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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » What kind of Pots/Pans are ok to use?

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Author Topic: What kind of Pots/Pans are ok to use?
tequeslady
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I know teflon is a no-no. Is stainless steel ok? What about cast iron?
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lymex5&counting
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Glass. I switched to all Visions by Corning after

being dx'd with Lyme. It tested well by EDS -

electro dermal screening.

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DamnTics
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Why is teflon a no no? OMG everyday i read this forum i learn a new peice of info that I woudl have never known otherwise
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charlie
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Aluminum is not good I've heard for years. I favor cast iron personally.
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GiGi
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Have you heard on the news recently that people are finally going after the Teflon maker? It is high, high time.

First, I never liked them because an expensive pot or pan is ruined in a second when you have a chip.

If the teflon pot or pan is heated above a certain degree, it releases a substance toxic to living things. We had to fly to the moon to test heat shields? What happened? I feel sorry for that bride who got nothing but teflon in her dowry.

Do not use aluminum or aluminum foil. Aluminum is easily absorbed and a master neurotoxin (in the brain).

Do not use any plastics that come in a variety on rolls - they become extremely toxic when warmed.
The literally contaminate your food.

I try not to use any plastic, or food in any of the wrappers that come from the store, if you microwave. You should have stopped microwaving ten years ago. The Russians "outlawed" them years ago. Microwaves alter the food molecules that your body is not able to recognize as food and won't know what to do with it.

I could not exist without my pressure cookers (stainless steel). I have used them for many years and I can get a meal to the table in minutes preserving many of the nutrients that way.
I finally managed to have three different sizes and I use one or two of them daily.

Many people use glass. I personally don't like that. So I buy the best stainless steel pots and pans that last for a lifetime.

I loved the iron skillet, but don't have one - my kids took it to college and I never saw it again.

Take care.

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tequeslady
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This made me laugh. I'm one of those. That's where I got mine... from my Mom when I went to college (more than a few years ago). [Smile]


quote:
Originally posted by GiGi:

I loved the iron skillet, but don't have one - my kids took it to college and I never saw it again.

Take care.


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tequeslady
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Ok... I'm in searching mode. If you don't mind me asking, what do you consider to be the best stainless steel cookware Gigi?

Just to check... I think I'm getting paranoid here, but don't want to make a mistake. Stainless steel has aluminum in it, but it's still ok?

Thanks.


quote:
Originally posted by GiGi:
So I buy the best stainless steel pots and pans that last for a lifetime.

Take care.


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notime2work
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I've also been reading about this on another forum I frequent. One contributor sent in the link for ScanPan (www.scanpan.com) made by a Danish company that uses a titanium/ceramic coating.

Does anyone have any experience or comments on these? I normally don't have a problem with stainless steel or cast iron, but when I cook eggs I would prefer to use non-stick if possible.

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lymex5&counting
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Gigi,

What do you put leftovers in? I know they are bad to keep. But I keep mine in glass. If I open a plastic container the outgas smell about knocks me over. It makes me sick that I used to cook in those plastic oven bags. They must be one of the worst things to use ever made.


I had pitched all the teflon years ago. I sure

miss that kinda clean up [lick]

At the time I was working with a Nutritionist for

my 1st son. She had told me to buy an iron

skillet and mostly use that and also stainless

steel. But when I started working with my

Naturopath last year he said that all had to go.

That I needed to switch to glass because of the aluminum and other metals?

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groovy2
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Hi Tequeslady--

My vote is to buy the best
pans you can afford---

A women gave me some
--Presto Pride--

Stanless Steel with a copper
layer for better heat transfer-

Its almost Hard to burn anything--

The copper layer distributes
heat more evenly--

The pans looked horiable--
many years of cooking crud--

I put Paint Stripper on it--

oven cleaner works perty
good too --

After I was finished
the pans looked perty good--
Like New--

They have to be 50 years old
and used Every day---

If I cook something and
let it cool down --
I can not get the lid off--

I dont mean just hard to get off--
I cant get it off at All--

So my food gets like- vacume sealed --
At first it was kind of a hassel
but I adjusted to it---

