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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » How to handle the Post Traumatic Stress

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Author Topic: How to handle the Post Traumatic Stress
Monica922
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There is no doubt after the crap I went through the last year and the horrible doctors I saw that I suffer from Post Traumatic stress now. I am far from well which also does not help the situation. Yet when I think of the three hospitals, spinal taps, EMGs, EEG,s blood tests, etc etc etc and horror I put my kids through...I just cry.

I was told so many times that it was anxiety, possibly MS, lupus, connective tissue disorder, syphillis, etc etc...the morons knew I was bit by a tick and watched me deteriorate to Hell.

Nobody listened to me and I could not fight for myself in that weak state. Facial paralysis, leg/arm paralysis, neuropathy, tremors, heart palps, muscle twitches, ear/eye/jaw pain...how the heck could they have allowed me to get so bad when I was classic LYME and BABS. I have so much anger towards their ignorance...especially when I know how many people suffered before me and continue to suffer because of inept physicians.

I find myself just crying from the last year now...and I hate that too. I was always the strong one and now I feel like I have lost myself somewhere. I cannot take antidepressants because they make me sick...but I do take ativan and it helps. I live in quite horrible pain with the neuropathy now. Do you do anything else that helps mentally while you fight the good fight to get better?

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bejoy
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Cry away honey, cry away.

I avoided the invasive procedures because I "looked to good to possibly be sick", and just suffered at home trying to figure out what was wrong with me.

But still, all that pain and powerlessness I went through leaves me at times wanting to wail and cry and scream.

Find a good therapist, if you don't have one yet, who is capable of just listening and being with your pain.

You don't need another practitioner who wants to figure our, diagnose, and fix, just somebody who can help you be where you are and get your power back.

As you get your health back, the horror will fade away into a bad dream, and then just an experience you survived out of your past.

Craniosacral therapy can help a whole bunch too, with both the physical and mental pain.

Hang in there. You're on your way back out now.

--------------------
bejoy!

"Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

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feelfit
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Don't know if you are into God/Spirituality or not, but I have been listening to a cd called : Prayer for whole body healing By Christopher Ian Chennowith.

It is an hour long and I lay on my bed and listen w/headphones. I find great relief with it.

www.positivechristianity.org

hope this helps,

Feelfit [Smile]

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Monica922
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Thanks both of you [Smile]
Monica

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daise
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Hi Monica,

You had Bell's palsy--so did I. It's miserable. My VA neurologist ducks called it a stroke. That's goofy.

It's frightening the extent of abuse we get from ducks. I would think, "How can they get away with this neglect and abuse?" [Eek!]

I have anger blowing out my ears, from it. [bonk] However, my PTSD arrived decades before Lyme.

Here's a link to a Lymenet post from last month, concerning PTSD:
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=019333


Everyone: a psychologist who practices EMDR Level 2 can do wonderful things for PTSD and in a short time. I know!

daise [Smile]

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amkdiaries
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I can totally relate to the Post traumatic stress disorder. I often wake up in the middle of the night after falling asleep which sometimes can take three hours or more and have horrific images of hospitals, IV bags and blood draws.

I sometimes find myself waking up saying doctor's names and having conversations with them. I contacted a therapist skilled in post traumatic stress disorder because unless it gets addressed you can't heal. The therapist told me that the fear and trauma is in your cells and affects your immune system. I believe it and think it is very important to do something about it.

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bettyg
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monica, [group hug] [kiss] just extending a shoulder to cry on.

i was going to post the other PSTD recently posted, but Daise brought it up for you. Best wishes. Sound off as needed... [kiss]

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tailz
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I read somewhere that in order to heal psychologically you need to face your perpetrator(s). Unfortunately, sitting in front of a therapist telling her how angry I am at doctors X, Y, and Z does little to erase the hell I went through that only continues to mount as time goes by.

Give me one hour in a room (preferably with a billy club) with any of my doctors and I guarantee I can reclaim my wounded inner child free of charge - and quickly!

