're miserable!

In the absence of purging or bulimia, obesity is the most obvious complication of overeating. Commercial weight-loss programs are a billion-dollar industry in this country. An estimated 34 million Americans aged 20 to 75 weigh more than the recommended figures for their age and height -- a startling 26 percent! Of these, a high percentage are food addicts. According to medical experts, an increase of just 20 percent over ideal body weight is considered a bona fide health hazard.

Chemical Ills: Caffeine, Alcohol, and Smoking
In addition to eating too much, Americans bombard their systems with nonfoods that are nothing but pure mood-changers.

Caffeine: Some people pour huge amounts of caffeine into their GI tracts. Caffeine is highly addictive stuff, with distinct physiological withdrawal symptoms, including headaches. Besides coffee and tea, many popular soft drinks have a high caffeine content. Other sources of hidden caffeine are chocolate and cocoa products, pain relievers like Anacin and Excedrin, and many over-the-counter cold remedies. (Make sure you read the ingredients on the labels!)

As a drug, caffeine stimulates gastric secretions, thereby increasing appetite. It also overstimulates the normal rhythmic contractions of the bowels, causes malabsorption of nutrients -- especially calcium and magnesium -- and blocks prostaglandin production.

In addition to caffeine, the oils contained in coffee -- even decaffeinated coffee -- can have powerful effects on the digestive tract, acting to increase acid production in the stomach. This can contribute to a host of GI problems, including ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome, also known as spastic colon. People vary widely in their tolerance for caffeine. Some can drink two or three cups a day with no ill effects; others would be well advised to swear off it completely.

A word of caution about quitting caffeine: taper it off slowly over several days. Gradually switch from caffeinated to decaffeinated beverages. Cut the caffeine beverages back one-half cup a day, replacing them with decaffeinated. (If you drink three cups of coffee every day, go to two and a half cups the next day, then two cups, then a cup and a half, etc.) If you start to get headaches, taper it even more slowly.

Alcohol: Although alcohol can deliver some health benefits in small quantities, in excess it acts as a dangerous toxin in the human body. Excess alcohol can inflame the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and intestine; it can sterilize the gut by killing bacteria and normal intestinal flora, leading to indigestion and diarrhea. Alcohol also impairs digestion by reducing stomach acid and digestive enzymes. Because it contains calories, alcohol consumed at high levels can act as an appetite suppressant, though generally it relaxes you and promotes appetite. Finally, excess alcohol use leads to nutritional deficits as well: it is the number-one cause of malnutrition in otherwise healthy people.

If you have digestive difficulties that may be related to alcohol use, try cutting back and see whether there's improvement. If you're unable to cut back or stop drinking, consult your physician and/or Alcoholics Anonymous.

Cigarettes: Cigarette smoke contains over 150 poisonous gases, one of which is nicotine -- a very powerful stimulant that is highly addictive. Why mention cigarettes here? Because smoking contributes to indigestion or heartburn by increasing the amount of acid produced in the stomach and decreasing the amount of bicarbonate produced by the pancreas. This bicarbonate is essential to neutralize stomach acid. Consequently, smokers are more prone to gastric and duodenal ulcers than are nonsmokers. Smoking also accelerates gastric emptying and intestinal motility.

An Unsettled Age
The factors outlined above are the major causes of gastrointestinal distress for the healthy individual. It is possible to completely eradicate most GI complaints by avoiding cigarettes and excess coffee or alcohol, improving the diet, reducing the amount of food eaten, and stopping the use of antacids. There are some additional remedies for the common gastrointestinal symptoms, including indigestion, constipation, diarrhea, and flatulence.

Indigestion
~ Aloe Vera and bismuth (the active ingredient in Pepto-Bismol). This is helpful for indigestion and reflux.

~ Supplemental hydrochloric acid, generally in the form of betaine hydrochloride. Paradoxically, heartburn and reflux are sometimes caused by insufficient production of hydrochloric acid.

~ Staying vertical and not lying down for one to one and a half hours after meals.

~ DGL, deglycerrhizinated licorice, acts as a natural antiinflammatory.

