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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » "VA is not a state that has issues with lyme"???? That's what the doc said.........

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Author Topic: "VA is not a state that has issues with lyme"???? That's what the doc said.........
robi
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I recently PM'd a new person and this is what the doc told him. PLease provide proof that this doc is mistaken.

Here's some to start.

#1 -- LYME DISEASE RISK ASSESSMENT, FORT EUSTIS, VIRGINIA
Please follow this link:

http://members.utech.net/users/10766/031.txt

This report is from 1993 ........... I dont think there are less ticks!!!!!!!!!! When are is the medical community going to wake up?

#2 -- Warmer Weather Brings Out Ticks Carrying Lyme Disease
May 10, 2007 - 10:53am
Darci Marchese, WTOP Radio

WASHINGTON - With the warmer weather, ticks are becoming more of a problem.

In northern Virginia, 60 cases of Lyme Disease have been reported, compared with zero this time last year.

The Virginia Department of Health believes the number of cases may just be the "tip of the iceberg," says spokeswoman Lucy Caldwell.

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Now, since I put reality on the back burner, my days are jam-packed and fun-filled. ..........lily tomlin as 'trudy'

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lymednva
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Then there is the DC Fox 5 report that has been discussed here this week. I'm sure you can find it as it has been up at the top a lot and was initially reported on Monday, I believe. It featured the daughter of a Lymenet member.

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Lymednva

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Melanie Reber
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Hey Dearie,

research 'Virginia and ticks' and you will be busy for awhile.

Also see:
http://lymememorial.org/State_Stats/State_Statistics_Virginia.htm

M

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Virginia of Yore
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I got lyme in VA--migratory birds have brought it in, and we have tons of deer to harbor it besides. According to my local clinic, "We don't have lyme around here!" Never mind the tick was DNA positive for lyme, and so was I...

I was told that at Quantico (Marine Base) a medical person there said that they had so many lyme cases they were hiding it, so as not to panic the Marines having to crawl around in the tick infested grounds there during training.

The government doesn't look for what it doesn't want to find, so it doesn't have to pay for it, and no one "panics". "Deny, deny, deny" is an old tactic.

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Tincup
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J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Dec;41(12):5557-62.

Evidence of Borrelia lonestari DNA in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) removed from humans.

Stromdahl EY, Williamson PC, Kollars TM Jr, Evans SR, Barry RK, Vince MA, Dobbs NA.

Entomological Sciences Program, U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010-5403, USA. [email protected]

We used a nested PCR with Borrelia flagellin gene (flaB) primers and DNA sequencing to determine if Borrelia lonestari was present in Amblyomma americanum ticks removed from military personnel and sent to the Tick-Borne Disease Laboratory of the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine. In our preliminary investigation, we detected Borrelia sequences in 19 of 510 A. americanum adults and nymphs from Ft. A. P. Hill, Va. During the 2001 tick season, the flaB primers were used to test all A. americanum samples as they were received, and 29 of 2,358 A. americanum samples tested individually or in small pools were positive. PCRs with 2,146 A. americanum samples in 2002 yielded 26 more Borrelia-positive samples. The positive ticks in 2001 and 2002 were from Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The last positive sample of the 2001 season was a pool of larvae. To further investigate larval infection, we collected and tested questing A. americanum larvae from Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.; 4 of 33 pools (40 larvae per pool) were positive. Infection of unfed larvae provides evidence of the maintenance of B. lonestari by means of transovarial transmission. Sequence analysis revealed that the amplicons were identical to sequences of the B. lonestari flaB gene in GenBank. Despite the low prevalence of infection, the risk of B. lonestari transmission may be magnified because A. americanum is often abundant and aggressive, and many tick bite victims receive multiple bites.

PMID: 14662940 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Arch Intern Med. 1976 Jul;136(7):811-3.

Tickborne oculoglandular tularemia: case report and review of seasonal and vectorial associations in 106 cases.

Guerrant RL, Humphries MK Jr, Butler JE, Jackson RS.

