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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Eleuthero whole herb X tincture?

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Author Topic: Eleuthero whole herb X tincture?
hardynaka
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Is there anyone who tried both eleutherococcus tincture and whole herb to tell the difference?

Was the tincture from fresh herb or dried herb?

Thanks for any info,
Selma

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Keebler
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I've used all type of this. Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) is so helpful for my aldrenals - a good support, but not wired out like on caffeine. This is not related to ginseng other than it has similar qualities of support for adrenals. Ginseng may be a little too stimulating for some whereas this is less so - for myself, anyway.

I actually like the capsules best. I try to avoid the alcohol tinctures as I think the alcohol gives my adrenals a rush and then a drop but just a sniff of any sort of alcohol does that to me.

Tinctures are stronger medicine, condensed, and work faster than raw herbs. Extracts in capsules may be equal to tincture strength, but that may depend upon the herb. I don't know if capsules would have a longer, more steady action or not.

Info. on dosage and type in this book excerpt from THE ONE EARTH HERBAL SOURCEBOOK by Alan Tillotson, Ph.D., D. Ay., et.al. home: http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com

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http://tinyurl.com/2stbql

SIBERIAN ELEUTHERO ROOT BARK (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

Latin: Eleutherococcus senticosus photo

WHAT IT DOES: Siberian eleuthero (formerly called Siberian ginseng) is sweet and slightly pungent in taste, and neutral in action. It nourishes the adrenal glands, supports liver metabolism and increases energy and endurance against stress and pollution.

RATING: Gold

SAFETY ISSUES: None known. In rare instances it may over-stimulate or slightly raise blood pressure. There is a remote possibility that it's mild anti-platelet aggregation effects might interact with blood-thinning medications.

STARTING DOSAGE:

* Powdered 5:1 extract: 500-100 mg two to three times per day

* 1:2 tincture: 30 drops three times per day.

Siberian eleuthero is the herb for which the word adaptogen was coined. It is one of the medicines we use most frequently in the clinic, because it really helps fight stress-induced fatigue. It increases general vitality, strength, endurance and the ability to overcome the effects of long-term illness. We prefer it to ginseng root in sensitive individuals who may find the stronger herb too hot or overly stimulating to the nervous system.

Siberian eleuthero has been shown to delay stress reactions during the alarm phase of stress. When we are alarmed, our adrenal glands release corticosteroids and adrenaline that trigger the fight or flight reaction. If these hormones are depleted by short- or long-term stress, we develop adrenal exhaustion.

Siberian eleuthero delays the onset of the exhaustive phase by causing a more efficient release of these hormones into our system (Pearce et al., 1982; Brunner et al., 1990; Fulder, 1980; reported in Farnsworth, 1989).

Several negative studies have been published since the original Russian research (Lewis et al., 1983, Dowling et al. 1996). However, my own personal experience and that of my patients shows Siberian ginseng to be very effective in a majority of those who take it.

I have spoken with suppliers, and they tell me that much of the Siberian eleuthero used in America is made from the whole root, while the original Russian studies were performed using the root bark. If you find a good supply, the results should be immediately obvious. Consistent personal results always trump poorly designed scientific studies.

Research Highlights

* In a placebo-controlled study of the effects of a Siberian eleuthero extract on the immune system of healthy individuals, researchers reported ``a drastic increase in the absolute number of immunocompetent cells, with an especially pronounced effect on T lymphocytes.'' In addition, they observed a general enhancement of the activation state in T-lymphocytes (Bohn et al., 1987).

* According to translations of original Russian research, Siberian eleuthero has the ability to increase our endurance and capacity to work by improving the ability of the liver and adrenals to regulate hormonal levels, dispose of lactic acid, and regulate blood sugar (reported in Farnsworth et al., 1989).

* Russian telegraph operator were able to increase the number of messages they could handle by taking about 60 drops of a Siberian eleuthero tincture daily (reported in Farnsworth et al., 1989).

* Factory workers taking about 60 drops of a Siberian eleuthero tincture daily recorded a 50% reduction in illness and a 40% reduction in lost work days (reported in Farnsworth et al., 1989).

click tab on left to see references (at link above)

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hardynaka
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Keebler!! Thanks for your post!!

I already take the powdered version, and was just thinking if I should shift to tincture or keep my whole herb as usual.

So, if I understood well, you don't feel any difference between powder and tincture, except for the problem of alcohol?

I dont have the problem of alcohol, I even like it [Smile]

Serious... I 'd like to know if in tincture, the effect would be the same, let's say, to a 40% tincture!!

Thanks!

Selma

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Keebler
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From what I've learned from many NDs over the years is that tincture is the best form. Strongest and deeper acting.

If you have no problem with alcohol - and you;ve used this and it works well for you - then my guess is that the tincture will be better. If this were an antimicrobial that you wanted to be sure to get an exact amount and know how deep that would go, I'd consult several sources. As a support herb, though, how you feel can tell you much about what your body likes (or doesn't) about it.

