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Author Topic: Smokers
sienna
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Is anyone still smoking? I know it's not a good
idea and I have cut down, but as yet have been
unable to stop (stress and all that).

I read an article on Camlyme.com that they
are researching a vacine for Lyme Disease using
tobacco leaves!

If they are thinking that tobacco can kill the
beasts, I'm not sure I would want to give up just yet.

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sienna
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Should read canlyme.com
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wrotek
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I have a theory that caffeine perpetuates smoking addiction.
You drink coffee, you are more stressed and in anxiety and You reach for cigarette. Everybody likes to drink coffee with cigarette, is not it [Smile]

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Lioness
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Sienna,

Do you know the name of the article at CanLyme?

Also, I smoked for over 20 yrs. Quitting here and there in between.

About 2 1/2 years ago I told my BF that I would quit someday. And he said "oh honey, I know you will. When they are putting nails in your coffin, you won't have a choice."

I smoked my last cigarette the next morning.

It is the hardest thing I ever did. And I have made it through some pretty tough things in my life.

Every once in a while, I still want a cigarette. But, NOT A DAY goes by that I am not grateful I don't smoke any more.

When smoking, it is not only the tobacco you are putting in your body, it is a lot of chemicals too.

Please don't think of this a lecture, as I struggled for so long with giving it up.

I really am interested in reading the article but there were so many there, I was not sure which one.

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dontlikeliver
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I don't believe you will get well as long as you smoke. Giving up isn't easy, but it's got to be done if you want to get well.
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sienna
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'Lyme Vaccine from Tobacco'
Global News - approx 75th article on left

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Geneal
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Try cold laser treatment. Stopped all cravings for nicotine.

That's not to say I that I don't miss it........ a lot, but having people around you die from lung cancer from smoking is kind of hard to ignore,.

Besides, a pill or liquid made from tobacco leaves wouldn't be the same as inhaling the smoke.

Geeze, maybe I need to get one of my free booster laser sessions.

Just thinking about it makes me want one.

You can do it.

Hugs,

Geneal

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lou4656
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Yes . . . I admit that I am still smoking. I work part time in a bar, which makes it a bit more difficult to quit . . . but no excuses. I know all reasons that I should quit. I'll get there some day.

--------------------
LouLou

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Sue
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I thought smoking might be a good thing to keep the bugs from taking over the brain............. just do anti fungals cuz tobacco has fungus in it besides the nicotine that may kill or inhibit bugs in the brain ??????????
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Cathy DeVoe
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I can definitely relate. I smoked for 20 years, stopped 7 then started again.

Stopping the 2nd time was the hardest thing I ever did....besides herxing from lyme.

It was also the best thing for my health.

I think we women regard our cigs as our friend. They are always there when we want them.

We think unlike everything else they never leave us. Try to think of them differently.

Like reading up on all the chemicals you are inhaling each time you smoke. Then concentrate on that when you inhale.

That has helped me because I want one everyday of the year!

Good luck with this very hard vice.
Cathy

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CaliforniaLyme
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I'm an ex-smoker!!!
11 years no smoking in April!*)!!

Was 4 packs a day!!!!!
(Seriously, I was a chain smoker from the moment I got up to bedtime- I even smoked- with arm outstretched- I am not kidding- IN THE SHOWER!!!!)

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Kendrick
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I had such a severe reaction about a month and half ago, that people say "Oh, yeah... that is just a herx", that I couldn't smoke.

I could barely get up to use the bathroom, so there was no way I could smoke.

I plan on getting back on the bandwagon once I get better though(I can move around now, so I'm a lot better). I'm not a quitter.

--------------------
Never walk through a cornfield backwards.

About me(Yahoo): http://360.yahoo.com/profile-NR1Y8cw6fqhtrewwItSlfsgQDIhaOojd

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Hope4Better
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im on wellbutrin XL 150mg for depression, ADD, low sex drive, and and and TO QUIT SMOKING..

im only on week one, but i have already cut back considerably..

i can wait till it full kicks in..

ask your doc about it..i think the one for smoking is call zyban...but its the same thing as wellbutrin..just different names.

