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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Anti-depressants-pro and cons

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Author Topic: Anti-depressants-pro and cons
amkdiaries
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I have been resistant to taking any anti-depressant medication throughout this entire illness but I feel as though I might have to. I have been afraid of side effects and loss of personality but I am starting to feel differently.

Even the strongest people have a limit and I think I have reached mine. Can anyone tell me of their experiences-either positive or negative with some of the popular anti-depressants?

Dealing with this illness as well as the stress of family can take you to the brink and may cause someone never to recover. I tried counseling but it didn't really help. Thanks!

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Aniek
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I've never tried antidepressants for depression, just for pain control. So my personal experiences don't relate to your situation.

But, I have a friend whose life was saved by going on antidepressants. She was ready to take her own life before she was put on prozac. This was back when we were in college and she no longer needs the medication.

--------------------
"When there is pain, there are no words." - Toni Morrison

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MusicMan
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Hi there [Smile]

I feel your pain and I say try it and if you don't like it just tell your Doctor you don't like it.
I like to be totally in control with my Doctors and I let them know that up front, I mean you kind of have to these days.

But, back to the subject.
I tried at least 7 different anti-depressants and every single one gave me a bad stomach ache so finally I gave up and take Clonazepam.

I take the smallest dose they make and cut that in half, I do this for the really bad anxiety attacks.

But yes, I do think you should at least give it a go.

Steve

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adamm
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Make sure you have a psychiatrist to monitor you

if you start taking them. Withdrawal from Anafranil (a tricyclic)

was hell for me.


As for the pro's and con's--well, I feel that Anafranil helped

with the brain fog and depression, but I read somewhere that all

the

antidepressants are imunosuppressive, and some think

that if you stay on them long enough, the receptors affected

will be treated as defective by your body and destroyed

(I think a Dr. Cheney wrote on this). But I'm certainly

no expert, so, again, just make sure you have a psychiatrist.

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MusicMan
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Sorry

Double post [Smile]

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amkdiaries
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I thought antidepressants would help the immune system by allowing things e.g. stress not to get to you as much.

I don't want to feel numb but reacting to everything that the disease does to you as well as dealing with insurance,labs,specialists,etc on a continual basis wears you down.

If there is a better way to cope I'd like to hear it.

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jkmom
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I don't have Lyme but I did take Lexapro for about 1 1/2 years. It made a huge difference for me. I did not feel numb or that my personality changed. It did decrease my anxiety and I wasn't as irritable or tired. I stopped taking it when I didn't need it any more. I was able to stop it without any problems.

My daughter, who does have Lyme, tried 5 different SSRI's and Anafranil and had to stop taking them all because of side effects. She has taken Elavil for what we thought were migraines for 2 years without any problems.

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tailz
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If you take antidepressants, no doctor will ever take you seriously again - even if you are dying right in front of them.
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jkmom
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I want to add to my previous post that taking the Lexapro convinced me that brain chemistry matters. It isn't about strength and ability to cope with stress. I just didn't feel as much stress when I took the Lexapro.
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amkdiaries
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If I do decide to take an anti-depressant I probably wouldn't tell my doctors but after everything I have been through I think they would understand.
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mtree
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amk......

i am a pro-antideppresants......

I resisted taking them for years.....

finaly when life was doom and gloom I decided i had nothing to loose.....

i was afraid that they were happy pills.....or that i was weak.........or crazy........etc.

I have been seeing a very well known phyciatrist who has plublished all kinds of articuls about lyme....

some of his articules you can find on this website.....i can tell you his name on a pm if you want......Dr.R.B...

although he has had me on a few different ones over the years......he really tries to zero in on whats causing the deppression....

lack of delta 4 sleep......pain........
all sorts of reasons for depression......

all sorts of different antidepresants....
just like all kinds of antibiotics....

trusting your doctor is very important and although i have an excellent LLD......it is important to have a Lyme Literate phyciatrist.

once i started to take them......
i felt like me again......it was alomost like the lyme had taken everything away.....including

my personality...
they are not happy pills.....just felt like me.

I can pm you ones that i have been on and why.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

tailz....you said.....

