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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Liver Support while on Mepron

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Author Topic: Liver Support while on Mepron
jwenny
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Hi everyone,

Was wondering what's the best stuff to be on for liver support while on Mepron? I understand Milk Thistle and CoQ10 lowers Mepron's effectiveness. Any others to consider that defintely won't lower levels of Mepron?

Thanks and hope you all feel better soon!

Posts: 187 | From Gaithersburg, Maryland | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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I'm not sure, but can't you still take milk thistle if you take it several hours away from the Mepron??

up for some answers!

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Lisianthus
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Dandelion and sarsaparilla are very good for liver detoxing. I take these two daily.


Info on sarsaparilla:
http://www.nutrasanus.com/sarsaparilla.html


Here is some information I found :


Turmeric (Curcuma longa) falls into both the food and medicinal plant category. As a seasoning, turmeric is used a lot in Indian food. This substance helps to protect the liver against damage, fights inflammation and oxidation, aids in digestion by stimulating bile flow and supports liver detoxification. Try adding it to your favorite chicken and rice dishes.

Caution: Long-term use may cause gastrointestinal disturbances.

Typical dose: As a tea, use 1 teaspoon of dried root to 1 cup water, simmer and take 3 cups/day. Incorporate into diet as a seasoning.



Ginger(Zingiber officinale) is used in cooking and as a medicinal herb. It contains 8 liver-protecting compounds. It aids digestion by stimulating bile flow and contains more than 12 antioxidant compounds.

Caution: Ginger is not recommended for people taking anticoagulants, avoid taking if stomach is overstimulated and take in moderation during early pregnancy.

Typical dose: Use in cooking. To prepare a tea, add 1-2 slices of fresh ginger to 1 cup of water and simmer.



Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is considered both a food and a medicinal herb. As a food, dandelion leaves are eaten as a vegetable and are usually added to salads or cooked like spinach. Dandelion root is used as an herb to help stimulate bile flow and help improve the symptoms of various liver diseases, including hepatitis.

Caution: Avoid if you suffer from biliary ailments or are low in pota-ssium. This herb may lower blood sugar levels.

Typical dose: 3 cups of tea per day. To prepare tea, add 1 teaspoon of dried dandelion root to 1 cup of water and simmer. Dandelion leaves are delicious as a vegetable.



Burdock (Arctium lappa) root can be added to soups and stews. Burdock acts as a powerful antioxidant and as a blood purifier. It is also good for gastrointestinal problems and can help to restore liver and gallbladder function.

Caution: Avoid using if allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds and daisies. Large amounts may cause hypoglycemia. If taking insulin, consult your doctor before using because your insulin dosage may require adjustment. Do not use if pregnant or breastfeeding.

Typical dose: 3 cups of tea per day. Add 1 teaspoon of dried root to 1 cup of water and simmer. Use in cooking.



The following is a list of herbs that are used as medicinal plants only:


Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root is an herb that can help to reduce injury to the liver cells. It has been used in the treatment of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis. Studies have shown that it can reduce liver enzymes and improve the symptoms of chronic hepatitis.

Caution: Licorice root can increase blood pressure if taken in large doses. If you have high blood pressure, do not take more than 3 cups of licorice tea per day and avoid taking licorice extracts in liquid, capsule or pill forms. Also, avoid licorice if you are pregnant, have heart disease or take medications for heart disease.

Typical dose: 3 cups of tea per day. To prepare tea add 1 teaspoon of dried licorice root to 1 cup of water and simmer.



Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds are used as a medicinal herb only. They help to stabilize cell membranes and limit the number of poisons that enter the cell. Milk thistle also acts as an antioxidant, helps to repair liver cells and helps the liver to make new cells. It can be used in either tea or capsule form. When purchasing capsules, make sure they are standardized to 80% silymarin.

Caution: Avoid using if suffering from breast, uterine or ovarian cancer; endometriosis or uterine fibroids. Avoid using when pregnant and/or lactating. Milk thistle may cause an allergic reaction in people sensitive to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds and daisies.

Typical dose: If taking capsules, 400-800mg/day. If taking as a tea, drink 1 cup per day or as directed by your healthcare provider. To make tea, use 1 teaspoon of crushed seeds to 1 cup of water and simmer.



Schisandra (Schisandra chinensis) has been used for liver protection. It may help to lower liver enzyme levels and improve the symptoms of chronic viral hepatitis.

Caution: Schisandra may make symptoms of peptic ulcer disease or reflux disease worse.

Typical dose: 3 cups of schisandra tea per day. To prepare tea, add 1 teaspoon of dried berries to 1 cup of water and simmer. Herbal extracts should be standardized to 20mg lignan content.


Hope this helps you,
Lisi

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jwenny
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Thanks Lymetutu and Lisi!!! Excellent suggestions. I drink Dandelion tea occasionally but I will definitely look into the other ones...THANKS!!!

I also heard about taking Milk Thistle far away from your Mepron times, but wasn't sure if the Milk Thistle will flush out the Mep already in your blood.

Best Wishes!

Posts: 187 | From Gaithersburg, Maryland | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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