A patient acquired tickborne oculoglandular tularemia in early summer in rural Virginia. Tick exposure may be a clue to the diagnosis of tularemia in the eastern as well as the western United States, especially in summer months. A review of the experience with tularemia in Virginia for the last 13 years shows a bimodal seasonal incidence of tularemia with an associated vector exposure in 77.4% of 106 cases. The majority of cases occurring during winter months have been associated with rabbit exposure, while those in summer months are often associated with tick exposure.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports

PMID: 938174 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Med Entomol. 1989 Sep;26(5):494-6.

Reduction of the Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) population at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, by aerial application of diazinon granules: correlation of percentage control with received dose.

Sardelis MR, Neidhardt K, Perich MJ, Milstrey EG, Harlan HJ, Boobar LR.

Habitat (280 ha) of lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), was aerially treated with 14% diazinon granules. Concentration of acaricide reaching the forest floor ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 kg (AI)/ha. Greater than 85% control was achieved at study plots receiving the highest dose. A positive correlation was shown between dose received at the forest floor and percentage of control of adults (r = 0.91) and nymphs (r = 0.86).

PMID: 2795622 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Va Med. 1990 Apr;117(4):160-1.

Ehrlichiosis in Virginia: case reports.

Ende M, O'Donnal PM, Ende FI, Ende M.

Ehrlichiosis is a disease that should be considered in any case of chills, fever and malaise, with or without a history of tick bites.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports

PMID: 2349832 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Am J Med Sci. 1990 Nov;300(5):283-7.

Epidemiology of Lyme disease in Virginia.

Heimberger T, Jenkins S, Russell H, Duma R.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.

Prior to January 1986, only one case of Lyme disease was reported from Virginia. In 1986-87, however, the Virginia Department of Health observed an increase in reports of suspected Lyme disease by physicians, despite the fact that Ixodes dammini is not highly prevalent in the Virginia tick population. Twenty-eight cases of Lyme disease were identified in Virginia, of which eight cases occurred in 1986 and 20 in 1987. Lyme disease appears to be increasing in frequency in Virginia and moving southward along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard.

PMID: 2240015 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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J Med Entomol. 1999 Sep;36(5):578-87.

Ticks and antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi from mammals at Cape Hatteras, NC and Assateague Island, MD and VA.

Oliver JH Jr, Magnarelli LA, Hutcheson HJ, Anderson JF.

Institute of Arthropodology & Parasitology, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro 30460, USA.

Results of a survey for ixodid ticks and/or serum antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi from 14 species of small to large mammals from eastern coastal areas of the United States are presented. Most samples were obtained from July 1987 through June 1989 (excluding December-March) at 3 locales: Assateague Is. National Seashore, Worcester Co., MD., and Accomack Co., VA. (approximately 38 degrees 05' N 75 degrees 10' W), and Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Dare Co., NC (approximately 35 degrees 30' N 76 degrees 35' W). Hosts sampled included opossums (Didelphis virginiana), least shrews (Cryptotis parva), gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), raccoons (Procyon lotor), feral cats (Felis sylvestris), feral horses (Equus caballus), sika deer (Cervus nippon), rice rats (Oryzomys palustris), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), house mice (Mus musculus), norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and jumping mice (Zapus hudsonius). An indirect fluorescent antibody test was used for testing sera from opossums, raccoons, and feral cats; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used for sera from foxes, horses, deer, and house and white-footed mice. Antibodies to B. burgdorferi were found in all species tested from each locale. Seasonal data reinforce the contention that P. leucopus is a suitable sentinel species for B. burgdorferi. Ticks on hosts included Ixodes scapularis Say, I. texanus Banks, Dermacentor variabilis (Say), D. albipictus (Packard), and Amblyomma americanum (L.). Males comprised approximately 0-22 and 60-81% of Ixodes sp. and Amblyomma-Dermacentor adults collected from hosts, respectively. All stages of A. americanum, adult D. variabilis, and larval I. scapularis were collected from vegetation. The highest seropositivity rate (67%) was recorded for 45 P. leucopus at Assateague during July, approximately 1 mo. after peak nymphal I. scapularis intensity. Borrelia burgdorferi was isolated from 6 nymphal and 12 female I. scapularis collected from P. leucopus and C. nippon, respectively, on Assateague.