If you take antidepressants, no doctor will ever take you seriously again - even if you are dying right in front of them.

i totaly disagree with you.

infact some doctors would think you are crazy for not getting the right help you need for whatever you needed it for.

some doctors think we're crazy for being on so many antibiotics for long periods of time or even at all.

I would run if i found a dr that thought i was crazy for being on antidepressants.

just my 2 cents.....
[Smile] mtree

--------------------
worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by tailz:
If you take antidepressants, no doctor will ever take you seriously again - even if you are dying right in front of them.

I disagree bigtime. I've never had trouble with drs believing me about anything.

I don't think my anti-depressant has changed my personality at all. It made me be able to SLEEP!

Now that said...I've never taken SSRI's...only tricyclics like Pamelor, nortriptyline, and now Trazodone.

Trazodone gives me the sleep I need and also helps with pain.

The only downside to taking it is that I have to take it with food.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Clarissa
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I would not be remotely sane if it were not for my Luvox and Xanax (only needed during treatments and PRE-Lyme/Bart diagnoses).

I'm not ashamed, my LLMD knows and approves...especially with Bart, especially with a chronic illness.

My goodness, cut yourselves some slack! It's not cracked cocaine...it's a band-aid to get you through one of the worst life-altering experiences you'll ever have!

Once you've found the right one for you, it helps SO much.

**My only advice would be to avoid Paxil or anything time-released...both horrific experiences for me.

Best,

Clarissa

--------------------
Clarissa

Because I knew you:
I have been changed for good.

 -

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mojo
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I've taken the antidepressant Paxil since 1994 and it's changed my life. Depression and anxiety run in my family not to mention the added symptoms from the Lyme.

I've always been honest with all my Dr's regardng my meds and have never had a problem.

The negatives of Paxil: Can effect sex drive (that was temporary for me and compared to how I felt prior to taking the drug I barely noticed), Can cause weight gain or loss, thurst, sweating, loose stools and I can't remember but there is probaly more.

The pros are: I no longer have social anxiety and I am not nearly as anxious as I was my entire life. The negative side effects for me were temporary - although the sweating lasted a couple of years. I was just a little warmer than most people, not a big deal.

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chamade
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quote:
Originally posted by tailz:
If you take antidepressants, no doctor will ever take you seriously again - even if you are dying right in front of them.

I found that not to be the case. I take tricyclics for pain and had no problems with doctors.

However if you mention to a doctor that you are allergic to electricity.... [Smile]

--------------------
Why me? Well, why not me???

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adamm
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My LLMD was absolutely pro-me being on antidepressants,

BTW.

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Clarissa
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Interesting about the paxil...just goes to show you no one cookie cutter answer for anyone!

--------------------
Clarissa

Because I knew you:
I have been changed for good.

 -

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MusicMan
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Forgot

My Wife takes Paxil and has no problems at all with it.
She does not have Lyme, but depression runs in her family.

Steve

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Visual Afterimage Man
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I'm pro antidepressant too.

I took Paxil CR (controlled release) for 7 months prior to knowing that I had Lyme. It really helped get me back to feeling like myself. It didn't help with the Lyme symptoms, but I was able to feel peace once again.

It was a very difficult drug to stop. It took me two weeks to feel normal again once I stopped. And I did taper down slowly. I think that Paxil is a great drug, but I would try something that is easier to stop. If that doesn't do the trick then you could try paxil.

I'm currently on Lexapro. It's really starting to help me. I've been on for three weeks, so I'm just now starting to feel the effects. It is soooo nice to feel like ME again.
Its nice to have a positive outlook on the world. My mood can greatly change my day.

Don't be afraid to try them. If you are feeling like you are at your wits end, there is no reason to suffer through this when you can get relief!

I haven't noticed many side effects.

--------------------
26 months of treatment. And counting.......

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Keebler
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-

Does magnesium help ? I find it quite helpful but, of course, would love an instant calming pill - I just can't tolerate even tiny amounts of anything.,


I had some horrible reactions to several antidepressants in the early 90's. Prozac, Effexor, amitryptoline (sp?), and many others.

I find dark chocolate to be the best now.

Gotu Kola is also very good for me. It also takes toxins out of the blood.