Quickly I saw many advantages--
to the vacume--

When I put it in the fridge when
still worm my food is
vacumed packed --

You dont have to worry about
your food picking up Flavoers-
from the fridge--
or visaversa--

The air in my fridge is
much cleaner when I use
these pans--

The pans have been used on
a eletric stove there whole
50 year life--

The bottoms are still Perfectly
Level -- I am Amazed --

The lady that had them liked
to cook on HI ---

There not Cheap--
But threw your life time--
Just the money you save
from not burning food--
Is worth the price--

I was going to say- if my
house was on fire the
pans would be High on my
list of things to Save--

But after I thought about it-
I realized that the pans
would probely be the Only
thing to Survive---

I bet the pans would be
Really Vacume Sealed---LOL

I have some Corning Ware--
and my Mom swears by it--

But 2 weeks after I got some-
My Room Mates cat caused a
Land Slide and 3 of the
pans Landed on each other--
and broke in many peices---

I have a feeling if the pans
had been used more before
the Land Slide they may not
have broken --

What ever you buy--
Get the best you can afford--Jay--

Ps I found another Presto Pride
pan at a second hand store--
It Looked Like Hello - $3

Also Its a Good Idea to
Always cook with the
Lid on for Safty Reasons--
Lyme Brain --

A couple of years ago--
I started 2 stove fires
in quick secession--

One Looked like the
Towering Inferano-- In A Pan ---

So I got a microwave for awhile--

If you dont have the Lid on
the pan at least have it close
Im glad I did --
-
-
-

[ 28. January 2006, 04:38 AM: Message edited by: groovy2 ]

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GiGi
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Like many of you I lived in total brain bog and burned many a pot when I was sick. A wonder that I never burned the house down.

Having been married 45 years, some of my pots had to go. I am now frequently heading to Marshall's and Ross's where I find great bargains slowly reassembling what I need. I do not care much about the brand, but I look for a heavy bottoms, glass top with little hole, so I can use it as a Dutch Oven also, and n handles only fastened outside, without "buttons" inside. And stainless steel.

Same with my pressure cookers. Stainless steel.
I have managed not to ruin the ones I have and they will last another lifetime. They are made by Fissler and there is a place in Los Angeles that brings them over from Germany. My kids all have one - they are working and it is so easy and quick.

I am not familiar with the ScanPan that Notime mentioned.

There was a time when I was still palladium toxic (from crowns), that almost no metal around me was good. I started to vibrate when I got close to anything metallic - including the stainless steel pots, stove, etc. By the time I finished cooking dinner and was able to sit down, I hardly knew who I was anymore.

That is all gone, and all of you will reach the point soon where all these strange sensations will fade away. Keep doing what you need to do.

Take care.

I store most everything in glass. I buy everything in glass, such as juices, oil, etc. I really try to avoid as much plastic as I can. It's often difficult.

If you think you are slightly plastic toxic (most of us are; Dr. K. finds it in most patients now),
it is easy to dispose of some of it by taking
500 mg of glycine 2-times a day.

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JimBoB
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Are you SURE there is aluminum in stainless steel?
It has been MY understanding that it has Chromium in it, not aluminum.
Where do I find out that there is aluminum in it too?
Jim [Cool]

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JimBoB
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I just googled stainless steel elements and THIS is what I came up with. NO aluminum in stainless steel.
Jim
###

Why is Stainless Steel Stainless?
From Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D.,
Your Guide to Chemistry.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
What It Is and How It Works!
What Is Stainless Steel and Why Is it Stainless?

