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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Lyme Busters Plum Island Could this be True?

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Author Topic: Lyme Busters Plum Island Could this be True?
Trina
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As I was trying to make sense of this extremely puzzling, nonsensical situation, I was sent some information from a very reliable source, which stated that 60% of chronic lyme patients are coinfected with several strains of mycoplasma, the most common one being "mycoplasma fermentens" which is patented by the U.S. Army and army pathologist Dr. Lo!

Lo, Shyh-Ching-Pathogenic mycoplasma-U.S. Patent 5,242,820 issued Sept. 7, 1993.

It is becoming evident that any microbe that has been "modified" is considered "off limits" for treatment and any physician that takes these chronic infections seriously, is targeted for harassment.
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This is just a small section of the posting.

The web site is lyme busters home, then click on lyme busters website,then concpiracy,then living next door to plum Island.

Was There a lot of goverment testing done on Plum Island.And do 60 % of people with lyme have this type of mycoplasma?

It goes on further to describe how this strain of mycoplasma is like Gulf war syndrome ect...Could there be any truth to this at all?

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Trina

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liz28
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Global warming and forest reduction are much better bets. Why do you need a conspiracy, when good old-fashioned Nature produces lethal bacteria on a regular basis? Warmer areas of the global have a great variety of dangerous diseases that do not require Dr. No to develop an ability to cause problems for people.
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Trina
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Visonoftruth,
Were you tested for this one specificaly? If so then those postings really are intresting.

Some people only believe in black and white and I am one of those people who thinks their are a lot of shades in between...

The tic I got bit from was just an ordinary lone star tic...I live a long way from New York.

Just thought the article was intresting...
I do believe their are Dr No's out their otherwise we would not have developed the hydrogen bomb ~

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Trina

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elle
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quote:
Originally posted by Trina:
U.S. Army and army pathologist Dr. Lo!

Lo, Shyh-Ching-Pathogenic mycoplasma-U.S. Patent 5,242,820 issued Sept. 7, 1993.


Was There a lot of goverment testing done on Plum Island.And do 60 % of people with lyme have this type of mycoplasma?

It goes on further to describe how this strain of mycoplasma is like Gulf war syndrome ect...Could there be any truth to this at all?

I think you coulld spend several days of interesting research mulling through the patent office records online.

The patent is real - therefore . .there must be some truth.
How much is unknown. www.uspto.gov

Here is a piece of the patent that your referenced - it is very lengthy. If you go to the website you can search by # or by subject.

elle

United States Patent 5,242,820
Lo September 7, 1993
Pathogenic mycoplasma

Abstract

The invention relates to a novel pathogenic mycoplasma isolated from patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and its use in detecting antibodies in sera of AIDS patients, patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) or patients dying of diseases and symptoms resembling AIDS diseases. The invention further relates to specific DNA sequences, antibodies against the pathogenic mycoplasma, and their use in detecting DNA or antigens of the pathogenic mycoplasma or other genetically and serologically closely related mycoplasmas in infected tissue of patients with AIDS or ARC or patients dying of symptoms resembling AIDS diseases. The invention still further relates to a variety of different forms of vaccine against mycoplasma infection in humans and/or animals.
Inventors: Lo; Shyh-Ching (Potomac, MD)
Assignee: American Registry of Pathology (Washington, DC)
Appl. No.: 710361
Filed: June 6, 1991

Current U.S. Class: 435/252.1 ; 435/5; 435/872
Field of Search: 435/870,5,872,240.2

Other References

Marquart et al (1985) Mycoplasma-Like Structures . . . Eur J Clin Microbiol 4(1):73-74. .
Lo et al (1989) A Novel Virus-like Infectious Agent . . . Am J Trop Med Hyg 40(2):213-226. .
Lo et al (1989) Identification of M Incognitus . . . Am. J. Trop-Med. Hyg 41(5):601-616. .
Lo et al (1989) Association of the Virus-like Agent . . . Am J Trop Med Hyg 41(3):364-376. .
Lo et al (1989) Fatal Infection of Silvered Leaf Monkeys . . . Am. T Trop Med Hyg 40(4):399-409. .
Lo et al (1989) Virus-like Infectious Agent . . . Am J Trop Med Hyg 41(5):586-600. .
Marquart et al (Feb. 1985) Abstract Only Eur J Clin Microbiol 4(1):73-74. .
Hu et al (1990) Gene 93:67-72..