PMID: 10534951 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Tincup
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Mil Med. 2001 Feb;166(2):191-3.

A Naval Academy midshipman with ehrlichiosis after summer field exercises in Quantico, Virginia.

Rooney TB, McGue TE, Delahanty KC.

Naval Ambulatory Care Center, Internal Medicine, Newport, RI 02841, USA.

A case of human ehrlichiosis (caused by infection with Ehrlichia chaffeensis) is presented. The patient was a female Naval Academy midshipman with a 26-day history of daily field training with the U.S. Marines near Quantico, Virginia. She presented with a several-day history of myalgias, fever, and frontal headache. During her clinical course, she developed fever to 104 degrees F, dry cough, dyspnea on exertion, arthralgias, and nephrotic syndrome. She did not develop a rash. Laboratory studies were significant for thrombocytopenia, equivocal Lyme enzyme immunosorbent assay with a negative confirmatory western immunoblot, equivocal Rocky Mountain spotted fever acute serology without a convalescent increase in immunoglobulin G, and immunoglobulin G/immunoglobulin M serology positive for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. She manifested known sequelae for this emerging disease, including dyspnea, pedal edema, increased transminases, and nephrotic syndrome.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports
96

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Mil Med. 2003 Dec;168(12):1011-4.

Lyme disease reporting for Navy and Marine Corps (1997-2000).

McGinnis J, Bohnker BK, Malakooti M, Mann M, Sack DM.

Preventive Medicine Directorate, Navy Environmental Health Center, 620 John Paul Jones Circle, Portsmouth, VA 23708, USA.

Reported cases of Lyme disease for Navy and Marine Corps personnel during 1997-2000 are presented from data collected in the Naval Disease Reporting System and the Defense Medical Epidemiological Database. Naval Disease Reporting System identified 210 case subjects; 60% were men, 49% were family members, and 37% were active duty, and most originated in the second quarter of the calendar year. States reporting the greatest number of reports were Connecticut (44%), North Carolina (16%), Rhode Island (10%), and Virginia (10%), which was generally consistent with national figures and the concentration of military populations. Incidence rates from Defense Medical Epidemiological Database for Lyme disease were generally higher for active duty personnel than reported civilian rates. Areas for improvement for Naval Disease Reporting System are identified and include additional emphasis on complete reporting on patient history and on Lyme disease antibody testing results. These findings suggest that Lyme disease is an important disease in military medicine, particularly in the eastern United States.

PMID: 14719627 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Ann Entomol Soc Am. 1966 Nov;59(6):1234-62.

The ecology of ticks transmitting Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a study area in Virginia.

Sonenshine DE, Atwood EL, Lamb JT Jr.

PMID: 5979107 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Med Entomol. 1991 Jan;28(1):186-9.

Parasitization of humans in West Virginia by Ixodes cookei (Acari: Ixodidae), a potential vector of Lyme borreliosis.

Hall JE, Amrine JW Jr, Gais RD, Kolanko VP, Hagenbuch BE, Gerencser VF, Clark SM.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506.

In 32 collections, two larvae, 33 nymphs, and one adult female Ixodes cookei Packard were collected from humans in West Virginia from August 1987 to May 1990. Most were attached. The ticks were found in 14 counties and were the most abundant Ixodes found biting humans. One nymphal I. cookei was removed from the left axilla of a 39-yr-old woman who lives and works in Monongalia and Marion counties, W. Va. The bite was the center of an expanding erythematous lesion reaching 4 cm in diameter, clearing centrally, and typical of erythema migrans. This association and the near absence of Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin from the state suggests the possibility that I. cookei may be an important vector of Lyme borreliosis in West Virginia. In five separate collections, five nymphal Ixodes dentatus Marx were removed from humans in four counties, implicating this species as a potential minor vector of Lyme borreliosis in West Virginia.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports

PMID: 2033612 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Med Entomol. 1970 Dec;7(6):645-54.

