LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » New Malaria Research

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: New Malaria Research
seibertneurolyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 6416

Icon 1 posted      Profile for seibertneurolyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This info seems very relevant for Babesia. Wonder if Babs has the same RESA protein? I remember the Dr B telling hubby that one reason babs caused symptoms was because it makes the red blood cell membranes stiff and "deformable" -- red blood cells are supposed to be able to fold up so they can go thru the capillaries.

Bea Seibert
-------------------------------------------------

http://www.medindia.net/news/Why-Malaria-Parasites-Affects-Red-Blood-Cells-Deformability-Revealed-21371.htm

Why Malaria Parasite Affects Red Blood Cells' Deformability Revealed

A study led by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has found out why red blood cells start to lose their ability to deform, and squeeze through tiny blood vessels during the first 24 hours of invasion by the malaria-inducing parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

The researchers knocked out the gene for a parasite protein called RESA (ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen), and found that the protein, transferred from the parasite to the cell's interior molecular network, had caused red blood cells to become less deformable.

"This is the first time a particular protein has been shown to have such a large effect on red blood cell deformability," said Subra Suresh, Ford Professor of Engineering and senior author of the study.

According to the researchers, their findings may lead to the development of treatments that target the parasite protein.

The RESA protein has long been suspected to be involved in the early stages of that process. The parasite produces RESA during the first stage of malaria, and then transports it to the cell surface.

During the study, the researchers cloned the parasite, knocked out the gene that produces RESA, and then measured the red blood cells' deformability with "optical tweezers" that use lasers to stretch cell membranes.

The deformability remained normal in red blood cells infected by parasites without RESA during the first 24 hours of infection, while in parasites where RESA was turned back on after being knocked out, it was affected in a manner as though the protein was never knocked out.

"That the deformability changed several-fold was a big surprise," said Suresh.

Published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study also found that RESA has a much greater impact on the deformability of red blood cells at high fever temps than in normal body temperature.

The researchers believe that when RESA travels to the cell membrane, it binds to the cell's cytoskeleton--a scaffolding of proteins that lies just inside the cell membrane.

In future studies, the researchers plan to study the effects of proteins produced by the malaria parasite during later stages of infection. They also plan to look at whether the RESA protein plays any role in why another strain of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax, is less lethal than P. falciparum.

Posts: 7306 | From Martinsville,VA,USA | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tincup
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5829

Icon 14 posted      Profile for Tincup         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Very interesting!

My momma had maleria. NOT something that you want to have hang around... for sure.

Hope they have a fix for it soon!

[Big Grin]

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

Posts: 20353 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Not so easy...

Plasmodium falciparum is a protozoan parasite, one of the species of Plasmodium that cause malaria in humans.

Culvenor, J. G., K. P. Day, and R. F. Anders. 1991.

Plasmodium falciparum
ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen is released from merozoite dense
granules after erythrocyte invasion. Infect. Immun. 59:1183-1187.

Fandeur T, Vazeux G, Mercereau-Puijalon O. 1993. The virulent Saimiri-adapted Palo Alto strain of Plasmodium falciparum does NOT express the ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen. Mol Biochem Parasitol 60:241-248.

But....

Cord factor (trehalose 6-6' dimycolate). COAM (chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose), zymosan, glucan, Salmonella enteritidis 11RX and Listeria monocytogenes were found to protect mice against

subsequent infection with Babesia microti, an intra-erythrocytic protozoan parasite.

This protection was not observed after injection of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a viridans group Streptococcus, thioglycollate, or colloidal carbon. All the agents which protect against B. microti have also been reported to induce non-specific protection against experimental tumours. The parasites appear to die inside circulating red cells. This implies that these can exert non-specific protection against this parasite through the mediation of a soluble factor.
PMID: 121772

Glucan?


A glucan molecule is a polysaccharide of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. The following are glucans:

cellulose, β-1,4-glucan
laminarin, β-1,3- and β-1,6-glucan
pullulan, α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucan
starch, α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucan
glycogen, α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucan
dextran, α-1,6-glucan
lichenin

Bea...D-ribose converts to D- glucose for our brain and D-galactose for our body.

This is what I've been talking about.

Now...add gelatin...good old gelatin...a complete protein.

And get a far infrared sauna.

Posts: 9424 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vanilla
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Does anyone know if Malaria and Babesia cross test?

I have spent a lot of time in Malaria hot spots.

Thank you,

Vanilla Swirl not Squirrel

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GiGi
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 259

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GiGi         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=050278
Posts: 9834 | From Washington State | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
?

"Antigenic similarities between Plasmodium and Babesia parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa have been previously demonstrated primarily by the serological cross reactivity observed in the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test.

We have now studied the antigenic relationship between the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and the hemoparasitic agent of cattle, Babesia bovis, using rabbit monospecific antibodies produced against individual culture-derived P. falciparum polypeptides and bovine polyspecific antibodies to B. bovis exoantigens.

These respective antibodies were found to be distinctly cross reactive in the IFA test using infected erythrocytes (squirrel monkey--P. falciparum; bovine--B. bovis) as antigen substrates. Immunofluorescence was shown to be highly specific for parasite surfaces.

Additionally, the degree of reactivity with soluble exoantigens contained in Plasmodium and Babesia culture supernatants was monitored by a two-site enzyme immunoassay employing the cross-reactive antibodies.