--------------------
If Your Going Through Hell, Keep Going...

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wrotek
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quote:
CaliforniaLyme
Member # 7136 - posted 13 March, 2007 10:58 AM I'm an ex-smoker!!!
11 years no smoking in April!*)!!

Was 4 packs a day!!!!!
(Seriously, I was a chain smoker from the moment I got up to bedtime- I even smoked- with arm outstretched- I am not kidding- IN THE SHOWER!!!!)

LOL 4 packs is 80 cigarettes. Day has 12 hours which is 720 minutes. 720/80 cigs = one cigarette every 9 minutes [Smile] [bonk] [Eek!]
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Lioness
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quote:
Originally posted by wrotek:
quote:
CaliforniaLyme
Member # 7136 - posted 13 March, 2007 10:58 AM I'm an ex-smoker!!!
11 years no smoking in April!*)!!

Was 4 packs a day!!!!!
(Seriously, I was a chain smoker from the moment I got up to bedtime- I even smoked- with arm outstretched- I am not kidding- IN THE SHOWER!!!!)

LOL 4 packs is 80 cigarettes. Day has 12 hours which is 720 minutes. 720/80 cigs = one cigarette every 9 minutes [Smile] [bonk] [Eek!]
And I thought my one or two packs a day was bad... [Eek!]

I did the tub/smoking thing, but not the SHOWER! LOL!! Shows how addicting it really is!

I quit for 4 years once, then went back. I was very young though. I PRAY I never go back again!!

I am usually no quitter either, but when it comes to smoking I am! [Big Grin]

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TerryK
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OK, for what it's worth, my sister, my mom and I all had major flares of our illness within 6 months of quitting smoking. Could be coincidence but seems pretty odd.
Terry

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lymemomtooo
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While at the brain damaged clinic for my daughter's evaluation, I saw a book that shows brain damage from different things.

And the photos of "smoker brain" were not normal. With all of the other chances for brain damage, why take a chance of making it worse if you are able to stop.

Good luck.

My dad was hooked for life and started turning off the oxygen to have a Marlboro. I told him I did not want to bury him in pieces.

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CaliforniaLyme
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I am not kidding when I say there was not more than a few breaths all day that I took without cigs!! I was gross with them!!! My friends made up a dance in high school called The Sarah which made fun of how I would smoke (of course) while dancing at dance clubs- *sigh* youth!!!!!!!!

I don't look really old for my age despite it all*)!*) Thank goodness*)!*!

But anyway, just wanted to chime in to emphasize that even if you were a bad smoker, like ME, you can quit*)!

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Ganjagal
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I quit January 23- and I felt awful for about 2 weeks- I figured all that extra O2 cause a good herx. Felt really good after that.
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Marnie
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The acetylcholine receptors are also called the nicotinic receptors...

Nicotine locks on.

This impacts the levels of OTHER neurotransmitters.

Besides Vitamin C levels (dropping)...

"Smokers are usually well-represented among the subjects used in these studies -- and a pro-oxidant of concern in tobacco smoke is nitrogen dioxide and related nitrogenous compounds.

When alpha-tocopherol (in Vitamin E and most abundant in us) reacts with nitrogen dioxide it forms a mutagenic nitrosating agent,

whereas gamma-tocopherol effectively detoxifies

[PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (USA); Cooney, RN; 90(5):1771-1775 (1993)].

Moreover, supplementation with alpha-tocopherol alone reduces blood levels of gamma-tocopherol, thereby reducing protection against oxidation by reactive oxygen species [PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (USA); Christen, S; 94(7):3217-3222 (1997)

Until you can quit, Gamma E by Jarrow Formulas might help.

I have read it is harder to quit if you smoke menthol cigarettes.

It is easier to quit smoking when on narcotics post op...but exchanging one bad habit for another (illegal) one isn't a good idea.

Good luck. I know it is hard!!!

[ 15. March 2007, 12:04 PM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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Marnie
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P.S. After reading my post above...

This...just in...