Someone on another forum recommended the book "How Doctors Think", but my BP goes up just reading the title - because they DON'T THINK - they STEREOTYPE.

I had elevated eosinophils and worked for a vet, yet they never considered a zoonotic disease?

Stereotypes - that's how they think. And that's why most chronic Lymies are female and either middle-aged or darn close to it.

"Mismeasure of Women" - that's the book I'd recommend.

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METALLlC BLUE
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quote:

There is no doubt after the crap I went through the last year and the horrible doctors I saw that I suffer from Post Traumatic stress now. I am far from well which also does not help the situation. Yet when I think of the three hospitals, spinal taps, EMGs, EEG,s blood tests, etc etc etc and horror I put my kids through...I just cry.

I understand exactly where you're coming from based on what you've said. It is terrifying, it's a living nightmare. Like me, you probably sleep sometimes -- if lucky -- and upon waking realize that the nightmare isn't in your dreams, but rather when you're conscious.

quote:

I was told so many times that it was anxiety, possibly MS, lupus, connective tissue disorder, syphillis, etc etc...the morons knew I was bit by a tick and watched me deteriorate to Hell.

I know how awful it's been for you. The insanity of doing all the right things, and being told "You're the problem." You begin to think you're insane, and the irony is -- you are losing it. Your mind is being attacked by Lyme or other infections, and here you are surrounded by people you thought knew a lot more than they do -- telling you "I don't know, or it's this, or this, or maybe you should see a psychiatrist to solve this problem."

I would be so angry, and I once was. Today I've moved beyond the majority of my grief and anger at doctors. I thought I would never get over it. I actually sat down with my physician -- after 10 years of primary care and having been misdiagnosed the whole way -- and told him "It is unfortunate what happened between us. You did the best you could given what you knew, and I was doing the best I could. Fate made us enemies, and I had no choice but to be filled with rage, and for you to sit there thinking I was a lunatic. The reality is, I did lose touch with reality and it really was in my head, but it wasn't just in my head -- it was an infection. So you were right, but you were also wrong. Perhaps now, if we're both fortunate, when you treat another patient who presents with a similar pattern, you'll reserve judgment."

In his own way he apologized to me, I could tell -- he was nearly in tears but he wouldn't say so. He shook my hand, and I told him that it was misery working with him, but that I'm glad we could part ways with this new knowledge aquired along the journey.

People are responsible when they fall short, but everyone falls short, and we'll continue to. Until we know it all, we'll be at risk for these errors, and even the best physicians will make this error at various points. Sure some are worse then others -- sure there are some who really truly don't care -- but we're entitled to our anger and rage, and of course one day you'll be entitled to let it all go, and you'll be relieved it's over.

quote:

Nobody listened to me and I could not fight for myself in that weak state. Facial paralysis, leg/arm paralysis, neuropathy, tremors, heart palps, muscle twitches, ear/eye/jaw pain...how the heck could they have allowed me to get so bad when I was classic LYME and BABS. I have so much anger towards their ignorance...especially when I know how many people suffered before me and continue to suffer because of inept physicians.

The ignorance is so pervasive, and we must fight this war with all we have. I say, let us focus whatever energy we have into our recoveries, and into solving the research riddle with Lyme. Let us focus on the result, not the means. Let's get ourselves well, and take down the IDSA and everyone along with them who dismisses and minimizes tick-borne illness.

I say, feel your pain, then.....when you're ready -- let's kick some *** .

quote:

I find myself just crying from the last year now...and I hate that too. I was always the strong one and now I feel like I have lost myself somewhere. I cannot take antidepressants because they make me sick...but I do take ativan and it helps. I live in quite horrible pain with the neuropathy now. Do you do anything else that helps mentally while you fight the good fight to get better?

I empathize, I felt so ashamed to cry as much as I did when I did, but looking back -- I was surviving. I was doing whatever it took to maintain balance inside a mind that was entirely imbalanced.