A contribution to the ecology of ticks infesting wild birds and rabbits in the Virginia-North Carolina Piedmont (Acarina: Ixodidae).

Sonenshine DE, Stout IJ.

PMID: 5533617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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JAMA. 1971 May 10;216(6):1003-7.

Tick-borne typhus (Rocky Mountain spotted fever). Epidemiologic trends, with particular reference to Virginia.

Peters AH.

PMID: 4995481 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


J Med Entomol. 1998 Jan;35(1):54-8.

Occurrence of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) on a selected segment of the Appalachian Trail.

Oliver J, Howard JJ.

New York State Department of Health, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse 13210, USA.

A 918-km section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail from the West Virginia-Maryland border to the Massachusetts-Vermont border was surveyed for the presence of Ixodes scapularis Say. The trail and its edges were drag-sampled during 4 hikes between May and October 1991. Trips were designed to survey areas of the Appalachian Trail when I. scapularis might be questing and to revisit states endemic for Lyme disease during differing times. After sampling for ticks, meteorological and ecological characteristics were measured at each site. In total, 1,776 km of the Appalachian Trail were hiked during 88 d and resulted in sampling 489 sites. All life stages of Ixodes scapularis (n = 46) were collected from 21 sites within a 331-km range of the Appalachian Trail between Salisbury, CT, to Delaware Water Gap, PA. This segment of Appalachian Trial is easily accessible to a large urban population and should be posted with tick warning signs to alert the public to the presence of I. scapularis.

PMID: 9542345 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1995 Aug;53(2):123-33.

Borrelia burgdorferi in eastern Virginia: comparison between a coastal and inland locality.

Sonenshine DE, Ratzlaff RE, Troyer J, Demmerle S, Demmerle ER, Austin WE, Tan S, Annis BA, Jenkins S.

Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.

In Virginia, Borrelia burgdorferi was more prevalent in a site along the Atlantic Ocean, near Maryland, than in an inland site near Williamsburg and Yorktown. At the coastal site on Assateague Island, B. burgdorferi was isolated from 4.2% of 475 animals sampled, including four species of small mammals. Serologic tests indicated that 25-37% of the small rodents assayed had been exposed to B. burgdorferi. Immunofluorescence antibody assays specific for B. burgdorferi showed spirochete infection in Ixodes scapularis and Dermacentor variabilis but not in other species of ticks also examined from this site. At another coastal site (Parramore Island), no evidence of Peromyscus leucopus was found, no immature specimens of I. scapularis were collected, and no isolations were made from numerous raccoons or small mammals sampled. Borrelia burgdorferi infection was found in one I. cookei nymph, but not in numerous specimens of I. scapularis or other tick species from this locality. At the inland site between Williamsburg and Yorktown, B. burgdorferi was isolated from two small mammal species and antibodies to B. burgdorferi were found in only 7-10% of the small mammals sampled. Ixodes scapularis were less abundant at this locality than at the Assateague Island site. Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were found in I. scapularis and a single nymph of Amblyomma americanum, but not in any of numerous specimens of four other species. Infection with B. burgdorferi was found in 20% of unfed adult I. scapularis from vegetation, but in only 0.2% of numerous adults from hunter-killed deer. Infection in immature ticks was much lower than at Assateague Island. Borrelia burgdorferi may be more prevalent along the Atlantic coast than in inland areas. Isolations, seroprevalence, immature I. scapularis densities, and spirochete infection rates in ticks were higher at the Assateague Island site than the Williamsburg/Yorktown site. Consequently, the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease may be higher in some parts of the coastal area than elsewhere in Virginia. Overall, B. burgdorferi is less intense in Virginia than in the northeastern United States.