Smoking ALSO lowers Omega 3 levels. (In addition to alcohol...and all spirochetes ferment glucose to ethanol/alcohol.)


Looks like low Omega 3 levels may be a huge problem in lyme.

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pq
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sulfonil ?
http://thorne.com
``Thioglycerols in this reacted sulfur compound readily bind to nicotinic adrenergic receptors in the brain, thus blocking the receptors' ability to bind with other substances. ''

[ 17. March 2007, 10:07 AM: Message edited by: pq ]

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catalysT
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There is a new prescription out for smoking cessation called 'Chantix' (varenicline). It is an alpha(4)beta(2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist.

Actually, I would really like to try that drug! I don't even smoke anymore, but it sounds useful for cognition (I have ADD, etc). It would probably help with mental fogginess in lyme too.

I quit smoking using an alpha(4)beta(2) drug, Aniracetam. Also used L-Deprenyl (MAO-B inhibitor), and L-Theanine (for stress, as needed). So chantix might help being an a4b2 agonist.

Just figured I'd share that s'all.

[ 16. March 2007, 06:29 PM: Message edited by: catalysT ]

--------------------
"You know, the worst, meanest, nastiest, ticks in the world are politicks," - Steve Nostrum

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Ganjagal
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quote:
Originally posted by catalysT:
There is a new prescription out for smoking cessation called 'Chantix' (varenicline). It is an alpha(4)beta(2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist.

Actually, I would really like to try that drug! I don't even smoke anymore, but it sounds useful for cognition (I have ADD, etc). It would probably help with mental fogginess in lyme too.

I quit smoking using an alpha(4)beta(2) drug, Aniracetam. Also used L-Deprenyl (MAO-B inhibitor), and L-Theanine (for stress, as needed). So chantix might help being an a4b2 agonist.

Just figured I'd share that s'all.

Oh Chantix Works! The thing with that is it leaves a horrid taste in your mouth. For me it cut my cravings by about 40%, but I don't recall any more clarity on it then off it.
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Marnie
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nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR, also known as "ionotropic" acetylcholine receptors) are particularly responsive to nicotine

Nicotine:

A colorless, poisonous alkaloid, C10H14N2, derived from the tobacco plant and used as an insecticide.

It is the substance in tobacco to which smokers can become addicted.

Nanomolar concentrations of nicotine

enhance release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate

into the synapses between the cells of the medial habenular nucleus and the interpeduncular nucleus.

Nicotine has in most cases been shown to improve some aspects of intellectual performance, although some have shown the drug to be detrimental (38).

These results must be interpreted in light of nicotine's inverted-U effect curve; although at lower doses a positive relationship exists between dose and performance, beyond a certain dose, the drug increasingly hinders performance (33).

Jones et al. studied the effect of subcutaneous nicotine on humans with dementia of Alzheimer's type and on normal controls (40).

The drug was shown to improve several measures of performance in those with the disease. Nicotine increased motor speed as measured by a finger tapping test, decreased the amount of time spent copying a sequence of images, and increased the ability of subjects to pick a flashing light presented on a screen.

This study is in accordance with others indicating that the drug increases attention and vigilance more than short-term memory (38).

Drugs with actions similar to that of nicotine with a more favorable side-effect profile are being developed.

One drug developed by Abbott Laboratories (ABT-418) has been shown to modestly increase (~11% above baseline accuracy) the performance of aged monkeys in a delayed matching to sample test (41).

Although nicotinic agonists are promising drugs, the only drugs widely used for the treatment of AD are the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

(Acetylcholinesterase breaks down acetylcholine.
The above new drugs are trying to keep acetylcholine levels i.e., prevent its breakdown.)

It has been shown recently that nicotine inhibits the aggregation of precursor b-peptides into the oligomeric b-sheets characteristic of Alzheimer's disease plaques (44).

In addition, stimulation of nicotinic receptors has been shown to decrease the toxicity of b-amyloid (45).

http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/mjm/v05n02/v05p090/v05p090main.htm

Behavioral reinforcement and locomotor stimulation evoked by either nicotine or ethanol
are both associated with the release of dopamine from mesolimbic dopaminergic terminals located in the nucleus accumbens.