In 1913, English metallurgist Harry Brearly, working on a project to improve rifle barrels, accidentally discovered that adding chromium to low carbon steel gives it stain resistance. In addition to iron, carbon, and chromium, modern stainless steel may also contain other elements, such as nickel, niobium, molybdenum, and titanium. Nickel, molybdenum, niobium, and chromium enhance the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. It is the addition of a minimum of 12% chromium to the steel that makes it resist rust, or stain 'less' than other types of steel. The chromium in the steel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to form a thin, invisible layer of chrome-containing oxide, called the passive film. The sizes of chromium atoms and their oxides are similar, so they pack neatly together on the surface of the metal, forming a stable layer only a few atoms thick.
Sponsored Links

Stainless Steel SheetStainless sheet in 304, 316, 430 Finish 2B, #3, #4 and #8 Mirrorwww.specialtysteelsupply.com

Medical Wire/Components304/316 SS, Nitinol and PTFE Coated Sizes as small as .003", ISO Reg.www.nepg1.com

Carpenter Stainless SteelCarpenter Technology produces stainless alloys in various forms.www.cartech.com
If the metal is cut or scratched and the passive film is disrupted, more oxide will quickly form and recover the exposed surface, protecting it from oxidative corrosion. (Iron, on the other hand, rusts quickly because atomic iron is much smaller than its oxide, so the oxide forms a loose rather than tightly-packed layer and flakes away.) The passive film requires oxygen to self-repair, so stainless steels have poor corrosion resistance in low-oxygen and poor circulation environments. In seawater, chlorides from the salt will attack and destroy the passive film more quickly than it can be repaired in a low oxygen environment.

Types of Stainless Steel

The three main types of stainless steels are austenitic, ferritic, and martensitic. These three types of steels are identified by their microstructure or predominant crystal phase.

Austenitic:
Austenitic steels have austenite as their primary phase (face centered cubic crystal). These are alloys containing chromium and nickel (sometimes manganese and nitrogen), structured around the Type 302 composition of iron, 18% chromium, and 8% nickel. Austenitic steels are not hardenable by heat treatment. The most familiar stainless steel is probably Type 304, sometimes called T304 or simply 304. Type 304 surgical stainless steel is an austenitic steel containing 18-20% chromium and 8-10% nickel.

Ferritic:
Ferritic steels have ferrite (body centered cubic crystal) as their main phase. These steels contain iron and chromium, based on the Type 430 composition of 17% chromium. Ferritic steel is less ductile than austenitic steel and is not hardenable by heat treatment.

Martensitic:
The characteristic orthorhombic martensite microstructure was first observed by German microscopist Adolf Martens around 1890. Martensitic steels are low carbon steels built around the Type 410 composition of iron, 12% chromium, and 0.12% carbon. They may be tempered and hardened. Martensite gives steel great hardness, but it also reduces its toughness and makes it brittle, so few steels are fully hardened.

There are also other grades of stainless steels, such as precipitation-hardened, duplex, and cast stainless steels. Stainless steel can be produced in a variety of finishes and textures and can be tinted over a broad spectrum of colors.

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tequeslady
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You're right, Jim. I wasn't very clear. However, when I was searching, the vast majority of good stainless steel cookware had aluminum in them somewhere for heat conduction. As I recall, it was usually sandwiched between layers of the chromium/nickel (i.e. stainless steel), but I guess that doesn't hurt anything.


quote:
Originally posted by JimBoB:
I just googled stainless steel elements and THIS is what I came up with. NO aluminum in stainless steel.
Jim
###

Why is Stainless Steel Stainless?
From Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D.,
Your Guide to Chemistry.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
What It Is and How It Works!
What Is Stainless Steel and Why Is it Stainless?

In 1913, English metallurgist Harry Brearly, working on a project to improve rifle barrels, accidentally discovered that adding chromium to low carbon steel gives it stain resistance. In addition to iron, carbon, and chromium, modern stainless steel may also contain other elements, such as nickel, niobium, molybdenum, and titanium. Nickel, molybdenum, niobium, and chromium enhance the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. It is the addition of a minimum of 12% chromium to the steel that makes it resist rust, or stain 'less' than other types of steel. The chromium in the steel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to form a thin, invisible layer of chrome-containing oxide, called the passive film. The sizes of chromium atoms and their oxides are similar, so they pack neatly together on the surface of the metal, forming a stable layer only a few atoms thick.
Sponsored Links

Stainless Steel SheetStainless sheet in 304, 316, 430 Finish 2B, #3, #4 and #8 Mirrorwww.specialtysteelsupply.com