PMID: 7677212 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Mo Med. 1990 Feb;87(2):86-8.

Lyme carditis. Severe conduction disorder.

Mukharji J, DiGrazia J, Galetto D, Vetrovec GW.

Department of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.

Lyme disease in most cases occurs in the states of Connecticut, Wisconsin, Oregon, California, Missouri and parts of the northeastern coast. Showing the exception to the rule, the authors discuss a case in which a patient acquired the disease on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports

PMID: 2304446 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Wildl Dis. 1985 Apr;21(2):149-52.

Babesia odocoilei Emerson and Wright, 1970 in white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), in Virginia.

Perry BD, Nichols DK, Cullom ES.

Pooled blood samples from six white-tailed deer from the Great Dismal Swamp in Virginia were inoculated into two splenectomized deer. A moderately severe clinical reaction ensued, characterized by a hemolytic anemia, and a Babesia found in both recipient animals was presumptively identified as B. odocoilei. This is the first reported identification of this parasite in white-tailed deer in Virginia.

PMID: 3999247 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Infect Immun. 1984 Sep;45(3):697-700.

Common and isolate-restricted antigens of Anaplasma marginale detected with monoclonal antibodies.

McGuire TC, Palmer GH, Goff WL, Johnson MI, Davis WC.

Anaplasma marginale-infected erythrocytes were examined for the presence of maturation, isolate-restricted, and isolate-common antigens by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies. A panel of 18 monoclonal antibodies was used; none of the antibodies reacted with Anaplasma ovis, Babesia bigemina, babesia bovis, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma congolense, or uninfected bovine erythrocytes. Antigens common to all six A. marginale isolates were detected by nine antibodies. Single isolates from Florida, Southern Idaho, Northern Texas, and Virginia and two isolates from Washington state had four patterns of reactivity with a second panel of nine antibodies. Antigenically distinct stages were not detected, as sequential smears taken daily during acute infection had the same pattern of reactivity. The results demonstrate antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of A. marginale and the presence of common antigens. This information allows grouping of different isolates and, more importantly, provides a method for the identification and isolation of common antigens for diagnostic tests.

PMID: 6205996 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Tincup
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Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2000 Jun 30;75(1-2):43-57.

Cyclic CD8+ lymphopenia in dogs experimentally infected with Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii.

Pappalardo BL, Brown T, Gebhardt D, Sontakke S, Breitschwerdt EB.

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA.

Until recently, it was presumed that Bartonella vinsonii only infected voles, a species of North American rodents. In April of 1993, however, our laboratory isolated a novel subspecies of B. vinsonii (B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii) from the blood of a dog diagnosed with vegetative valvular endocarditis. Subsequently, based on a seroepidemiologic survey of dogs from North Carolina and Virginia presenting for a variety of medical problems, we found evidence supporting a potentially important association between B. vinsonii and Ehrlichia canis co-infection in dogs. In the following study, eight dogs were infected with B. vinsonii: four specific pathogen free dogs and four dogs that had previously been infected with E. canis. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a cyclic elevation of the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio that correlated with cyclic CD8+ lymphopenia in all dogs infected with B. vinsonii, regardless of prior exposure to E. canis.

PMID: 10889298 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2000 Jun 30;75(1-2):43-57.

Cyclic CD8+ lymphopenia in dogs experimentally infected with Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii.

Pappalardo BL, Brown T, Gebhardt D, Sontakke S, Breitschwerdt EB.

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA.

Until recently, it was presumed that Bartonella vinsonii only infected voles, a species of North American rodents. In April of 1993, however, our laboratory isolated a novel subspecies of B. vinsonii (B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii) from the blood of a dog diagnosed with vegetative valvular endocarditis. Subsequently, based on a seroepidemiologic survey of dogs from North Carolina and Virginia presenting for a variety of medical problems, we found evidence supporting a potentially important association between B. vinsonii and Ehrlichia canis co-infection in dogs. In the following study, eight dogs were infected with B. vinsonii: four specific pathogen free dogs and four dogs that had previously been infected with E. canis. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a cyclic elevation of the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio that correlated with cyclic CD8+ lymphopenia in all dogs infected with B. vinsonii, regardless of prior exposure to E. canis.