You still are the strong one, the only difference is now the pressure has been applied. Even iron can break when enough pressure is applied, you understand what I'm saying? You havent' broken yet, you're still alive. You are strong, you're just distressed, bowing and bent, but you'll very likely bend back now that you are on this track. Therapy is so important, along with -- if you are inclined -- to have spiritual support. I allowed a pastor from a local church to visit me while hospitalized. I was so fortunate that particular day to meet someone who just didnt' say much of anything. He just listened and then asked me if I'd like him to say a prayer. I trust him now, and I've consulted him for other issues along the way. He's even come to my home when I was too debilitated to go to him. It's important to build a support system involving family, friends, and health care professionals or anyone else who will stand beside you. You know who is and isn't truely on your side. Dump those that you know deep down don't believe you, and don't care. Embrace and truly let yourself trust those who stayed the course.

Counseling can be done by phone for those debilitated by crippling illness. Find a specialist within your local area who specifically treats chronic illness. By default those who specialize in chronic illness support also have the experience to manage patients working with Post Trauma.

I also have PTSD, but 95% of it is gone, and the remaining 5% is related to the ongoing war within my body and mind, as well as the fight to maintain relationships, finances, and my own sanity. The past can haunt us, but the past is gone and something might be found to take it's place.

--------------------
I am not a physician, so do your own research to confirm any ideas given and then speak with a health care provider you trust.

E-mail: [email protected]

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disturbedme
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My LLMD told me that Ezov from the Cowden Protocol was good -- you can find it at nutramedix.com. It promotes emotional balance.

He says that when he recommends it to his patients they sometimes get offended, but he says it supposedly is good. But it does seem to make a person's dreams more vivid. Not sure if that means nightmare-ish or bad, but just more vivid/real, I think.

But he said that he believes anyone who's had to go through what any of us has had to go through with this disease and all the damage it can do to us physically as well as mentally and spiritually, etc., etc., should at least try it.

--------------------
One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.
~ Helen Keller

My Lyme Story

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roro
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I can totally relate to the PTSD, but I too had it way before lyme. I have had mny traumatic events in my life, I wont go into details, but think violence, guns, death.

I think what I am going through now is more than just PTSD. A lot of it is anger at doctors.

I learned so many things about the way medicine works that have totally changed my view of doctors and medicine. I now realize how little we really know and how dangerous that is.

I have absolutely no trust in most doctors. there is no science or logic behind medicine. It is all about labels and standard treatments, "cookbook" if you will.

If someone is ill with something that hasn't been discovered yet or for some other reason doesn't fit into one of their nice little labels, they are neglected.

No matter how sick they get from it, even if they get sepsis, heart failure, kidney failure, paralysis, etc, they will not be treated. they will not even be cared for, they will just be sent home to suffer and die.

if they are lucky they will at least get medicines to treat the symptoms, and if they go to the ER they will patch them up and get them stable or they will eventually get put in a nursing home where they will be left in a bed to rot.

my 18 year old son has lyme, and I am scared to death for his future. I am trying desperately to get better and keep a positive attitude for his sake.

this is a problem not just in medicine but in many fields. Law, business, politics, even engineering. (there is a book about it in law, called "the death of common sense")

basically people are like robots, and not able to think or solve problems anymore. they simmply follow procedures. most "work" done requires little problem solving. the only creativity is people coming up with meaningless crap.

anyway I digress.

the next time a doctor tells me to go to a psychiatrist, I am going to say "yes, you are right. I have PTSD from all the abuse and neglect I have encountered at the hands of the incompetant doctors who have treated me"

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lymeladyinNY
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I have PTSD. When I was in the hospital last fall with meningitis and then with blood clots I was abused by the doctors on my case.

My left arm was purple from needle pricks and today the arm is scarred and any routine blood work is a nightmare.

I always cry when they keep stabbing me trying to get blood and usually not succeeding. I always find myself apologizing for crying, too! [Mad]

I go through terrible anxiety and depression since last fall that I never felt before the hospitalization. It's been awful.

I just tried to go on cymbalta but it made me feel worse with headache, tremors, nausea.