Furthermore, stimulation of cholinergic neurons is known to cause

release of various neurotransmitters including dopamine, GABA, epinephrine, and glutamate .

Thus, interactions of nicotine and ethanol at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nnAChRs) may explain the linkage between drinking and smoking.

http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/57/2/193


(My note St. Johns Wort looks to increase those neurotransmitters also.)

Fairly easy to understand website re: nicotine's action :

http://www.galaxygoo.org/biochem/nicotine/nicotine_action.html

This post in NO WAY is promoting smoking cigarettes! There are far too many toxins in cigarettes.

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Curley911
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My LLMD is cracking down on smokers. He is very frustrated with the level of commitment it takes to get well from this disease and how those who smoke show a significant lack of response as opposed to those who do not smoke.
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AliG
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quote:
Originally posted by Marnie:

This post in NO WAY is promoting smoking cigarettes! There are far too many toxins in cigarettes.

It does help explain why quitting might be even more difficult for a "neuro-lymie".

--------------------
Note: I'm NOT a medical professional. The information I share is from my own personal research and experience. Please do not construe anything I share as medical advice, which should only be obtained from a licensed medical practitioner.

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buckfever
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Smoking is a" Love - Hate " thing for me .I basically feel like a failure when it comes to it .

I pretty much have tried eveything but hipnotism , including chantrix ,but when I tried the chantrix the muscle pain came back with a vengence ! It did nothing to ease my cravings .

Yhe last time my pcp asked me when I was going to quit I replied " when you start helping me treat my lyme & coinfections ".

My anxiety level goes through the roof when I quit for even a day or two . I , like many smokers , did quit for a year about 20yrs ago ,so I know it can be done .

The crazy thing is that I really hate being a smoker !!! [bonk] [bonk] [bonk]

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Dizzyygirll
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I quit using chantix. It worked really well for me, unfortunately, and I posted this in general support. I am just very disappointed in the fact that my lyme came back and I just quit smoking May 2, 2007.

Seems very strange to me and disheartening. I will continue to be smoke free but just wanted to feel better and ended up feeling worst.

Three months, one week, four days, 11 hours, 52 minutes and 6 seconds. 2587 cigarettes not smoked, saving $517.47. Life saved: 1 week, 1 day, 23 hours, 35 minutes.

I have a meter that gives me these figures when ever I need to be reminded. That is my little reminder of how long it has been and how much money and life I have saved!

--------------------
Life is too short for drama & petty things, so kiss slowly, laugh insanely, love truly, forgive quickly and rejoice in the fact that most of us are indeed unstable.

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tailz
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Lung cancer is caused by some factor other than cigarettes, but since cigarettes are 'out' today, we are unlikely to ever learn the real cause. People have to hate some habit, I guess, and smoking 'wins'.

Call me crazy, but some days my cigarettes make me feel sick - other days, cigarettes have actually helped me breathe BETTER during an asthmatic-like attack. They have actually helped STOP a wicked cough too many times.

I know I did not imagine this either, or I would not be admitting that some days they make me feel sicker.

On that note, it should also be noted here that FOOD makes me feel sick some days and better others, so I think it's time for non-smokers to stop lecturing smokers.

The only thing smoking has been proven to cause is stained teeth, and heck, mino made my teeth worse than my cigarettes ever did, as did this infection.

Sorry, but nobody here is going to tell me my cigarettes are bad for me while they hold a cell phone (radiation) to their head when it's in the field of my head. Ditto for wireless internet.

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Dizzyygirll
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I know for a fact that Smoking is what killed my mother at the age of 57. She smoked three packs a day for over 30 years. It started with emphesyma and then COPD.

I don't know what damage, if any, it has done to me, but I know it did take my mother and my children's MeeMaw away from us way too soon. And that is the reason I chose to quit. To each his own.

I didn't take any of what everyone else said as a lecture. I hope I did not come across as lecturing. A lot of my friends still smoke and you will never hear me complain about their smoking, I actually love the smell of it when they are smoking.