Primary Examiner: Nucker; Christine M.
Assistant Examiner: Preston; D. R.
Attorney, Agent or Firm: Venable, Baetjer, Howard & Civiletti
Government Interests


The invention described herein was made in the course of work under a grant or award from the United States Department of the Army.
Parent Case Text


CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 265,920, filed Nov. 2, 1988, now abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 875,535, filed Jun. 18, 1986, now abandoned.
Claims


What is claimed is:

1. A biologically pure mycoplasma isolated from tissues of patients with AIDS comprising the mycoplasma produced by the cell line ATCC No. CRL 9127.

2. A biologically pure mycoplasma having the identifying characteristics of M. fermentans incognitus, ATCC 53949.

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When I feel blue . . . . . . its time to take another breath

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break the chains
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There is much to learn here. knowing the problem is more than half way to finding the solution.

from the patent:
"O. Other Disease States in Which M. fermentans incognitus Has Been Implicated

In addition to AIDS, M. fermentans incognitus has been implicated in a number of other Disease states including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Wegener's Disease, Sarcoidosis, respiratory distress syndrome, Kikuchi's disease, autoimmune diseases such as Collagen Vascular Disease and Lupus, and chronic debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. M. fermentans incognitus may be either a causative agent of these diseases or a key co-factor in these diseases. "

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Trina
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Check out the biological warfare and at the bottom how it could be spread..hmmm tick, misquito, misquito.. tick..rat... goes something like that.

http://www.telemedicine.org/BioWar/biologic.htm

Did you know that the The United States Weaponized Tularemia (a tic bourne disease) in the 1950 and 1960's?

Now Plum Island just does not seem that far fetched at all..Now I really could go crazy thinking about this stuff [dizzy]

[ 12. June 2006, 06:48 PM: Message edited by: Trina ]

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Trina

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mycoplasma1
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As I said in another post, my Dr. (a very prominent NY LLMD) told me the other day he believes Lyme is the result of Plum Island germ warfare agents. They were experimenting with these diseases and using ticks as vectors. Birds on the island could easily have picked these up and spread them across the country (look at the migratory routes and where Lyme started in the 70's -right across from Plum Island! We also know that the animal waste (from diseased animals) from Plum Island went right into Long Island sound. Accidents at biowarfare facilities are also common (there is a list somewhere on line that is extensive) and these facilities are not airtight.

I am personally working with two well known scientists who have dealt with these agents in the past and am turning their story into a feature film.

Scary stuff.

This is NOT just ticks folks. Also sexually transmitted. I think this is a MAJOR epidemic and Borrelia is just the tip of the iceberg here. Look at Morgellons -now in all 50 states.

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break the chains
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A quote from David Rockefeller's autobiography 'Memoirs'

"For more than a century, ideological extremists at either end of the political spectrum have seized upon well-publicized incidents to attack the Rockefeller family for the inordinate influence they claim we wield over American political and economic institutions. Some even believe we are part of a secret cabal working against the best interests of the United States, characterizing my family and me as 'internationalists' and of conspiring with others around the world to build a more integrated global political and economic structure - one world, if you will.

If that's the charge, I stand guilty, and I am proud of it."

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tequeslady
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Yeah, he's one sick elitist puppy. He was busy traveling this week... the annual Bilderberg meeting in Ottawa, where the 120 most powerful people in the world get together.
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david1097
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A few points if interest...

I think this type of stuff would have been done a fort dietrich MD, not Plum island. Plum is an animal facility, although there are MANY animal diseases that humans can get, the complex in Md. works with human pathogens.

There are know insect releases from plum. What the insects had? I donlt think that anyone really knows or sure.

The patent that is refered too is one that has been cisulating around int he internet for quite some time. There is a guyin canada that refers to it as proof of an engineering organism. Reading the patent, I don;t see the connection, although weaponization efforts HAD been aimed at developing improved dispersion techniques through powders and liquid aerosols and this particular organism may have been one of them.