I think much depression can be attributed to nutrient needed, toxins or chemical exposures, as well as to how well the liver is working.

Low blood sugar and adrenal exhaustion, too. (Cordyceps helps me there).


www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

Gotu Kola - 93 abstracts


Gotu Kola, depression - 5 abstracts


=======================

This book might be of interest:

THE BETTER BRAIN BOOK

http://inutritionals.com/betterbrainbook.php

http://www.inutritionals.com/

http://inutritionals.com/brainsustain.php


at the bottom of this page, you can see a video of Dr. Perlmutter on an "Oprah" program.

David Perlmutter, MD, FACN is a Board-Certified Neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition . . . Dr. Perlmutter was awarded the 2002 Linus Pauling Award for his pioneering work in innovative approaches to neurological disorders. . . .

Excepts:

* Coenzyme Q-10 measurably increases the efficiency of cellular energy production, as demonstrated in studies performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital.1 In addition, it serves as a potent brain antioxidant. These effects explain why major institutions worldwide are vigorously evaluating coenzyme Q10 as a therapeutic aid in brain disorders.


* Alpha Lipoic Acid provides powerful antioxidant action and regenerates other important brain antioxidants including vitamins E, C, and glutathione. Unlike other antioxidants, alpha lipoic acid is both fat- and water-soluble, greatly enhancing its ability to be absorbed from the gut and penetrate into the brain.2

* N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) dramatically increases the body's production of glutathione, one of the brain's most important antioxidants. NAC itself is a potent antioxidant shown to reduce formation of nitric oxide, a free radical implicated for a causative role in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.3

* Acetyl-L-Carnitine, like coenzyme Q-10, enhances neuronal energy production by transporting fuel sources into the mitochondria -- the energy producing machinery of the neuron. This particularly benefits damaged brain neurons, which are characterized by decreased energy production.

In addition, acetyl-L-carnitine acts as an effective antioxidant and been demonstrated to protect laboratory animals from developing parkinsonism when they are exposed to chemicals known to induce the condition.4 A report in a recent issue of Neurology found that acetyl-L-carnitine profoundly reduces the rate of progression of Alzheimer's disease in younger patients.5

* Vitamin E exhibits profound ability to limit free radical damage in the brain -- the likely explanation of why it outperformed a highly touted "Alzheimer's drug" in clinical trials reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.6


Diets rich in Vitamin E have been shown to reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease by an incredible 61%,7 and to dramatically slow disease progression in already-diagnosed patients when supplemented with vitamin C.8


* Gingko biloba, one of the most extensively studied nutritional supplements for neurodegenerative conditions, directly improves brain metabolism, increases brain blood flow, and provides antioxidant action.


In a placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Gingko biloba not only stabilized Alzheimer's disease, but in addition, many subjects demonstrated an actual improvement noted in various standardized psychological tests.9


* Vitamin D may have even greater ability than vitamin E to quench brain free radicals, as described in several reports. Deficiencies of vitamin D have been found in cases of Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis.10


* Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin) is critical for maintaining myelin, the protective coat surrounding each neuron. As with Vitamin D, Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with neurodegenerative conditions.


* Phosphatidylserine produces marked memory and learning improvements in demented patients, according to research conducted at Stanford University.11 Like acetyl-L-carnitine and coenzyme Q-10, phosphatidylserine plays an important role in neuronal energy production and chemical communication.


-

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D Bergy
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While I was treating my Crohn's with 2000mg of Turmeric and Ginger, my depression I had all of my life, went away. I have often said that I traded my depression for Crohn's because of this reaction. I also have since found out that Fish oil is supposed to help. All these can help Lyme and health in general anyway, so it can't hurt to try it out.

If you are on Blood thinners, you should ask your doctor if you can take Turmeric as it can thin the blood slightly.

As Crohn's results in deficient intestinal function it is possible this is why it helped me by improving this aspect, so it could be different for Lyme disease.

D Bergy

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blackpowder
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I have been on the fence myself as to whether or not to ask for anti-depressants. BUT...if you do decide to take them you relly need to tell your doc. They need to know what you're taking so they don't prescribe anything else that is not compatible.(I hope I didn't just double-negative myself into oblivion)

Some drug interactions are painful , some are flat out deadly. You've got to be your own advocate. Good luck

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Keebler
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-

And, actually, B12 shots are a great antidepressant for me.