PMID: 10889298 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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J Med Entomol. 1991 Sep;28(5):668-74.

Borrelia burgdorferi in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from coastal Virginia.

Levine JF, Sonenshine DE, Nicholson WL, Turner RT.

Department of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27606.

Ixodid ticks removed from hosts and from vegetation during March-November 1987 at sites in coastal Virginia and North Carolina were examined for Borrelia burgdorferi. B. burgdorferi was evident in nine (22%) Ixodes cookei Packard removed from rice rats (Oryzomys palustris), a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), and raccoons (Procyon lotor); four (6%) Amblyomma americanum (L.) removed from raccoons; and two (3%) Dermacentor variabilis (Say) removed from a raccoon and a rice rat. B. burgdorferi was also detected in Ixodes dentatus Marx removed from a brown thrasher (Toxostoma rufum), a Carolina wren (Thryothoros ludovicianus), and a towhee (Piplio erythrophthalamus); and in Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) removed from a brown thrasher and a white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) netted at Kiptopeke Beach, Va. Two Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin were collected on Parramore Island; one specimen was examined for spirochetes, and it was infected with B. burgdorferi. No spirochetes were detected in host-seeking A. americanum and Amblyomma maculatum Koch removed from vegetation. The plasma of one P. leucopus and sera obtained from two P. lotor contained antibodies to B. burgdorferi. All infected ticks and the seroreactive hosts were collected from the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

PMID: 1941936 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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W V Med J. 1992 Mar;88(3):102.

Lyme disease case studies.

Paulk DA.

Valley Health Care, Inc., Mill Creek, W.Va.

Lyme disease is the commonest tick-borne disease in the United States. Since the Mill Creek Clinic opened in March 1991, we have diagnosed two cases of the total five cases of Lyme disease reported in West Virginia.

Publication Types:
* Case Reports

PMID: 1574875 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Am Mosq Control Assoc. 1994 Mar;10(1):108-11.

Parasitic arthropods of white-footed mice at McClintic Wildlife Station, West Virginia.

Joy JE, Briscoe NJ.

Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755.

Seven species of parasitic arthropods (one sucking louse, one bot, 2 fleas, one tick, and 2 mites) were recovered from 81 white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, live-trapped on the grounds of the McClintic Wildlife Station, Mason County, WV, from March through November 1990. The most commonly collected arthropods were the fleas Orchopeas leucopus (89 specimens) and Epitedia wenmanni (23), and the tick Dermacentor variabilis (38). Sex ratios for both flea species were female biased; 1.8:1.0 for O. leucopus and 1.6:1.0 for E. wenmanni.

PMID: 8014620 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Ann Entomol Soc Am. 1968 May;61(3):679-86.

Use of old-field habitats by the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.

Sonenshine DE, Stout IJ.

PMID: 5655797 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1967 Jan;16(1):48-59.

Ecology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. II. Natural infection of wild mammals and birds in Virginia and Maryland.

Bozeman FM, Shiral A, Humphries JW, Fuller HS.

PMID: 6067061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Med Entomol. 1971 Dec 30;8(6):623-35.

The ecology of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), in two contrasting habitats in Virginia (Acarina: Ixodidae).

Sonenshine DE, Levy GF.

PMID: 5153583 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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J Med Entomol. 1971 Sep 30;8(3):217-27.

Ticks infesting medium-sized wild mammals in two forest localities in Virginia (Acarina: Ixodidae).

Sonenshine DE, Stout IJ.

PMID: 5118864 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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J Med Entomol. 1969 Aug;6(3):329-30.

Wild turkey ectoparasites collected in the Southeastern United States.

