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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Cognitive deficits in mice reversed

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shazdancer
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Mice with Alzheimer's disease have had their brain symptoms reversed by the use of antibiotics.

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CaliforniaLyme
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Great post Shaz- but it's antibodies- not antibiotics!!! Amazing stuff though-
*********************************

Cognitive deficits in mice reversed
ST. LOUIS, Oct. 8 (UPI) -- U.S. and Israeli researchers have reversed the progression of Alzheimer's disease in mice by injecting them with a specific class of antibodies.

The immunoglobulin M, or IgM, antibodies attach to the amyloid beta protein and prevent the protein from changing into the toxic substance that is thought to cause Alzheimer's disease.

Dr. William A. Banks of Saint Louis University said the finding is surprising because scientists had believed IgM antibodies were too large to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, researchers found a single intravenous dose of IgM reversed cognitive impairment in aged mice with a genetic mutation that causes deficits similar to those found in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

The study, conducted in collaboration with Michael Steinitz of Hebrew University in Jerusalem, was reported in the August issue of the journal Experimental Neurology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International. All Rights Reserved.

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