Amazing how when I get a shot I just feel so much better, and that includes mood.


-

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lyme in Putnam
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I can't stress to you how anafranil and rocephin gave me my life back. I was on ssri's for about 2 years and that gave me the salt condition

called hyponutremia. I can't take ssri's anymore, but I take anafranil which is a

tricyclic. I cut down the dose myself when I felt I didn't have to be on that high a dose

(150 mg was what I was on - I cut it down myself to 100)with consulting my psychiatrist. 50 is

therapeutic. I found a therapist and llmd that I really like and with the grace of God, am

functioning. I was scared for years that I might be numb and I was for a long time, but I

realized that my numbness was from my anxiety of me being on ssri's... Sometimes I get down that

I don't get down deep to my "psyche" but maybe that's a blessing with all that goes on

everyday. I know its there because I cry, but I feel as if I can't feel as deep as I used to.

Just something for you to consider. It can sometimes make you find inner strength that it

seems to everyone that you always had and you know you have. You wouldn't have survived alot

of things if you weren't strong. I'm on orals now, but who knows when I'll be back on iv. I

just take advantage of everyday God gives me that I feel well and hope I'd never get to the

place where I was a few years ago. If it happens again, God forbid, I trust my doctors

and I guess I am kind of strong to be functioning. I'm just grateful when another day

is done and I feel back to myself. I know with this it can change in a moment. When you're in

pain constantly physically, mentally and/or both, and don't have alot of diversions,

everything and what everyone does wrong is magnified by millions. It doesn't seem as

drastic when you're distracted. Although you're in pain, maybe your mindset will be different

that the pain might not be as bad. Just something to think about. It's not the answer

for everyone, but it helped me.

Lyme in Putnam

--------------------
He took u to it, He'll you through

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dontlikeliver
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Amk,

I was where you are, very recently. I started Flouxetine 2 weeks ago. Might be too early to tell the effects, but I am already feeling less stressed. Same problems are still there as before, but my reaction to them is just more relaxed. Whether that's the meds or not I don't know, but I tend to think it is because I usually don't feel this 'easy-going'.

My personality feels no different, etc....but have been super-tired, which might be a side-effect while I'm still getting used to it.

DLL

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catalysT
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Welp, anti-depressants have their ups and downs. They are still FAR from any panacae (no miracle happy pills sorry). Some are better than others in my opinion. It's best to research them as much as possible, and discuss your research and concerns with your doctor, and in my opinion, especially with other people who have taken the drugs.

I've only taken escitalopram (lexapro), and sertraline (zoloft). The lexopro just made me exxxxtremely tired & sleepy all day, and didn't help much with the depression, only anxiety.

I'm still on the zoloft (25-50mg a day). It is not without side effects, it gives me bad jaw tension and tends to give me mild sexual dysfunction and laziness. However, environmental sensitivity is less harsh (noises bother me less), and apparently it helps me tolerate food with sugars (i still cannot eat most fruit without getting sick though). My mood is also more stable and I'm generally less irritable and worrisome.

I find it very important to take additional supplemental magnesium (a good chelated form like magnesium orotate or glycinate) with SSRI's. Taking magnesium with them for me has signifigantly reduced the side effects, while simultanously increasing the benefits. Here is a study showing such...

Modulation of antidepressant-like activity of magnesium by serotonergic system.

Another pro of some anti-depressants like some of the SSRI's, is that they supposedly have neuroprotective (protect your brain) properties.

Also, this might blow up the topic, but some anti-depressants apparently have significant anti-microbial (anti-bacterial, anti-fungal) properties, as well as reversing bacterial drug resistance (making the antibiotics work better).