Medical Wire/Components304/316 SS, Nitinol and PTFE Coated Sizes as small as .003", ISO Reg.www.nepg1.com

Carpenter Stainless SteelCarpenter Technology produces stainless alloys in various forms.www.cartech.com
If the metal is cut or scratched and the passive film is disrupted, more oxide will quickly form and recover the exposed surface, protecting it from oxidative corrosion. (Iron, on the other hand, rusts quickly because atomic iron is much smaller than its oxide, so the oxide forms a loose rather than tightly-packed layer and flakes away.) The passive film requires oxygen to self-repair, so stainless steels have poor corrosion resistance in low-oxygen and poor circulation environments. In seawater, chlorides from the salt will attack and destroy the passive film more quickly than it can be repaired in a low oxygen environment.

Types of Stainless Steel

The three main types of stainless steels are austenitic, ferritic, and martensitic. These three types of steels are identified by their microstructure or predominant crystal phase.

Austenitic:
Austenitic steels have austenite as their primary phase (face centered cubic crystal). These are alloys containing chromium and nickel (sometimes manganese and nitrogen), structured around the Type 302 composition of iron, 18% chromium, and 8% nickel. Austenitic steels are not hardenable by heat treatment. The most familiar stainless steel is probably Type 304, sometimes called T304 or simply 304. Type 304 surgical stainless steel is an austenitic steel containing 18-20% chromium and 8-10% nickel.

Ferritic:
Ferritic steels have ferrite (body centered cubic crystal) as their main phase. These steels contain iron and chromium, based on the Type 430 composition of 17% chromium. Ferritic steel is less ductile than austenitic steel and is not hardenable by heat treatment.

Martensitic:
The characteristic orthorhombic martensite microstructure was first observed by German microscopist Adolf Martens around 1890. Martensitic steels are low carbon steels built around the Type 410 composition of iron, 12% chromium, and 0.12% carbon. They may be tempered and hardened. Martensite gives steel great hardness, but it also reduces its toughness and makes it brittle, so few steels are fully hardened.

There are also other grades of stainless steels, such as precipitation-hardened, duplex, and cast stainless steels. Stainless steel can be produced in a variety of finishes and textures and can be tinted over a broad spectrum of colors.



[ 28. January 2006, 11:43 AM: Message edited by: tequeslady ]

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map1131
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This has happened so many times to me in the last year. I start to think about something I need to do that could improve my health. Come here and someone has posted a topic about the very thing I've been thinking about.

Last week I surveyed my pots and pans and realized the teflon had to go. The glass pots and pans had been stored in the back of the cabinet because they were harder to clean. A little more scrubbing there will be. Teflon now stored in the back and glass to the front.

I'm watching the ads for stainless pans so the teflon will go in the garbage.

If you listen to your gut and heart you can be lead in the right direction. Listening has to be learned, it not something most of us do well.

Take care, Pam

--------------------
"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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JimBoB
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Right Tequeslady:
My wife has aluminum pots, but are totally lined in stainless steel.

NOW IF I can somehow just get her to believe that TEFLON is bad for us, and convince her to get rid of her treasured pots and pans lined with Teflon. [bonk]

BIG uphill battle.

Jim. [Cool]

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hatsnscarfs
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I got rid of teflon years ago. I can't stand the smell of it.

I have collected all sorts af pans over the years. Recently I have found great pans for very low prices at discount stores like Marshalls, TJ Max etc. I got a small shiny stainless steel pan, may have been Emeril brand. Perfect for omelets or sauteeing a meal of meat and vegetables. It was under $20. Make sure the pans are heavy.

I've learned to cook without nonstick. I use very little oil or butter. Sometimes it helps to add a little water as things get cooking. This prevents sticking.
hatsnscarfs

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mikken
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For those who aren't convinced of the dangers of teflon -

http://www.ewg.org/reports/toxicteflon/toxictemps.php

"Canaries in the Kitchen"

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HawnSP
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Here is a a good link on cookware.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=25717

Restraunts mostly use aluminum since it heats fast, is cheaper and easier to use(lighter).

Posts: 8 | From St louis North of | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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