I don't post here as much as I used to because of this problem with trauma.

- Lymelady

--------------------
I want to be free

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listenswithcare
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I second the recommendation for a good LCSW with EMDR training. Also Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) helps with the negative thoughts we have about ourselves because of the disease and how we have been treated.

I don't think I could have survived all these years without that kind of support in my life.

Robin

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Dawn in VA
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Perhaps this sounds a bit cheesy and cliche these days, but I do deep breathing (abdomen breathing) and sometimes visualization or mild meditation. The sympathetic "relaxation response" is reckoned to be initiated after 10 min. of the above.

It doesn't work all of the time, and frankly sometimes a good (or two or three...) crying session is a lot more appealing in addition or instead. Sometimes the concentration on meditation or visualization is a tough thing.

Candance Pert, author of Molecules of Emotion (love that book), has a visualization/relaxation CD out. It's kind of hard to find- maybe on Ebay, definitely through a company called sounds true. I can't remember their website, sorry. A search outta bring it up.

Another one I like is guided by Reid Wilson, a guy who used to work at UNC. I remember getting it from the Midwest Center's website. (Again, can't recall the website.) It's a lot shorter than Pert's and has helped me a lot. I've used it on flights, too.

--------------------
(The ole disclaimer: I'm not a doctor.)

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achey
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A good homeopath may be able to help you with a homeopathic remedy to help balance your body on mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual levels.

Also consider Integrative Manual Therapy, which helps the body to learn to heal on all of the above levels.

I will keep you in my prayers!

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daise
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Hi everyone,

No one knows why the EMDR (level 2) method works. It just does. It can heal PTSD or partly heal it.

EMDR is specifically for PTSD. They "think" that a PTSD traumatic event puts a "monkey wrench" in your brain and actually slows it down.

Repeated visuals of the traumatic event bring you back literally, to the "monkey wrench," like the old time broken record (remember the days of records?) that would repeat, repeat, repeat, just like our PTSD visuals repeat, repeat, repeat.

The EMDR method--somehow--helps you get past the broken record and then your brain speeds-up past the traumatic event. That is the healing. Real healing. You can then much, much more easily deal with "residue issues" as a result of it.

The way it is proved is when it helps you or cures you.

Bring hankies!

Seems it's popular with insurance companies. It took 5 sessions, for me. That's all.

I'm very grateful for EMDR. It was a relief and a turning point.

I also had two sessions with the same psychologist (not EMDR) that were affirmations when I was trying to get Lyme treatment and hoping that would help me. Thank goodness for that, too. It was another turning point.

It was paid for by state Medicaid, through my Medicaid insurance company.

With Medicaid (after you get it,)I say choose your Medicaid insurance company wisely in order to get Lyme treatment paid for--and EMDR if you need it. Non-profit health insurance companies often are best.

For who does EMDR, contact your insurance company, or look in the yellow pages and then contact your insurance company to see if a particular psychologist is covered for doing EMDR Level 2.

The best to you all.

Daise [Smile]

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JayG
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Monica and all of the other posters in this thread.

Thank you so very much for your bare-bones honesty and the ability to share it here.

I need to follow up on a lot of the suggestions here.

I have had EMDR (level 2) and am a huge believer in this therapy.

I have to follow up cuz like Daise said, even though no one knows how this works, it just does.

I will never recover with all of this pent up anger and resentment stifling me. None of us will.

This method did work for me but I quit on it...I hit a wall. Got paralyzed by fear of becoming me again.

I was very comfortable with the angry, nasty, and solitary person I had become, I thought.

Time to go back to "those days" before I got broken by these people who I had put on a pedestal...they were doctors after all.

My thoughts and prayers go out to all of you that have been there, done that.

Please remember me in yours.

I do find it difficult to even ask for that small bit of help.

This is truely the best thread I have ever read here,but it saddens me to realize we are all here for the same misbehaviors in the medical profession.

I was pigeonholed as a drug-seeker.