"Psychotropic drugs have been shown to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. Some of these drugs, such as the new antidepressant agents sertraline, fluoxetine and paroxetine are known to act as efflux pump inhibitors in human cells. Their activity has been studied, alone and combined with antibiotics, against bacterial species, mainly in multiply resistant strains. These agents have surprising activity, mainly against Gram positive microorganisms. They also show synergistic activity when combined with some antibiotics against several bacteria, shown by a decrease in MICs, that converts strains previously resistant to the category of sensitive, and modify physiological aspects related with pathogenicity."(1)


1. Antimicrobial activity of psychotropic drugs: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

2. Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

3. Phenylpiperidine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors interfere with multidrug efflux pump activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

4. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

Anyway, good luck on either choice! Do feel free to ask me any questions in private.

--------------------
"You know, the worst, meanest, nastiest, ticks in the world are politicks," - Steve Nostrum

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by Keebler:
And, actually, B12 shots are a great antidepressant for me.

Amazing how when I get a shot I just feel so much better, and that includes mood.

Me too...definitely! [Smile]

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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adamm
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Yeah, don't worry about personality changes... for

me they actually reversed some of those that had occurred

as a result of my TBI's. I cannot emphasize enough the

importance of seeing someone who REALLY knows about

these compounds, though.

[ 13. February 2008, 11:05 AM: Message edited by: adamm ]

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groovy2
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This is the experance I had with 2 friends -

I have known them both for several years-
both were taking Anti depression meds--

At different times Each of them Stopped
taking there meds and about 30 days later
they BOTH FREEKED OUT and went
perty much Crazy -Very Crazy -

They Scared Me --

They stayed Crazy till they started there
meds again and then they both went back
to a more normal state --

Seeing this happen to 2 people I know
has defiantly Scared me away from these
type meds --

It is Very Hard to get threw these illness-
and to do it will a Smile on your face
is Really Tuff to do --

What keep me mostly smiling threw ALL
of this is smoking herb -- pot -- -)

I dont think I would have made it threw
this with out using the Herb -

The resulting buzz is
Pleasant -Energizing - Pain numbing -
can stimulate creativity and thought -
settles stomic -and is relaxing

Herb Defiantly will make you Laff
your Butt Off and things that are
Not really that Funny --

Being able to Smile and Laff threw
this Nightmare has Helped me Alot -

It would be Easy to let these illness
turn you in to a bitter person -
Thats not good for Anyone --

Herb is cheap -Easily available -
no script needed - Instant effect -
Effect only lasts a few hours -
No Hang over --

The only Down side is you will like
chocolate chip cookies -

--Jay--

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amkdiaries
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Hey Groovy-do you know what anti-depressants your friends were on? Would love to know so the same doesn't happen to me!

Thanks!

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groovy2
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Hi AMK

I dont remember what the meds were-

From what I have heard many of the meds
have similar results when stopping -Jay-

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Cobweb
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quote:
Originally posted by amkdiaries:
If I do decide to take an anti-depressant I probably wouldn't tell my doctors but after everything I have been through I think they would understand.

Of course the doctor who prescribed it would know. And if you should decide to take an antidepressent I think it is very important to tell whichever doctor's you are going to.

Anti-depressents are not sugar pills-and could possibly interact with any other meds prescribed. So keep everybody in the loop-for your sake. You want all docs to have an accurate picture of what's going on.

I take a printed out list to give each doctor to put in my folder.

You may find life worth living again!

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adamm
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Yeah, definitely tell your doc. I actually think I may have given

myself some permanent brain damage by going off them

too quickly at one point.

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CD57
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I second what Clarissa so eloquently said....give yourself a break, it's not crack cocaine, it's a band-aid to get you through some tough times! You can quit when you're better.

There are plenty of options out there for everyone. I'm on a half-dose of Lexapro and have found it to work just fine.

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Patti C.
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Don't be afraid of anti-depressants if you need one. I was like you; I didn't want to believe I needed one to cope, but it is just another tool in your arsenal to battle disease.

I began with Prozac a few years ago, and was on that about a year. It worked well, but had side effects such as bizarre, vivid nightmares and sexual dysfunction. I'm a really sensitive person and it made me unable to "feel" anything; I didn't cry anymore, even when it was appropiate.

I then tried Paxil; I felt just tired all the time and not much else. About 18 months ago my doctor suggested I try Cymbalta, most of all because it treats neuropathic pain. I LOVE it.