Constipation
~ Herbal treatments. For occasional relief of constipation, take a tablespoon of goldenseal, buckthorn bark, flaxseed, or linseed in a glass of water. (But be careful -- certain herbal laxatives can be habit-forming, too!)

~ Prunes (the old standby) or Rhubarb. Fresh rhubarb stalks work wonders for constipation.

~ Colonics. Enemas have been used since ancient times as a cure for constipation. Colonics are thorough enemas that gently cleanse the entire colon.

~ Magnesium can be helpful in two ways. It restores tone to the muscles of the digestive tract, taking them out of spasm and enhancing peristalsis, which is the natural pulse that moves food through the intestine. It also acts as a natural laxative by pulling water into the intestine, in addition to its physical effect. The standard remedy, Milk of Magnesia, is magnesium hydroxide, but I prefer magnesium citrate. In very heavy doses, magnesium citrate is a physic -- a powerful laxative -- but in moderate doses can gently aid the digestive process.

Recommended Dosage: 150 mg two or three times daily. (Caution should be exercised by the elderly or those with diminished kidney function as revealed on a standard blood test.)

Diarrhea
~ Rule out infection. If your diarrhea won't go away after a few days, you should consult a doctor and rule out a parasitic or bacterial infection, or an inflammatory condition like ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease.

~ Avoid laxative foods. These include foods like raw salads, most dairy products (except yogurt), raw vegetables and fruits, beans, fruit and vegetable juices, caffeine, and carbonated beverages.

~ Eat the "BRAT diet." Bananas, rice (white), applesauce, and tea (herbal, especially chamomile) -- this food list is often recommended by pediatricians for children with diarrhea.

~ Eat yogurt with live culture of acidophilus or bifido, or take acidophilus supplements. (Flavor yogurt with cinnamon or vanilla rather than eating the highly sweetened fruit flavors.)

~ Eat cooler, lukewarm (not cold) foods. Heat speeds up the movement of food through the intestine.

~ Use natural medications. Certain natural clays can help absorb toxins from bacterial overgrowth and also firm up the stool. Bentonite is one of these, and so is kaolin, which is found in the over-the-counter remedy Kaopectate (which also contains pectin, a soft fiber.) These are not toxic. If you look at them under a microscope, you'll see particles that look like little golf balls with dimples, which are sites that attract the diarrhea-causing endotoxins produced by bacteria in the intestine.

~ Take a bismuth compound. Pepto-Bismol is a good over-the-counter remedy that contains both bismuth and pepsin. You can also ask your doctor for a prescription-only pure bismuth citrate. I often prescribe a compound called "B and B": a mixture of bentonite and bismuth.

~ Avoid antimotility drugs. Drugs like Lomotil, Imodium, and some others work by paralyzing the nerve endings in the bowel to slow intestinal transit time, but they do not remove the diarrhea-causing toxins and can actually cause them to linger.

Make sure to see a doctor if your diarrhea won't go away after a few days. Infants, the very elderly, and the immunosuppressed should be seen right away.

Flatulence
The present vogue for high-fiber, whole-grain vegetarian dishes is generally all to the good, but it can have an annoying side effect. Here are some tips to avoid flatulence:

Food Combining: Avoid mixing sugar, fruit, or fruit juice with starches. The resulting mix can ferment in your gut, causing flatulence and bloating. Dishes to avoid: sweetened granola with fruit, sweetened oatmeal with raisins, fruit pies, fruit muffins, "low-fat" cookies sweetened with fruit juice.

Activated Charcoal: Tablets of activated charcoal are effective in relieving gas, and the charcoal is not absorbed by your system. (It will also combine with vitamins and medications, so use your judgment.)

Digestive Enzymes: Beano is one well-known product that contains a digestive enzyme prepared from Aspergillus, a natural vegetarian source. Some people are allergic to Aspergillus, a fungus related to Candida, and people who have Candida infections would be advised against using it. But it's generally helpful for people who have difficulty digesting carbohydrates. Another option is to use a product containing pancreatic enzymes from extract of bovine or pork pancreas, although these may be less appealing to strict vegetarians.

Chew Slowly: Chew your food as slowly and as many times as you can.

Eliminate Sorbitol: Dietetic candies and gum can contain sorbitol which can't be digested and causes gas.