Kellogg FE, Prestwood AK, Gerrish RR, Doster GL.

PMID: 5820854

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Tincup
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J Med Entomol. 1998 Sep;35(5):629-38.

Reported distribution of Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the United States.

Dennis DT, Nekomoto TS, Victor JC, Paul WS, Piesman J.

Division of Vector-Borne Infection Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Fort Collins, CO 80522, USA.

Lyme disease, caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most frequently reported arthropod-borne disease in the United States. To develop a national map of the distribution of the vectors of B. burgdorferi to humans (Ixodes scapularis Say and Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls ticks), we sent questionnaires to acarologists, health officials, and Lyme disease researchers; surveyed the 1966-1996 MEDLINE data base; and reviewed 1907-1995 National Tick Collection data. Tick collection methods cited included flagging and dragging, deer surveys, small- and medium-sized mammal surveys, CO2 baiting, and receipt of tick submissions. A total of 1,058 unique, county-specific I. scapularis and I. pacificus records was obtained. Tick populations were classified as "reported" (- 6 ticks and 1 life stage identified) or "established" (+or = 6 ticks or + 1 life stage identified). Established populations of I. scapularis were identified in 396 counties in 32 states in the eastern and central United States, whereas established populations of I. pacificus were found in 90 counties in 5 western states. Counties with established populations were most concentrated in the northeastern, upper northcentral, and west-coastal states but were also clustered in southeastern and Gulf-coastal states. A less concentrated distribution was found in the south-central states. Reports were notably missing from all but a few counties in Ohio, West Virginia, western Virginia and North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee. They were absent in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain regions and from large areas of western states east of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada cordilleras. These data are useful for identifying areas of Lyme disease risk, for targeting Lyme disease prevention strategies, and for monitoring trends in spatial distribution of Lyme disease vector ticks.

PMID: 9775584

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Tincup
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There is one file.. about 17 pages. If you need more just let me know.

And do please tell the doctor that Tincup said she agrees with him 100 percent. There is no problem with ticks or Lyme disease in Virginia... not at all.

But there sure is an over abundance of STUPID DUCKS!

[Eek!]

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luvs2ride
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Yep. With my recent bite, my regular GP (local and pretty much useless)chose to not test for lyme because the tick wasn't a deer tick. He stated "only deer ticks can cause lyme". He started saying "If we were in Boston, with your bite and your symptoms...." I interrupted and said "You mean I can't even get two weeks of doxy?" He just stopped and said "Yes, I will give you the doxy". Then he told me I was scary.

Huh? Why? Because I knew it was commonsense to treat rapidly when a tick bite is followed by flu like symptoms??????

I said "There is Lyme disease in Roanoke, VA you know" He agreed.

[Roll Eyes] [Roll Eyes] [Roll Eyes]

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clpgotlyme
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I know for sure I got bitten by a tick in VA. Had bulls eye rash and CDC positive Western Blot (12 years later).

The Western Loudoun county support group is so large it has been split into 3 areas!There is a lot of Lyme in VA.

I believe there are several areas in VA that have some of the fastest growing numbers in the country.
Cindy

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breathwork
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My first tick bites were in Newport News, VA...I found the tick, removed it, had it tested (positive), had bulls eye, and was diagnosed and reported to the health department. My PCP would only treat for three weeks.

Fortunately, I had a doctor friend, one who went to high school with me, who agreed to continue to prescribe for me. He lived in another state, but I visited my parents there to keep it legal for him.


This bite was the last in a string of bites on the tops of my feet in my organic garden there. I had bulls eye rashes on my feet for years every summer...I didn't know about lyme disease in the early nineties...I thought it was ring worm...Silly me.

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robi
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Thank you all for speakingof Lyme in VA ..... and not just northern VA. It is on the coast, in central VA and the western area if VA.........

Thanks TC for all the citations I have copied and will and to my files. You are the best.

robi

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sizzled
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[Eek!]

Whoa!!!

Way to go Tincup!!!! [bow]

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