It isn't a cure-all, but it does help somewhat with the pain, and it takes the edge off depression so that you can focus, function and participate in life when your brain chemistry is sub-par. It also doesn't cause any side effects like the others. When I get well, I plan to discontinue and feed my body high-quality nutrients.

Just my 2 cents; hope it helps.
Patti

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Dancer
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Before I first took them, I too was afraid of them, like I would lose myself or change in some way. Could not have been more wrong. What a life-saver, restored me to my normal self.

In my experience and from what I've read, Lyme can really disrupt brain chemistry. Antidepressants have helped me enormously. Help mood and mental clarity and ability to just get out of bed and function.

Re: problems going off them -- some people may go off them abruptly -- this could cause problems, you're supposed to reduce over a period of time (weeks/months).

I had to try alot of different ones because most seemed to cause insomnia for me. But that's me -- people may react very differently to any given med.

Paxil stopped anxiety/insomnia for me, huge relief, but there were other side effects that I got tired of and I've heard that some people have dramatic problems when going off Paxil, but that didn't happen to me. [correction: CYMBALTA made me sleepy and out of it -- I originally said Celexa by mistake], definitely not helpful for someone with brain fog. But it could affect other people very differently. Zoloft plus Ambien for sleep works great for me.

You may have to experiment til you find something that works for you, but when you do, you might be very relieved.

I've never experienced any stigmatizing attitude by MDs or anyone. That's really unfortunate that others have. You'd think they'd be over it in this day and age. It's a treatment for a physical illness and is nothing to be critical of.

Good luck!

[ 19. February 2008, 05:59 PM: Message edited by: Dancer ]

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map1131
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amk, don't be afraid. You might be one that does extremely well with the right medication for depression & symptoms.

I too fought to stay off certain things early on in this illness from hell. I didn't want to take pain meds and fought it and fought it. Hello? How stupid is that? Does a cancer patient have to tolerate their pain?

I fought sleep meds for the longest time also. No I didn't want to take anything to sleep. Stubborn me has years of bad nights with insomnia, wake-ups all night every hour, early am wake-ups. The reality is if you don't get real restful sleep, the body will never heal. Never!

Then there was depression. Several years ago I tried a few different anti-depressants and I was just so ill that they seemed to never really help me. I guess I thought they were going to do miracles with this lyme & company. So I quit them for about 3 years and suffered by myself.

Finally I ask my Internist to help me with socializing. I used to be social person and I just wanted to stay in my shell. Other people wore me out. People tend to come to me with their problems and seek help. I was wanting to scream "it takes everything I have to take care of myself and my problems, how can I help you?"

Well I'm not that type of person. I have always been a want to help type with others. So my doc recommended xanax to help with anxiety of socializing with family, friends or even just people in the grocery store. I didn't want contact with people. You can't do that with life.

Xanax helped. For a long time, I would only take them prior to being around people, during a stressful situation or sometimes to relax my racing mind in the evening.

Well, there comes another reality and that's that I have some real issues with depression & symptoms. I start to see therapist to talk and it takes her 6 months to get through my thick skull that anyone in my situation would be suffering from some depression.

I told her depression is secondary to lyme & company. It's actually a sx of the bad guys attacking my brain. I've Given her an education in the last 18 mths.

She knew nothing much about lyme & company. The truth is my sx sound alot like many of patients. Wonder why??????

Cymbalta really helped me. I had side effects for three days and then boom...they were gone and I immediately knew I had hit on the right anti for me. I know they are not the long term answer. I've heard and seen the horror stories. Xanax only on a rough period and that's usually has to do with my adult daughter.

But reality is, I've got to have these 3 to 4 meds
or my life would be so much worse. I've got to many roads to cross and still too much work at ending all this lyme & company crap.

I'm thick headed about rx meds sometimes. But I am a survivor.

Pam

--------------------
"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

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dontlikeliver
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Is there anything I can do to help with the insomnia caused by Prozac? It's really bad now compared to pre-Prozac. I am waking so many times at night, it's like all I have is a series of short naps.

I'm also on Rifampin, so between Rifampin adn Prozac, it seems most meds, including sleep meds interact.

Alternatively, what other antidepressant apart from Prozac will NOT cause weight-gain because I do not want to risk putting on an ounce?

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