Eliminate Milk Products: Except for yogurt and certain cheeses many people are unable to digest milk, a condition called lactose intolerance. Are you one of them? Try eliminating milk and milk products from your diet for a week, and see if your symptoms are alleviated. Try Lactaid milk as an alternative.

Dr. Ronald Hoffman is Medical Director of the Hoffman Center in New York City and host of Health Talk, a syndicated radio program heard weeknights in New York on WOR (710 AM) from 9:00 to 10:00 pm, Saturdays noon to 2:00 pm. He is author of several books, including Intelligent Medicine (Fireside, 1997). Dr. Hoffman's website contains useful health information.

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lymeloco
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Bug mutates into medical mystery
Antibiotics, heartburn drugs suspected

* washingtonpost.com


By Rob Stein

Updated: 2:25 a.m. ET Dec. 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - First came stomach cramps, which left Christina Shultz doubled over and weeping in pain. Then came nausea and fatigue -- so overwhelming she couldn't get out of bed for days. Just when she thought things couldn't get worse, the nastiest diarrhea of her life hit -- repeatedly forcing her into the hospital.

Doctors finally discovered that the 35-year-old Hilliard, Ohio, woman had an intestinal bug that used to be found almost exclusively among older, sicker patients in hospitals and was usually easily cured with a dose of antibiotics. But after months of treatment, Shultz is still incapacitated.

"It's been a nightmare," said Shultz, a mother of two young children. "I just want my life back."

Shultz is one of a growing number of young, otherwise healthy Americans who are being stricken by the bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile -- or C. diff -- which appears to be spreading rapidly around the country and causing unusually severe, sometimes fatal illness.

That is raising alarm among health officials, who are concerned that many cases may be misdiagnosed and are puzzled as to what is causing the microbe to become so much more common and dangerous.

"It's a new phenomenon. It's just emerging," said L. Clifford McDonald of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. "We're very concerned. We know it's happening, but we're really not sure why it's happening or where this is going."

Antibiotics to blame?
It may, however, be the latest example of a common, relatively benign bug that has mutated because of the overuse of antibiotics.

"This may well be another consequence of our use of antibiotics," said John G. Bartlett, an infectious-disease expert at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "It's another example of an organism that all of a sudden has gotten a lot meaner and nastier."

In addition, new evidence released last week suggests that the enormous popularity of powerful new heartburn drugs may also be playing a role.

The antibiotics Flagyl (metronidazole) and vancomycin still cure many patients, but others develop stubborn infections like Shultz's that take over their lives. Some resort to having their colon removed to end the debilitating diarrhea. A small but disturbingly high number have died, including an otherwise healthy pregnant woman who succumbed earlier this year in Pennsylvania after miscarrying twins.

The infection usually hits people who are taking antibiotics for other reasons, but a handful of cases have been reported among people who were taking nothing, another unexpected and troubling turn in the germ's behavior.

The infection has long been common in hospital patients taking antibiotics. As the drugs kill off other bacteria in the digestive system, the C. diff microbe can proliferate. It spreads easily through contact with contaminated people, clothing or surfaces.

Infections double
There are no national statistics, but the number of infections in hospitals appears to have doubled from 2000 to 2003 and there may be as many as 500,000 cases each year, McDonald said. Other estimates put the number in the millions.

The emerging problem first gained attention when unusually large and serious outbreaks began turning up in other countries. In Canada, for example, Quebec health officials reported last year that perhaps 200 patients died in an outbreak involving at least 10 hospitals. Similar outbreaks were reported in England and the Netherlands.

After the CDC began receiving reports of severe cases among hospital patients in the United States -- and in people who had never, or just briefly, been hospitalized -- it launched an investigation.

In the Dec. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the CDC reported that an analysis of 187 C. diff samples found that the unusually dangerous strain that caused the Quebec cases was also involved in outbreaks at eight health care facilities in Georgia, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon and Pennsylvania.

"This strain has somehow been able to get into hospitals widely distributed across the United States," said Dale N. Gerding of Loyola University in Chicago, who helped conduct the analysis. "We're not sure how."