--------------------
Life is too short for drama & petty things, so kiss slowly, laugh insanely, love truly, forgive quickly and rejoice in the fact that most of us are indeed unstable.

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tailz
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Okay, then explain why years ago, when everybody and their uncle smoked, lung cancer rates were actually quite low compared to lung cancer rates today, when fewer people smoke.

People who never smoke have gotten lung cancer, and they've yet to produce lung cancer in rats. I think this explains it -

http://www.vialls.com/transpositions/smoking.html

Cigarettes are the 'new' prohibition.

I personally think alcohol is dangerous. If I could run over a little child while smoking and driving, I guarantee they wouldn't leave bars that served exclusively cigarettes open at all hours of the morning waiting to catch me doing it.

I have bad habits. You have bad habits. We all have bad habits. I don't want to hear about mine though until all of yours are gone - (beginning with YOUR cell phone which is harming ME).

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tailz
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By the way, consider this possibility - What if -

smoking causes lung cancer when in the presence of cell phones? Hmmm?

Now does smoking cause lung cancer or do cell phones?

I vote for cell phones. Tobacco at least is a plant.

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AliG
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My uncle quit using Chantrix. What a wonderful drug! A few weeks after starting it, he was coughing up blood....

Dx? squamous cell carcinoma (the deadliest kind)

The latest news? It's now in his brain.

I think quitting gives you cancer, for all the stress you put yourself through.

My latest theory is that the chest X-rays are what causes it. Every time a smoker coughs, the Dr. send them for a chest X-ray. They don't do that to non-smokers. [Roll Eyes]

I think repeatedly having your boobs squashed and x-rayed gives you breast cancer.

Too many belts in the groin causes prostate cancer.

Too much looking for cancer causes cancer and fear of cancer causes cancer. [shake]

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Note: I'm NOT a medical professional. The information I share is from my own personal research and experience. Please do not construe anything I share as medical advice, which should only be obtained from a licensed medical practitioner.

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EWT1638
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Quit Smoking! Please. Dr. B says he does not think Lyme patients will get well until they stop (2006 Lyme Conf. in VA).

Aside from this, I've watched too many loved ones die due to smoke related illnesses.

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When you reach your "wits-end" remember this: "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give you. I do not give as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid." John 14:27

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charlie
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....I quit smoking because it's just plain frustrating...I'd be driving along and the lit end of my cigarette would fall off right into my beer....
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zil
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I quit with using chantix, took it for 6 months. Smoked over 30 yrs. It still takes some willpower but cuts the cravings a lot. I've quit a few times in the past and craved cigarettes daily. This time I don't. Not had a cig in about a year. Liz
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mojo
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My Lyme Dr. will not accept patients that smoke. They have to be smoke free for six months.

When my husband told him that he smokes my Dr. said "You don't smoke around her do you?" It was actually kind of funny.

We stopped all smoking in the house 20 years ago just prior to adopting my daughter. I smoked back then, too, we just both smoked outdoors.

My husband does everything possible to slow his smoking down - including rolling his own!

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Skyler
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I have smoked fairly lightly for maybe 4 years...

I have never found it to be addictive at all. I forget there are even ciggarettes, lol.

I loved them the few (2) times a year I would drink (loved packs of them...) or after a meal, or when I am around them.

I started because it would help with my 'migranes' which turned out to be lyme related...

Now it does not really help with the headaches.

I wish everyone wanting to quit out there the strength to quit! It will be one of the hardest things you can do, but everyone is capable of doing it. [Big Grin]

--------------------
I'm probably sleeping...

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Skyler
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lol, good one charlie!!! lol.

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I'm probably sleeping...

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tailz
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If I ever quit, it will only be because of charlie's problem. lol

Ali hit it on the nose though - when I smoker coughs, they automatically get a chest x-ray. In fact, I think I had like 3 chest x-rays in a period of about a year or a year and a half.

Then 10 years from now they are going to blame my smokes for my lung cancer? Not without my getting really, really loud - they won't.