Further evidence for antigenic cross reactivity between P. falciparum and B. bovis parasites was shown with the in vitro inhibition assay. Antibodies to P. falciparum and B. bovis were found to be highly inhibitory for the in vitro growth of P. falciparum in human erythrocytes."

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1550-7408.1987.tb03184.x?journalCode=jeu

"The indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA) using B. microti parasites as antigen detects antibodies in 88-96% of patients with B. microti infection. IFA antigen slides are prepared using washed, parasitized erythrocytes produced in hamsters. Patients' titers generally rise to greater than or equal to 1:1024 during the first weeks of illness and decline gradually over 6 months to titers of 1:16 to1:256, but may remain detectable at low levels for a year or more. Specificity is 100% in patients with other tick-borne diseases or persons not exposed to the parasite. Cross-reactions may occur in serum specimens from patients with malaria infections, but generally titers are highest with the homologous antigen.

The extent of cross-reactivity between Babesia species is variable. A negative result with B. microti antigen for a patient exposed on the West Coast may be a false-negative reaction for Babesia infection. Individuals whose exposure could have occurred on the West Coast should be tested also for antibodies to the Babesia WA1 species, because of the lack of cross-reactivity with B. microt."

http://www.geocities.com/ldbullseye/babesiosis.html

Posts: 9424 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vanilla
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
One day while I was at Igenex when I asked about this subject I was told that the tests for the different types/species of Babesia WA1 microti do cross react.

First I was testing posive for WA1 and then negative while on Mepron and now I am reactive to Babesia microti. My LLMD feels it is my same case of Babesia that I had before ever starting treatment and that it is cross testing.

I heard it there - Igenex.... from a very reliable source.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Brain needs D-galactose.

Body needs D-galactose.

It looks like we need both...however,

"D-Glucose is the principal carbohydrate metabolite in animal nutrition; it is utilized by the tissues, and it is absorbed from the alimentary tract in greater amounts than any other monosaccharide. Glucose could serve satisfactorily in meeting at least 50% of the entire energy needs of humans and various animals."

Posts: 9424 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jasonsmith
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 10914

Icon 1 posted      Profile for jasonsmith     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Vanilla:
One day while I was at Igenex when I asked about this subject I was told that the tests for the different types/species of Babesia WA1 microti do cross react.

First I was testing posive for WA1 and then negative while on Mepron and now I am reactive to Babesia microti. My LLMD feels it is my same case of Babesia that I had before ever starting treatment and that it is cross testing.

I heard it there - Igenex.... from a very reliable source.

What's the difference between the two?
Posts: 310 | From TN | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vanilla
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Marnie what is that ? Is it a supplement and what is it for exactly?

In the words of Gilda Radner "Never mind"

I saw your post above and finished reading the whole thing.

I guess it is beta glucan.

How much should one take per day and what form because I know there is more then one?

Thanks,

Vanilla

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vanilla
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good question - anyone know?

There is suppose to be more Babesia WA1 on the West coast of the USA then microti.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
D-ribose is a FIVE carbon chain (most are 6)...it is needed to make RNA...which converts to DNA.

(D-ribose can convert to D-glucose and D-galactose.)

D-ribose is avail. OTC.

RNA differs from DNA in ONE aspect only...it has one extra oxygen molecule.

Does this lone oxygen molecule combine with a free radical (another lone oxygen molecule) to make O2?

I'm not a biochemist!

However, NOW ... RECENTLY...they are giving cardiac patients D-ribose pre op and finding tremendous benefits.

Do you know our brain cells need 1/4 # of sugar per day to be converted into the chemical form of energy, ATP.

(Stated in a book I got with my Juvenon monthly supply. That blew me away...1/4 POUND!)

How much D-ribose, how often? I don't have a clue.

BTW...Bb is only using OUR ADP, NOT ATP...

Posts: 9424 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
seibertneurolyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 6416

Icon 1 posted      Profile for seibertneurolyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Marnie,

Any idea why D5W by IV would cause hubby's tremors/myoclonus and freezing-up spells to be much worse?

ER had gotten things calmed down one day last week with IV Ativan and IV Zofran plus a couple of liters of normal saline I think it was. Within about 5 minutes of starting the D5W drip all the goofy symptoms came back. ER doc was confused but agreed to discontinue D5W and tremor etc stopped on their own within about 15 minutes. Doc discharged hubby ASAP while he was stable.

I know some people have advised against using D5W for Lyme patients. I have always used it with hubby's IV antibiotics. A previous PCP said that the D5W would cause the antibiotics to go to the brain better. Any thoughts or opinions?

Bea Seibert

Posts: 7306 | From Martinsville,VA,USA | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GiGi
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 259

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GiGi         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
unlike glucose and ribose, galactose, the brain sugar, enters the cells independently of insulin.
The galactose is converted quantitatively into glucose, thereby providing sufficient substrate for both biosynthesis ( maintenance of cell structure and for energy metabolism. In this way the harmful decrease in the supply of glucose to the Central Nervous System can be bypassed ---- by taking galactose.

The average intake of galactose is 9 grams (3 grams after each meal) daily.

Take care.

Posts: 9834 | From Washington State | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code� is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.