They didn't believe me until the surgeon held my heart in his hands and sewed me a few new heart-parts (mitral valve repair).

The prolapsed valve is a classic lyme symptom.

I had led a very physical and sports-oriented life prior, and had never even had a murmur.

Tons of complaints and ER visits and cardiologists later, surgery.

One of the circus refugees actually accused me of wanting to be a "cardiac-cripple". I wanted to "cripple" him right then and there.

Oh was I angry.

Enough said, there are too many "I's" in this post and that is uncomforable for me.

Tough to write these days after so many years of unchecked TBI's.

Godspeed to all on the journey back to health ond wholeness.

Thank you all again for your honesty and for sharing your feelings here.

Until that day

JayG

--------------------
JayG

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Tracy9
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Yay to those who mentioned EMDR, as I was scrolling down to say the same thing!!!

www.emdr.com

EMDR is the most effective treatment for PTSD. I am a level 2 trained EMDR therapist and have personally watched it work wonders with lots of people. It really is the best way to go, along with doing all the wonderful things that will help you along this journey.

--------------------
NO PM; CONTACT: [email protected]

13 years Lyme & Co.; Small Fiber Neuropathy; Myasthenia Gravis, Adrenal Insufficiency. On chemo for 2 1/2 years as experimental treatment for MG.

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daise
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Everyone,

Some of my favorite people are on this thread. Hi you guys! bejoy, amkdiaries, metallic blue, disturbedme, roro, lymeladyinNY, listenswithcare, Dawn in VA, achey and more to follow ...


Hi Tracy,

I knew there was something special about you--you help people with their PTSD, through EMDR. You're someone who is helping people in this world and making a difference. And with your Lyme stuff lurking. Thank you!


Hi Monica,

You're the brave one who started this thread of truth galloping along the air waves. Ya--this crap makes you cry. Ya. Gotta cry.

The Lyme/TBI's experience is just so rediculous in every way that sometimes all you can do, for the moment, is cry. It's when crying seems to be what's called for.

It's normal to cry for you, your family and the human race when faced with what is utterly stupid and mean, and sometimes evil, and we Lymies have one of the ringside seats of that. I think compassion is normal and when it's not, something is damned wrong.

Bawl your eyes out. Indulge yourself. You deserve it. Ya.

Sometimes I cozy-in to a nice Lyme nap. I play jungle sounds or shore birds chattering or a thunderstorm. I especially like whale song.

And then I go on in life sometimes crying within ... to the supermarket, Wal-Mart, or wherever.

Or walking into a duck appointment and knowing I have to rally myself to FIGHT, FIGHT, FIGHT, but in a calm and rational way, using strategy to try to get what I need ... and usually all the duck does is quack, quack, quack.

Often I have the audacity to think I can teach a duck with intimidating diplomas on their wall, something new. It feels good to try to teach common sense. Sometimes I lose it and the anger dishes forth. And whether the duck realizes it or not, I have left my mark.

I just found my apple pin. It's squarish, gold around the outside, a white background behind a fat red apple with a green leaf, too. It's been lost for awhile. I use to have the arrogance to think I'd earned it. I'd fished it out of some sale back in the eighties.

Why was it arrogance to think I had things to teach?

I used to wear it, for example at work, when I knew I had to teach a racist fellow employee in front of the boss, or a sexist a__ in front of a sexist a__ boss. I left my mark, gentle or rash, wearing my apple pin.

That funny little pin helped to give me courage. Or was it that it helped keep me on the straight and narrow so I'd rememebr why I was there and not get scared? My good-luck teaching pin! Now I can wear it again. My companion, of sorts.

I think that our Lyme experience and speaking out--for example, being "bashed in the head" by most doctors--is making a difference to effect change in how the human race proceeds, and in multiple ways. We just don't see it emblazoned on billboards right now.

We Lymies are some of the humans who have taken it's vital readings and the human race can do a whole, whole, whole lot better!

Afterall, we have the unique insight of our Lyme experience. Much of it ain't pretty, because much of how society does things ain't pretty, in the US and abroad.