But scientists do have a few clues. The dangerous strain has mutated to become resistant to a class of frequently used antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. That means anyone taking those antibiotics for other reasons would be particularly prone to contract C. diff .

"Because this strain is resistant, it can take advantage of that situation and establish itself in the gut," Gerding said.

Experts said the resistant germ's proliferation offers the latest reason why people should use antibiotics only when necessary, to reduce both their risk for C. diff and the chances that other microbes will mutate into more dangerous forms.

"That's one theory for what's happening here," said J. Thomas Lamont of Harvard Medical School. "If we reduce the number and amount of antibiotics given for trivial infections like colds and stuffy noses, we'd all be a lot better off."

Overuse of antibiotics can make germs more dangerous by killing off susceptible strains, leaving behind those that by chance have mutated to become less vulnerable to the drugs. The resistant strains then become dominant.

High toxin levels
In addition to being resistant, the dangerous C. diff strain also produces far higher levels of two toxins than do other strains, as well as a third, previously unknown toxin. That would explain why it makes people so much sicker and is more likely to kill. In Quebec, C. diff killed 6.9 percent of patients -- which is much higher than the disease's usual mortality rate -- and was a factor in more than 400 deaths.

Adding to the alarm is evidence that the infection is occurring outside of hospitals. When the CDC began looking for such cases earlier this year, investigators quickly identified 33 cases in New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio and Pennsylvania, including 23 people who had never been in the hospital and 10 women who had been hospitalized only briefly to deliver a baby, the agency reported this month. Eight of the patients had never taken antibiotics.

"This is the first time we've started to see this not only in people who have never been in the hospital but also in those who are otherwise perfectly healthy and have not even taken antibiotics," McDonald said.

"It's probably going on everywhere," he said.

It remains unclear whether the cases occurring outside the hospital are being caused by the same dangerous strain.

"We don't really know what's going on here," McDonald said. "We know it's changing in some ways; we know it's changing the kinds of patients it's attacking, and we know it's causing more severe disease. But we don't know exactly why."

Canadian researchers, however, have found one possible culprit: popular new heartburn drugs. Patients taking proton pump inhibitors, such as Prilosec and Prevacid, are almost three times as likely to be diagnosed with C-diff , the McGill University researchers reported in the Dec. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. And those taking another type called H2-receptor antagonists, such as Pepcid and Zantac, are twice as likely. By suppressing stomach acid, the drugs may inadvertently help the bug, the researchers said.

Whatever the cause, the infection often resists standard treatment. That is what happened to Shultz, who had been taking antibiotics to help clear up her acne when C. diff hit in June. Because the bacterium can hibernate in protective spores, patients can be prone to recurrences. It can take multiple rounds of antibiotics -- or sometimes infusions of antibodies or ingesting competing organisms such as yeast or the bacteria found in yogurt -- to finally cure them.

"I'm trying to stay positive," Shultz said. "People tell me it does go away and I will get rid of it someday. I'm looking forward to getting my life back, but I'm not convinced I'll ever be normal again."

2005 The Washington Post Company

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Nal
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Frightening articles, but they make sense!! When I started the acid blockers 5 years ago (yes, I have been on them for 5 years--proton pump inhibitors), I started getting the gut pain about 3 months later. What was their solution? Add more PPI of course!! Eventually my stomach did die down again (after increasing the meds over and over again). this past April it all started again.

I quit taking the PPI yesterday. Im a little scared though!! I burn so bad today its just awful!! Hopefully from withdrawl only?

Nancy

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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notime2work
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Nancy,

I was told by a gastro doc several years ago that quitting the PPI's all at once can cause a rebound effect. He advised tapering off slowly to avoid this problem.

Also, when I was taking them, I had 2 severe gallbladder-like attacks. The tests did not show any gallstones or sludge, but the attacks were extremely painful. My research showed that I was not digesting the food properly, because I didn't have enough stomach acid to do the job. Haven't had one since I discontinued the meds.

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Nal
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Yes, I will gradually come off it-thanks.