For some, such as skullcap, certain forms are not effective.
. ( " . . . Dried scullcap, commonly found in over-the-counter herbal preparations, is basically inert, and therefore useless. The related Chinese herb scute root is more anti-inflammatory and less calming in action. . . . ") from the scullcap page at http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/

I don't see exactly what I was looking for, but this might also help:

http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/growth-storage/

Good Medicine Tip - Shelf Lives of Herbal Products

The shelf life of a product should be stamped on the container. If it is not, these general guidelines can be used:

* Crude herbs stored in tightly closed containers made of plastic or dark glass will retain their properties for at least six months if they are placed in a cool, dark, dry location.

* Alcohol-based liquid tinctures are usually good for up to three years. They may still be good for several more years, but different chemicals in the tincture may cause subtle changes over time, as wine bottlers well know. For this reason I keep tinctures for a maximum of three years.

* Glycerin-based herb tinctures are good for six months to one year.

* Capsules and tablets should be used within three to six months of opening, and within one year of manufacture.

* Salves and oils are good for six months to one year, and should be stored in the refrigerator after you get them home.

.

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hardynaka
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Keebler, I was just into the interesting website you posted above. Great info on herbs!!!

I was going to post the PHELLODENDRON page, but I couldn't (dont' ask me why, a problem with HTML tag or something like that?).

Have you seen this info on phellodendron? It was one of the best herbs I used for co-infections. I'm glad they say 'very wide antimicrobial effect' or something similar. I'm a full believer! This herb and gardenia were so much helpful for me, for quite some time.

http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/important-herbs/phellodendron-bark-phellodendron-amurense.html

Even Pubmed did an article on it, with its anticancerigenous actions and immunopotentiating effects!!!

Another interesting herb in the website you posted is St. Johns' Wort. The more I know this herb (any type of product, tincture, powder, tea), the more I 'respect' it.

It's so wide-spectrum, specially for viruses but not only, so helpful for lyme disease co-infections!! And even the most common of colds it gets! My whole family is on it, from times to times. Tincture is good, homeopathics are good, tea is good, powder is good!!

Same as 'astragalus', an incredible plant for our immune system!
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As for eleuthero, it's not for specific infections, just to keep myself in good shape when I stop this treatment I'm on (I got a small setback of borrelia, I believe, with bart and rickettsia). I guess sleeping 4.5 hours a night for a month was not a good idea.... [bonk]

I loved eleuthero while I was on it. I even think it acted almost directly to kill fungi in my case. But it's a guess. I stopped to take it for a while, but I think I'll get back to it, I'm just thinking which form to buy (or if I buy powder and make tincture myself anyway).

Selma

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Keebler
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Selma,

then you - or others interested in the history of herbs - might like the ITM site www.itmonline.org

You can stroll around their site and find lots of articles.

It's a research body but most of the herbs or formulas they mention are available world-wide through acupuncturists and naturopathic physicians. You can check on their referral list to see if anyone near you is in their registry. (I just looked, though, no Switz or even EU names. There used to be but maybe that's a different page.)

I.T.M. - Seven Forests - or White Tiger formulas
European Distribution
biomed b.v. Postbus 107
NL - 4645 ZJ Putte


Many of the artilces at ITM are good to explain about herbs, how they work, how our bodies work, etc. I could study this site all day if I could sit up that long.

If you can, you might be interested in the article on GU SYNDROME. Gu (goo), historically, is a collection of various pathogens, none of which is easy to detect. in this article, the ancient TCM terms of heat and evil equal infection, disease sort of thing.

www.classicalchinesemedicine.org/downloads/cs/gufinal.pdf

8 page download. This used to be easy to find. Now this was the only place I could find it. You might want to print it out if this site disappears. Since it's a pdf it can't copy. You can save it, but if the site changes, it won't come up.

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[ 01. December 2007, 10:33 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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susan2health
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I've used it for awhile. It does help energy/adrenals immensely, and it does also make me more hypogylcemic.

I've used HerbPharm tincture (very strong and even at half price in a large bottle fairly expensive), home made (inexpensive), and the Nature's Way standardized caps.

Like some other tinctures, it is fairly dark and a little staining to the teeth. I add 1 Tablespoon boiling water to each dropperful, let set till cool, and drink with a straw that is held to the back of my throat to minimize teeth staining.

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hardynaka
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KEEBLER, many thanks again for the sites. I already printed the article and will take a look at it! It looks very interesting!!

I can buy 7 Forest products or separate herbs, but I have to import these. I found out that when I can buy products that are imported here in Europe, they are more expensive than if I import them directly!

Thanks again!

SUSAN, do you feel lots of difference between the Herb Pharm and home made tincture?

Thanks
Selma

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susan2health
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Herb Pharm is much stronger (8X, I think). Buhner says that Herb Pharm is more energizing, but the lower dose stuff is more healing to adrenals.
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Keebler
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I love Herb Pharm products. I use their cat's claw tincture and ashwaghanda, and several others. I think they are one of the shining stars in their field.

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hardynaka
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Thank you Susan and Keebler again!!

Selma

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CherylSue
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Any one else have experience with eleuthero (aka Siberian Ginseng)? Stephen Harrod Buhner in his book HEALING LYME sings its praises. I will probably take it along with ABX. I was wondering how long you took it (supposed to take 2 week breaks after 30 days) and if it helped you with energy and well being?

Thanks,
CherylSue

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