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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Nitric oxide...friend or foe?

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Author Topic: Nitric oxide...friend or foe?
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
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It looks like far infrared (880nm) impacts cytochrome C oxidase which binds to NO...nitric oxide.

Is NO needed to kill Bb...some say NOT:

"Despite being deficient in a key antimicrobial agent, iNOS-deficient mice had tissue levels of B. burgdorferi similar to those in control mice.

Thus, NO does not have a critical role in susceptibility to Lyme arthritis through tissue damage via an overexuberant inflammatory response, nor is it required in resistance through the clearance of spirochetes from tissues."

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/314774

Now what if we increase Cytochrome C oxidase and lowered/inhibited NO levels?

"Nitric oxide inhibition

increased maternal hematocrit levels

while decreasing maternal erythropoietin levels without significantly altering the maternal acid-base status.

In contrast with chronic hypoxia, nitric oxide inhibition increased fetal NRBCs (Nucleated red blood cells) without affecting erythropoietin levels.

CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the number of NRBCs in fetal circulation does not serve as a specific marker of chronic hypoxia that accompanies IUGR or of elevated erythropoietin levels but are an epiphenomenon that is related to the

inhibition of nitric oxide.

Bb's lipoproteins trigger NO...to its advantage perhaps.

Keep this in mind:

"The results are consistent with our hypothesis that the mechanism of photobiomodulation involves the

up-regulation of cytochrome c oxidase,

leading to increased energy metabolism
in neurons functionally inactivated by toxins."

A little more complex:

"Pharmacological manipulation of cytochrome c oxidase indicates that this enzyme, when it is in turnover and in its oxidized state,

inactivates physiological amounts of NO,

thus regulating its intra- and extracellular concentrations.

This inactivation is prevented by blocking the enzyme with inhibitors, including NO.

Furthermore, when cells generating low concentrations of NO respire toward hypoxia, the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase changes from oxidized to reduced, leading to a decrease in NO inactivation.

The resultant increase in NO concentration could explain hypoxic vasodilation."

Yea NASA (easier to understand):

http://www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/technologies/led_treatment.html

Due to the proximity of the "belly button" to the aorta...placing the far infrared light there maybe very beneficial...it was suggested in one website.

???

Far infrared device:

http://www.healiohealth.com/tek9.asp?pg=products&specific=jnjonscpo

[ 07. June 2008, 07:37 AM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
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Up...relabeled this to get your attention.

And repeating from another post:

"Factors that trigger osteoarthritis induce the synthesis of nitric oxide by the chondrocytes in articular cartilage.

Nitric oxide levels go up in the joint space, which can sharply increase the biological effects at different levels.

Nitric oxide can act on articular cartilage by

inhibiting the synthesis of collagen

and proteoglycans,

while stimulating the synthesis of metalloproteinases and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) of the chondrocytes .

Nitric oxide can act on the synovial tissue by

stimulating the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors into the joint space,

as well as other factors that can

destroy cartilage,

such as the metalloproteinases.

As a result of cartilage destruction, cartilage fragments are released that are also able to induce the release of pro-inflammatory factors into the synovial tissue.

Both IL-1 b AND TNF- a need a mechanism of secondary messengers to perform their functions.

IL-1 b stimulates both the nitric-oxide pathway and the cyclooxygenase 2 pathway, which causes an increase in prostaglandin E2 levels.

Both pathways result in the direct or indirect destruction of the cartilage."

My inquisitive mind is asking:

Does so much COX-2 lower the protective COX-1 levels (they both react with AA)?

[ 07. June 2008, 12:57 PM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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riverpatrol
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Intersting. My LLMD has be on a NO/ONOO protocol to reduce NO. He says it is causing an 'inflammation cycle' that causes my arthritis to linger.
Posts: 69 | From So Cal | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
troutscout
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I take a supplement that increases my NO levels...I have felt better since doing it.

Healthier...more energetic, my circulation seems better also.

--------------------
Now is the time in your life to find the "tiger" within.
Let the claws be bared,
and Lyme BEWARE!!!
www.iowalymedisease.com
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Posts: 5262 | From North East Iowa | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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