Nancy

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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WildCondor
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Speaking from experience with all the PPI's out there, I honestly think they do make things worse! It cant be normal or natural to shut off the pumps that control acid in your stomach, it can make infection harder to destroy, things like c.diff. evil nasties. I tried all of them and they all take forever to even make a tiny dent, and then end up causing nausea, the very thing they are supposed to prevent.
Pepto bismol works better IMHO.

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Marnie
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http://www.mercola.com/2002/feb/6/acid_production.htm

http://www.nbc5.com/health/5586038/detail.html?rss=chi&psp=health

But...

Susceptibility of motile and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi to ranitidine bismuth citrate.

Brorson O, Brorson SH.

Department of Microbiology, Vestfold Sentralsykehus, Tonsberg, Norway.

Gastrointestinal symptoms accompanying Lyme disease have not been considered in the treatment of Lyme patients yet. Here we examine the effect of ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) on motile and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi in vitro, to determine whether it could cure this bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

When motile forms of B. burgdorferi were exposed to RBC for 1 week at 37 degrees C, the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) was > 64 mg/ml. At 30 degrees C, the MBC was > 256 mg/ml. When the incubation lasted for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C, the MBC dropped to > 2 mg/ml. Bismuth aggregates were present on the surface of B. burgdorferi when RBC > or = MBC, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

Cystic forms of B. burgdorferi, exposed to RBC for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C, were examined by cultivation in BSK-H medium (Sigma B3528). They were stained with acridine orange (pH 6.4, pH 7.4) and studied by TEM. The MBC for RBC for young cystic forms (1 day old) and old cysts (8 months old) was estimated to be > 0.125 mg/ml and > 2 mg/ml, respectively.

Bismuth aggregates were attached to the cysts and, in some, the pin-shaped aggregates penetrated the cyst wall. The bismuth aggregates also bound strongly to blebs and granules of B. burgdorferi when RBC > or = MBC.

When B. burgdorferi is responsible for gastrointestinal symptoms, bismuth compounds may be candidates for eradication of the bacterium from the gastrointestinal tract.

PMID: 12051564

"TRITEC Tablets contain a complex of ranitidine, trivalent bismuth, and citrate."

http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic2/ranitbc.htm

Bismuth is a very curious mineral...and citrates INactivate PFK. Zantac contains ranitidine.

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lymeout
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Interesting study! About PPI's, I have heard that, while they will stop the overproduction of acid initially, they eventually wipe out too much of the acid, which YOU NEED! The key is acid balance.

Our LLMD, along with the naturopathic remedies, instructed my daughter to avoid most forms of protein after 3:00 PM. Especially avoid meats after this time. The reason is that our body's acid producing mechanism shuts off at this time (I think). Anyway, you need acid to digest protein and you're not producing it.

I don't have a grasp on the science of this (pretty obvious), but we got results from the entire protocol.

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Lydie
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Nal, can you try to monitor your reactions to the types, amounts and timing of foods? We have found that, as Lymout says, eating in the evening can cause problems. I eat dinner at 4 and don't eat again, actually...

Have you tried the allergy elmination diet?

I really think that finding a good alternative doctor for the GI issues is a good idea. Whether they prescribe gastrocrom and L-Glutamine, as they did for my daughter, or something else suited to your situation, an integrative med. MD or naturopath, or a chiropractor/nutritionist, could be very helpful.

I do believe food allergies would be one of the main things to look into. If you can't do the whole diet for a week, try just giving up one or two things, say, wheat and/or dairy, to see what happens. Wheat includes oats (oats are often contaminated by wheat growing nearby), rye, etc. Read labels too. The celiac.com site has a lot of info on this. Some meds contain these ingredients. Try going w/out a few potential food triggers.

We have dealt with MD's in virtually every specialty in mainstream medicine, and, looking back, the GI doctors are the scariest.
You need help and guidance from someone who knows how to rebalance your body and gut.

BTW there is a huge physiological connection between your gut and your mood, in the brain. Serotonin is produced in your gut, I think maybe 95% of it (sorry, I hate to be sloppy with facts). There are books on this- buy one such as "The Brain-Gut Connection" (I'll look up other titles).

One other idea: if you have gastritis, it is possible that your body is not absorbing nutrients, vitamins, minerals properly. Again, a good alternative MD will check. My daughter was anemic, and low in B12 as well as extremely low in Vitamin D. Naturally, these deficiencies also contibute to how you feel.