Yes, EMDR Level 2 helps a lot, plus supportive spirituality of one kind or another. After that, maybe it's in the residue that there are diamonds to be found.

As we each are feeling better from Lyme/TBI's and PTSD, we can affect change. That's how I spend some of my residual stuff. Sometimes I even do it with anger blowing out my ears. Damn right.

When I express what I've learned from the Lyme experience (not necessarily mentioning Lyme) to someone I come across in my life ... it's a release of anger, too, when it's constructive.

Like, "You're hurting bad. Do you have someone to advocate for you at the ducks office?" I've slipped, not realizing that someone not in Lymeland doesn't know what I'm talking about.

"I mean at your doctor's appointment? Most doctors in America could care less about us. Are you aware of that? You have to be bold with them."

"Do you know that at the VA those 'patient advocates' actually do the bidding of the VA legal department? It's important to know that."

And, "Here's the name of someone at that office who will actually try to help you."

And so on ...


Hi Jay,

You wrote of your anguish with doctors, revealing so much lost in your life, so much fright and pain in your life. Isn't it all so awful?

________________

Jay wrote:
"I will never recover with all of this pent up anger and resentment stifling me. None of us will."

________________

Jay, just keep at it.

Sounds like you're on a healthy path, from my own experience.

I'm putting some of that "pent-up anger and resentment" to work. I'm feeling better from Lyme. My brain works better. Something CAN be done about it. I'm talking about our Lyme/TBI experience.

I keep trying to find the silver lining in all the bull we've gone through, to make things for those who come behind, better.

I've found release and hope in that. And gratitude. I'm alive, by God! That's what's kept me going.

I get the idea all of you know that, too, or you wouldn't have posted in this thread, huh?


Hey Tailz,

Mismeasure Of Women. I'll see if that's at the library.

How are you? You've been quiet for awhile. Hope you're OK.

Duck hunting vests are on sale at Target. Got mine.


Feelfit and BettyG,

Are you defrosting up there? I'm from Up North myself, originally and I know how wonderful it is when you've gone through a northern winter ... then slide into warm springtime with flower bulbs growing and trees bursting with new green. It's a treat. Happy spring!


<><><><><>

You know what? When I had my EUREKA! moment of figuring out I had Lyme, that in itself was healing. I'd been flapping on the beach like a fish out of water. Now I had water.

I knew I wasn't the only one with whatever it was I had, but knowing the name of it acknowledged that in a big way, for me. I am really, really, really not the only one!

It was joy. Knowing what I had gave me a chance!

I was evicted from my apartment with a cathetar in my left arm, during a blizzard. (Albuquerque had a rare, Minnesota-style blizzard. Honest.) I didn't know what I was going to do.

I couldn't leave the state to live with friends or I'd lose all my medical arrangements. I house sat for a friend with 6 puppies for about 2 1/2 weeks. And shoveled. Except there were no snow shovels for sale. Few snow plows in town. This town was a mess for a couple weeks.

Then I found out about the veterans place where I live. I am termed "homeless veteran," though I have a roof over my head--my own room! I'm grateful for that. My nurses were allowed to come in here.

A great portion of the veterans here have serious PTSD that has gone untreated for decades. Vietnam Vets, especially. The VA ignores vets with PTSD. For the most part, the patient feels blamed.

You might say that living here is a study in what is battle PTSD.

A high number here are bipolar or paranoid schizophrenic--or both. Heroin, crack and meth are commonplace here, along with active alcoholism (yes, active users right inside the center.) Fist fights, etc. Right now there are 4 women living here.

It can be frustrating, but I try to maintain gratitude that I have a roof over my head and I am still on my path--gonna lick this, whatever it takes.

And ducks? I had hypothyroidism for decades that went undiagnosed.

But I don't want to get rid of my anger. After all, it's mine! Like money in a bank. It's propelling me for activism. Oh no--don't take away all of my anger! I will spend it as I please. At the least, that's how I see it.