It's a plant. Personally, I don't think marijuana should be illegal either. They're just afraid we'll find something we can actually grow cheap ourselves that brings us health and happiness.

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Boomerang
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lol Charlie. Too funny!
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lymeHerx001
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HAD TO STOP

My MCS got really bad on it. This is also when I got my first case of Vertigo. Didnt no what the hell was wrong with me. Went to an ENT and he looked in my sinuses and saw nothing. Gave me some claritin and sent me home. Thats it.

Now I have chronic MCS and Vertigo and even the smallest whif of smoke or mold gives me post nasal drip...I wish I could go out and party and smoke. How easy would that be.

Yes folks, it has been confirmed. Im in hell.

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tailz
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Lymeherx - But I wonder if you are really reacting to electromagnetic fields, and not so much smoke and mold?

I was like you last year around this time. Every time I would go out in traffic, especially if the air was moist with humidity or dew, I would immediately feel as if I was being choked.

Turns out this would happen though even in light traffic if the air was moist.

I did some research, and it appears that electromagnetic fields were the culprit, more so than the actual pollutants.

Apparently moisture conducts, and conduction causes the chemicals to cross the blood-brain barrier. Bacteria, fungi, viruses, and pollutants are essentially 'charged' by these electromagnetic fields.

Check out the link in my signature. I think you will discover this is more your problem than the actual chemicals themselves. I've made it my life purpose to tell others what I learned. Hope you feel better soon.

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lymeHerx001
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Tailz no doubt that Im reacting to EM fields too.

Going into a circuit city or big chain computer store my brain just buzzes and my vertigo gets even worse.

I could attribute that just to offgassing though.
But I think its both.

I do know its mold though because in other environments other then my house I feel alot better. Also there are certain rooms at work where there is mold and I feel horribe. It doesnt bother anyone else as it does me so yes.

Mold first then chemicals then EM fields.

Ill take some EM before MOLD anyday. Go figure.

I guess a walk in the forest is out?

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tailz
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But see the mold is basically getting 'charged' by the EMFs. This is why dust sticks to TV screens. The mold is essentially sticking to the mucous membranes of your lungs, sinuses, etc...

I just don't think God would cause us to be allergic to things that occur naturally such as pollens and molds and so forth.

I'll bet you have problems with even the alternating 60 hz frequency coming into your home on a daily basis. I wonder if your mold problems could be solved with Stetzer filters???

I've thought of trying these, but I can't afford them. My breathing isn't too bad right now, but then again, I haven't been running the air. Once winter gets here, my lungs will be problematic again I'm sure.

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lymeHerx001
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Wow thats really strange tailz, I never thought about it that way.

I think its really just the mold because I can be walking down the street and get a whif and boom, I feel it.

Something to do with the candida and the mold.
I feel dumb typing this right now because of my brain fog caused by the mold and lyme so Ill just end it.

IGM/IGA mast cells, antigens bla bla bla. I tried reading it. Didnt lessen my suffering.
quote:
Originally posted by tailz:
But see the mold is basically getting 'charged' by the EMFs. This is why dust sticks to TV screens. The mold is essentially sticking to the mucous membranes of your lungs, sinuses, etc...

I just don't think God would cause us to be allergic to things that occur naturally such as pollens and molds and so forth.

I'll bet you have problems with even the alternating 60 hz frequency coming into your home on a daily basis. I wonder if your mold problems could be solved with Stetzer filters???

I've thought of trying these, but I can't afford them. My breathing isn't too bad right now, but then again, I haven't been running the air. Once winter gets here, my lungs will be problematic again I'm sure.


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tailz
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I have brain fog today, too. Some days I can read the most complex studies and follow them completely - other days 'The Cat in the Hat' doesn't make sense to me.

I think it's too much 'interference' from EMFs. I ate high copper peas today, too, which isn't helping - but I CRAVED them.

But it makes sense, doesn't it? - that these mold and pollen particles are essentially being 'charged' by the electromagnetic chaos surrounding us?

I wish I could afford Stetzer filters, but that wouldn't help me any when I need to leave the house.

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Health
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tailz
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Wow. This post even needs punctuation.
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