Please let me know if you try the diet: rice, applesause, carrots from the BRAT diet are all okay. Monitor your reactions to foods by keeping your diet simple and using foods that are as unprocessed as possible, to help identify triggers. These can change and fluctuate too, so rotate foods as well.

My daughter had severe gastritis and a excess acid, and the diet (w/gastrocrom at first) has totally healed her.

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lymeout
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Good advice, Lydie! I couldn't agree more about gastro docs. We were told by one at a leading academic medical center tell us that borrelia was NOT a spirochete!
One more thing we were told is to stop microwaving. I think it was because it destroys the minerals in the food.

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Nal
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quote:
Originally posted by Marnie:
http://www.mercola.com/2002/feb/6/acid_production.htm

http://www.nbc5.com/health/5586038/detail.html?rss=chi&psp=health

But...

Susceptibility of motile and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi to ranitidine bismuth citrate.

Brorson O, Brorson SH.

Department of Microbiology, Vestfold Sentralsykehus, Tonsberg, Norway.

Gastrointestinal symptoms accompanying Lyme disease have not been considered in the treatment of Lyme patients yet. Here we examine the effect of ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) on motile and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi in vitro, to determine whether it could cure this bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

When motile forms of B. burgdorferi were exposed to RBC for 1 week at 37 degrees C, the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) was > 64 mg/ml. At 30 degrees C, the MBC was > 256 mg/ml. When the incubation lasted for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C, the MBC dropped to > 2 mg/ml. Bismuth aggregates were present on the surface of B. burgdorferi when RBC > or = MBC, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

Cystic forms of B. burgdorferi, exposed to RBC for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C, were examined by cultivation in BSK-H medium (Sigma B3528). They were stained with acridine orange (pH 6.4, pH 7.4) and studied by TEM. The MBC for RBC for young cystic forms (1 day old) and old cysts (8 months old) was estimated to be > 0.125 mg/ml and > 2 mg/ml, respectively.

Bismuth aggregates were attached to the cysts and, in some, the pin-shaped aggregates penetrated the cyst wall. The bismuth aggregates also bound strongly to blebs and granules of B. burgdorferi when RBC > or = MBC.

When B. burgdorferi is responsible for gastrointestinal symptoms, bismuth compounds may be candidates for eradication of the bacterium from the gastrointestinal tract.

PMID: 12051564

"TRITEC Tablets contain a complex of ranitidine, trivalent bismuth, and citrate."

http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic2/ranitbc.htm

Bismuth is a very curious mineral...and citrates INactivate PFK. Zantac contains ranitidine.

Thanks for the articles! I was tested through a special stain when I had an endoscope done for borellia and it was negative.

Since being on the PPI's for 5 years now, I truley think that is my problem! Acid rebound gets worse, we increase the PPI's and it just continues onward!!

Stupid GI's, why cant they figure these things out?? Probably because the drug companies are wining and dining them too much! [Mad]

Nancy

--------------------
Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

Posts: 1594 | From Colorado | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
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Autistic kids produce too much stomach acid...known. What IS "Nexium"? It's a form of Mg!

I think autistic children might be missing a beneficial bacteria (there are many strains) that produce a particular vitamin for us...one of the B vits is likely.

OR...they lack the digestive enzymes to do the job.

When suffering with lyme, it maybe nec. to use digestive enzymes to help the stomach break down the food which FEED THE BENEFICIAL BACTERIA and then they, in turn, make nutrients for us.

All enzymes are proteins and as such, need Mg to be formed. (mdschoice website on the functions of Mg). If you don't have ENOUGH Mg for all its jobs...this might be impacting the digestive enzymes negatively.

Perhaps the reverse is true: HIGH stomach acids PROMOTE the growth of the beneficial bacteria...the good guys that keep yeast in balance too because...

"It seems that ``LOW stomach acids REDUCE the level of beneficial intestinal bacteria which is needed for the ABSORPTION of Mg!"

(http://www.ctds.info/5_13_magnesium.html)

The lactobac. friendly bacteria need Mg. esp. Documented.

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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