There has been a lot of talk about gulf war syndrome being the result of a man made weapon. There are guys that have in th past been crawling all over the old bio weapons facilities over there that did so with no protection at all yet do not have gulf war sydrome (although some do have screwed up livers as a result of some exposures).

My off the cuff thought on this is that gulf syndrom is the result of some sort of insect bourne disease that was not well known before. Maybe the loals had a certain level of built up resistance like some people that live in certain malaria prone areas around the world do.

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daystar1952
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Hello.....I am the one who wrote the article in question. It was Professor Garth Nicolson who told me that his lab and MDL labs in N.J were both finding that 60% of lyme patients were infected with different strains of mycoplasma...the most prevalent one being mycoplasma fermentens.

Also, I was connected with a Plum Island maintenance worker who was on strike. The following was one of the emails he sent me

"I have worked there at least 14 years. We did have two different labs once. I've only worked in one mostly, Unfortunately I didn't know what they did in 257. I was working in 101. As far as lyme I know they had a special "Tick" lab but it was closed down by the time I started working there. I saw a lot of dead ticks, but what they where working on I don't know. Some doctors here will talk about their work, and what they are doing some won't.

I do know that what they say in the paper about not working on things that affect people is bull ****. If the doctors and animal workers are in moon suits ...positive pressure suits, and I cant go in to the room without it. Something is in that room that I shouldn't be breathing and has to affect humans.

I know once they worked on something from China that killed little girls ..just girls not boys, but only before puberty which I had a fit about because I had two girls who where very young. I can't tell you anything, because I don't know about the things your looking for. Most of the doctors are working on foot and mouth, fmd, West Nile. What you say is possible, I myself don't know.

You could ask DR Peter Mason. He lives in Conn. He is moving to Texas soon. He is going to one of the big universitys down there, and taking about four DRs with him. He was in charge of one of the hoof and mouth sections, and he was very cool if you get my drift. Please don't use my name I still need my job. I cant think of anyone else that would say anything. I'm sorry I couldn't help you more but I just don't know"

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Truthfinder
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I think we should all remain "highly supsicios" about the organisms actually housed at Lab 257, and what they really worked on.

In that Lab 257 book what troubled me the most was the complete breakdown of biological security in the later years. Safety measures were all but abondoned, and the lack of safety maintenance on the air and water contaminant control measures was positively horrifying.

Look what happened with the experiments on killer bees. Some got loose. Now we have a killer bee problem.

If people can't seem to keep track of critters as big as bees, how can we expect them to contain things they can't even see - and don't even have decedent tests to check for infection in people or animals that may become exposed?

Tracy

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Tracy
.... Prayers for the Lyme Community - every day at 6 p.m. Pacific Time and 9 p.m. Eastern Time just take a few moments to say a prayer wherever you are.

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Truthfinder
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Oh, and another thing.

If memory serves, the government's greatest achievment with mycoplasma species is that they figured out to separate the mycoplasma bugs from the myco-toxins that the bug produces. You get all the nasty effects of the bug, but no bug. And then they figured out how to "disperse" the mycotoxin to a given population.

What a beautiful bio-weapon they created: No way to test for it because there is no bug to detect. And no way to kill it because there is nothing there but the illness.

Very spooky stuff.

Tracy

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Tracy
.... Prayers for the Lyme Community - every day at 6 p.m. Pacific Time and 9 p.m. Eastern Time just take a few moments to say a prayer wherever you are.

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Corgilla
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Hi,

I don't know who all these new people are but if you search on mycloplasma or m. fermentins here you'll find a bunch of us that have it.

M. Fermentins is the germ associated with Gulf War Syndrone.

I tested positive from MDL a couple of years ago. I also grew up summering about 30 miles from Plum Island. Know lots of people who've worked there. Was also there during hurricane Bob, right in the eye of the storm.

If you want to think harder about this, read Lab 257. In there they mention West Nile Virus too. The first vet to discover it was the guy I bought my Corgi from - Dr. Jon Andresen.

All the people and times fit to my knowledge.

That's all I have to say about that...

Corgilla

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"I'll never forget good old Whatsisname."

