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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Herbal remedies (licorice) for POTS?

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Author Topic: Herbal remedies (licorice) for POTS?
char
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Hi,

Our pediatric cardiologist suggested that we could try some herbal remedies to help my daughter with her POTS symptoms.

She has had an increase in symptoms over the last month.

He mentioned licorice. Another choice is daily injections of a parahormone, Octeriotide.

Anyone have any experience with licorice or other herbal remedies?

Char

Posts: 1230 | From US | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
char
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anyone?
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WildCondor
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Licorice helped raise my blood pressure a little. I have no experience with the other meds you describe (check your private messages)

NMH treatment is tailored to the individual, so your daughter's case is not "textbook" if you know what I mean.

[Smile] Hang in there!

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char
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Hi Wildcondor,

What form and dose of licorice did you take?

Thanks,

Char

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Ruth Ruth
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Today I noticed that BioHealth offers licorice root extract. I use some of their products (not this one) and they are good quality.

I take licorice in a blend for adrenal/endochrine support. But it is a very low amount.

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When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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CaliforniaLyme
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Licorice root tea is good for asthma BUT licorice in large amounts can be... FATAL!~! SO don't overdo it!!! Moderation in all... Licorice can also interact with medications!!!! Licorice RAISES BP and personally I would never rec'd it to anyone with ANY BP issues- only for atshma!!!
Because people with BP issues can overreact to things- Licorice raises my bp!!! There is a tea called "Tension Tamer" which includes licorice root and it RAISES my BP considerably which I always htink is kinda sad considering the name...
and stupid of them to include it in the recipe!
(Celestial Seasonings "Tension Tamer" tea, raises my BP in MINUTES by 20+ degrees!!!) I am very susceptible to licorice!!!

1: Int J Cardiol. 2007 Feb 21;

Licorice-induced hypokalemia.

Mumoli N, Cei M.
Section of Emergency Medicine and Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Livorno Hospital, viale Alfieri 36, 57100 Livorno, Italy.

Excessive intake of licorice can cause hypokalemia and hypertension and generally, the onset and severity of symptoms depend on the dose and duration of licorice intake, as well as individual susceptibility.

We describe a patient with hypokalemia caused by long term consumption of natural licorice root after quitting smoking.

The case emphasizes the importance of considering a detailed patients' history, which often may lead the treating physician to the correct clinical diagnosis.

PMID: 17320224

Licorice can also interact with medications!!!!

1: Xenobiotica. 2002 Jun;32(6):451-78. Links
Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal remedies and medicinal drugs.
Ioannides C.
Molecular Toxicology Group, School of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. [email protected]

1. The use of herbal products to treat a wide range of conditions is rising rapidly, leading to increased intake of phytochemicals. Recent studies revealed potentially fatal interactions between herbal remedies and traditional drugs.


2. In transplant patients, self-medication with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has led to a drop in plasma levels of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine, causing tissue rejection.


3. Intake of St John's wort increases the expression of intestinal P-glycoprotein and the expression of CYP3A4 in the liver and intestine. The combined up-regulation in intestinal P-glycoprotein and hepatic and intestinal CYP3A4 impairs the absorption and stimulates the metabolism of cyclosporine, leading to subtherapeutic plasma levels. The St John's wort component, hyperforin, contributes to the induction of CYP3A4.

4. St John's wort also enhances the metabolism of other CYP3A4 substrates including the protease inhibitors indinavir and nevirapine, oral contraceptives, and tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline.

5. Other herbal remedies with the potential to modulate cytochrome P450 activity and thus participate in interactions with conventional drugs include Milk thistle, Angelica dahurica, ginseng, garlic preparations, Danshen and liquorice.

6. Herbal products are currently not subject to the rigorous testing indispensable for conventional drugs. However, if potential drug interactions are to be predicted, it is essential that the ability of herbal products to interfere with drug-metabolizing enzyme systems is fully established.

PMID: 12160480

1: Br Med J. 1952 Feb 16;1(4754):360-1. Links
Fatal hypokalaemic alkalosis with tetany during liquorice and PAS therapy.
ROUSSAK NJ.
PMID: 14896146

1: J Hum Hypertens. 2006 Jun;20(6):465-6. Links
Comment on: J Hum Hypertens. 2001 Aug;15(8):549-52. JAMA. 1995 Aug 23-30;274(8):620-5.

A hypertensive urgency induced by the continuous intake of a herbal remedy containing liquorice.

Breidthardt T, Namdar M, Hess B.
PMID: 16543912

Hypertension in licorice abuse. A case report. G Ital Cardiol. 1983 PMID: 6884644

Liquorice and hypertension Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1978 PMID: 668509

Liquorice-induced hypertension--a new understanding of an old disease: case report and brief review. Neth J Med. 1995 PMID: 8544895

Hypertension encephalopathy after liquorice ingestion. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 1993 PMID: 8453813

Liquorice intoxication caused by alcohol-free pastis. Lancet. 1983 PMID: 6134202

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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pamyla
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I'm currently taking licorice root, and have also taken it in the past for many months at a time. My POTS doc originally recommended it to me, saying it was similar to florinef, helping your body retain sodium.

It's always given me a bit of an energy boost, but I find after being on it awhile my face always breaks out - not quite sure why [Razz]

I'm currently taking vitamin shoppe generic brand, and I take 1 pill first thing in the morning. This time, another doc has recommended it for adrenal support.

hth,
Pam

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shoney
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Char-My LLMD told me to try licorice root, as did my POTS doc.
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fatigued15
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My son took licorice along with other adrenal supplements. It elevated his blood pressure and he had to stop it. He was not taking this for NMH. He took the Metagenics brand. I did think of giving this to my daughter for NMH.
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char
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Thanks guys,

I am looking into a tinture form that you can regulate amount easily.

Will see cardiologist next week to get advice on dosage.

Char

Posts: 1230 | From US | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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