I am a "homeless veteran" who fixes her hair, wears clean clothes, takes supplements, has a donated computer and who works out at the "spa" (at Defined Fitness with weightlifting machines, warm pool & a good and steamy steam room ... large showers!) who also is an activist.

'Cuz I'm feelin' better.

I've learned that a person can do anything when they have goals and determination. And enough anger for fuel.

I try to expose the ducks for what they are: salespeople who use their medical degree as a get rich quick scheme.

There is that oddball doctor who is a genuine human being. They are so few--aren't they a treasure? I tell them that. I think sometimes I embarass them in telling them how much I appreciate them.

Before I got Lyme, I worked on my PTSD, over the decades. Preparing to go on vision quests, going and then returning to reflect on my experience helped me gather lose thoughts and make sense of them.

I'd go to Jamie Sams' Sacred Path book, for what was thought-provoking and I'd dig in me, for what that meant. Like re-arranging flower bulbs. I used her book very much as guidance to delve within and I also found reassurance.

She has strong word-pictures of psychological and spiritual markers and I went miles with her good help. Her Medicine Cards book, too.

As I worked hard to put more lose thoughts into folders my brain became more organized. Like cleaning house.

Still ... EMDR Level 2 was the topper.

Here I go ramb-bo-ling on.

I think we Lyme patients have seen something special from where we roost. It ain't pretty when so many put profits over patients. But there are silver linings to salvage.

Time for dinner--yum!

daise [Smile]

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Tracy9
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Daise,
Thank you for your sweet words.

I wish my lyme stuff was lurking! I'll take lurking! Lurking sounds good!

Mine is in full on attack!!! [Embarrassed]

--------------------
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13 years Lyme & Co.; Small Fiber Neuropathy; Myasthenia Gravis, Adrenal Insufficiency. On chemo for 2 1/2 years as experimental treatment for MG.

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daise
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Tracy,

Is it hailing back or is it a herx or is disease damage dinging bells, or what? [Frown]

Do you have a plan?

I wish you were only lurking with Lyme. [Razz]

daise [Smile]

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Tracy9
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Well Daise, I have never gone into remission yet; I have been in full on active treatment for 3 1/2 years. There was one four or five month point in late 2006 where I was only getting one bad day a week, but that is the best I have ever been.

I have changed docs a few times. I'm with my current LLMD for only six months, so it feels like starting over again. I started one treatment and herxed for six weeks, now I am on another....but i have been consistently very, very sick.

However I am worse now then I was before; but it has been this way since about Jan of 2007. Definitely very bad since Dec 2007; basically bedridden, since change of treatment.

It is one long blurred road.....all I know is I am the worst I've ever been and I don't quite know why. I still feel I am on the right path though, with this new LLMD! [Wink]

--------------------
NO PM; CONTACT: [email protected]

13 years Lyme & Co.; Small Fiber Neuropathy; Myasthenia Gravis, Adrenal Insufficiency. On chemo for 2 1/2 years as experimental treatment for MG.

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daise
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Tracy, you're basically bedridden? I had no idea.

Gosh, I'm a year and seven months into heavy treatment and probably will be in heavy treatment for about 2 1/2 years. That's how I see the future.

But I'm also lucky because I've improved a lot.

Do you live alone?

daise [Smile]

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Monica922
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Hi Tracy
I hope you start to see a change very soon...like NOW! I am hoepful and I do think they will find a cure for this someday soon.

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Mo
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EFT goes even further, eliminating the time and need to go over past traumatic events. you acknowledge and release yourself from them.

www.emofree.com

i don't have allot of personal experience with it yet, but i find it worth the time to explore.
i know dr. k. in seattle finds it integral to healing for some patients.

there has been some amazing work done with this and PTSD, among other things. healing the emotions has some immediate physical effects.
the concept is definately "out there" - but i think progressively so.

mo

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daise
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Monica922
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I am going to start EMT next Wed...I hope it helps. Trust me it can only help... [Smile]
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