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lpkayak
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i guess we should all relax now and feel safe cuz they are building a brand new building to study the stuff in...where is it? texas? florida? hope its not near the water!

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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ldfighter
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At the Lyme symposium in New Haven last month, a microbiologist from the U. of New Haven talked about her lab's research on mycoplasma in ticks collected in southern CT. The results (yikes):

68/87 (78%) carried one or more species of mycoplasma:
35/87 (40%) M. fermentans
53/87 (61%) M.genitalium (might be 53%, my notes aren't clear)
7/87 (8%) M. pneumoniae
(doesn't add up to 100% because some carried more than 1 species)

The rates for mycoplasma were higher than for borrelia (20%), babesia (34%), bartonella (30%) or ehrlichiosis (3%). 57% were carrying one of the above infections, apart from mycoplasma.

The next step is to prove mycoplasma can be transmitted from a tick bite, & they're looking for collaborators to help do that. She also mentioned that M. fermentans has some erythromycin & tetracycline resistance, and M. genitalium has some tetra resistance too. Also - mycoplasma alters pH, which is one way it persists. Not so comforting... at least someone's looking at this.

[ 13. June 2006, 08:51 PM: Message edited by: ldfighter ]

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oxygenbabe
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Thank you LDfighter for that good info.
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Foggy
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LDfighter, is the New Haven symposium info posted anywhere online? I want to show this to my LLMD.
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ldfighter
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Wish I could help, Foggy, but I don't think it's published anywhere yet. I did hear someone say the university may put out a DVD (would be great to have Dr. P's excellent talk, too)...

In the meantime, another option might be contacting the organizer of the symposium, who's also the head of the U. New Haven molecular bio program. Her contact info is at the bottom of this flyer. She spoke briefly about her experience with seronegative Lyme, misdiagnosis etc & how it got her interested in this line of research. She also said future conferences there will definitely be in the works.

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Trina
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Truthfinder,
So I wonder is that why the type of lyme disease in Missouri hardly ever shows up as lyme in Blood work even though the doctors know it is lyme because you pull off the tic and have an EM?


What about the Deadly Tulemeria did that tic disease exist before the 50 and 60's? And now almost 3,000 people die a year from it because their is no cure and we also are intrested in using it as a BW agent.

I have recently read that missouri also has a new tic bourne disease called MO1 that is deadly.I cannot find out any more info than that though.
[Eek!]
I have lyme that ought to be enough though.

--------------------
Trina

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Truthfinder
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Trina,

My best guess would be that there is a different strain of Borrelia causing illness in MO. I wonder if any of those tests were done using the Bowen test? If a Bowen test is negative, you are definitely dealing with a different strain of Borrelia, a different organism altogether, or transmission of toxins alone?

Regarding B. bissetti, for instance, in one European country, ``Some of the patients had variable and unpredictable serologic responses, including a lack of antibody response despite disseminated disease''.
http://home.pon.net/caat/lyme/research1.htm

Well, B. bissetti has been found in several U.S. states, including mine. That profile would certainly fit whatever is going on in Missouri.

Tularemia was discovered in 1911 when a bunch of ground squirrels died from it. It used to be associated more with wild rabbits, but sounds like rodents carry it, too. I don't know when it was determined to be tick-born, but I know that you can get it from horse fly and deer fly bites. My understanding is that with proper antibiotic treatment, the death rate is pretty low. It is those that don't get treatment that are at high risk. Or maybe I have missed something about Tularemia.

I think MO1 is a strain of Babesia, like WA1 and CA1. (?)

Yes, Lyme is a sufficient problem in itself.

Gosh, this talk of Tularemia makes me wonder: I have had several deer fly and horse fly bites - very painful with a lot of swelling; I had a pet ground squirrel for about 4 years in the 60s; I handled at least a hundred dead, bloody jack rabbits in the 60s (we thought it was only cottontail rabbits that had Tularemia). I guess there isn't much sense in worrying. I would probably be dead if there was a problem [Smile]

Tracy

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Tracy
.... Prayers for the Lyme Community - every day at 6 p.m. Pacific Time and 9 p.m. Eastern Time just take a few moments to say a prayer wherever you are.

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