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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » is queen bee jelly good for you?

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Author Topic: is queen bee jelly good for you?
randibear
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i've been doing more research.

i read about some caps called beeplus. they have royal queen bee jelly, propulis, honey, and something else. sorry, can't remember.

it's supposed to be great for the immune system.

is it worth it? do you think it might help lyme?

also, i'm allergic to wasps, bees, etc., can i still try this???

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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I don't know, Randi. I tried the number 1 bee pollen stuff and just couldn't take the taste. Is what you're talking about capsules, or what?

And I'm not sure about it being safe if you're allergic to wasps, bees... just don't know!

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95730 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tincup
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I don't know either... but would like to hear from others that do as I also was checking into it.

Hey tutu...

Looks like we've got a post going that admits who doesn't know about it rather than who does.

HA!

Sorry Randibear...

[Big Grin]

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Posts: 20353 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katieb
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I take royal jelly from a company called bee alive. It is fresh royal jelly, not freeze dried. Royal jelly has B vitamins, which is suppose to be good for you. It also give me the energy I need.
Posts: 71 | From milford, connecticut | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
proudmom
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Hi there,

You peeked my curiosity and I found 3 different types of bee product from this web site:
[URL=http://www.vitaminstuff.com/supplements-bee-propolis.html/URL]


Bee Propolis Supplements

Bee propolis is a natural material that bees make from tree sap and wax to help seal off their hives. It has a long history of medicinal use, and modern research has found that it does indeed inhibit the growth of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms, and may even help prevent cancer.

Bee propolis contains many antioxidant chemicals, including terpenes and bioflavonoids, as well as cinnamic, phenolic, and caffeic acids. However, propolis is best known for its natural antibiotic effects; in fact, doctors once soaked bandages in honey (which contains propolis) before dressing wounds to help prevent infection.

Clinical studies have shown that propolis inhibits the growth of the bacteria that cause pneumonia and strep and staph infections, which is particularly beneficial today when the potentially deadly staphylococcus bacteria has become resistant to almost all pharmaceutical antibiotics.

Multiple studies have demonstrated that the compounds in propolis actually enhance the performance of prescription antibiotics normally used to treat serious infections.

The caffeic acid in propolis may help prevent colon cancer, according to an article published in the September 1993 issue of Cancer Research, which reported that laboratory rats who took caffeic acid did not develop precancerous tissue, even after they were exposed to cancer-causing chemicals.

Propolis also contains a lot of bioflavonoids, which have been proven to have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, unlike any prescription pharmaceutical available today, natural bee propolis may inhibit the growth of viruses that cause the flu and common cold, as well as the herpes simplex virus.

Propolis occurs naturally in honey, and is sometimes added to lip gloss and other cosmetics. It is available in tablets, capsules, powders, extracts, creams, lotions, and ointments at your local health food store and from numerous online distributorships.

Follow the dosage and usage instructions on the package, and discontinue use if any rash or other allergic reaction should develop. Keep in mind that research concerning this product is far from conclusive--some health professionals do not think bee propolis offers humans any health benefits at all, and warn that propolis could cause severe allergic reactions in environmentally sensitive individuals, as well as those who have known allergies to bees and bee products.


Royal Jelly Supplements

Royal jelly is a creamy white substance secreted from the salivary glands of worker bees to feed young bee larvae. The larvae that will eventually develop into queen bees continue to receive this nectar until they reach maturation.


It has been theorized that it is this diet of royal jelly that allows the queen bee to grow bigger and live longer than the other bees, and for this reason some believe that royal jelly is can have life-extending effects for humans as well.

Advocates of royal jelly supplementation claim that this substance increases energy and vitality. Royal jelly is also thought to have antioxidant effects that slow signs of aging and reduce symptoms of many age-related disorders, including arthritis, multiple sclerosis, baldness, decreased libido, menopause, osteoporosis, heart disease, high cholesterol, and decreased muscle and skin tone.

Royal jelly has also been recommended for treatment of asthma, depressed immune system, insomnia, fatigue, ulcers, and a host of digestive and skin disorders. It is available at health-food stores and from mail order and online distributors.

Royal jelly comes in soft-gel capsules and extracts, and is added as a moisturizing agent to many cosmetic creams, shampoos, and conditioners.

Unfortunately, there is currently no scientific evidence to back up claims that royal jelly is an effective treatment for any human disease or disorder. In addition, some doctors warn that royal jelly could cause potentially dangerous or even fatal allergic reactions. It is interesting to note that royal jelly is actually sometimes recommended for treatment of allergies, the theory being that, like allergy shots, royal jelly delivers small amounts of pollen that over time increase tolerance to certain plants.


However,there have been reports of people developing hives, asthma, and even going into anaphylactic shock after ingesting royal jelly. Anyone allergic to ragweed, dandelions, sunflowers, chrysanthemums, bees, or honey should not consume royal jelly.


Bee Pollen Supplements


The term bee pollen refers to the plant pollen that collects on bees as they gather nectar. It is gathered with a special device designed to brush the material from their hind legs as they enter the hive.

Bee pollen has been called nature's perfect food and is said to contain vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids found in every plant from which bees collect pollen. It is used to increase energy, boost the immune system, and fight the effects of aging.

Bee pollen may help build the immune system. It contains protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, and lecithin, beta-carotene and selenium; all nutrients that have been shown to have powerful antioxidant effects in the body.

Thus, it has been theorized that bee pollen could help treat conditions associated with free-radical damage, such as cancer, heart disease, and decreased mental function. Bee pollen has also been touted as an anti-aging supplement, and its proponents claim that it can prevent the weight gain, decreased libido, lethargy, and decline in muscle and skin tone associated with aging.

Bee pollen has also been used to treat allergies, the idea being that small amounts of bee pollen will, like allergy shots, gradually build immunity to all the plant pollens collected from the bees. However, some health professionals warn that using bee pollen to treat allergies could cause dangerous allergic reactions in some people, because it is impossible to determine the exact amount or type of pollen present in each supplement.


Bee pollen has been recommended for treatment of just about everything, including nausea, insomnia, all types of infection, suppressed immune system following chemotherapy, low libido, low blood pressure, anemia, heart disease, cancer, and constipation, to name a few. It is also sometimes used to improve athletic performance and mental function.

Many in the scientific community are skeptical about the health claims made by bee pollen advocates. They point out that plant enzymes get digested in the human body and so they do not have any effect on human metabolic function. They also point to the lack of scientific evidence to support the use of bee pollen for treatment of any human health condition.

Bee pollen products are available at health-food stores, drugstores, mail-order suppliers, and at online distributors. It comes in capsules, tablets, and granules. People with allergies to plants should take this supplement with caution; bee pollen could cause allergic reactions.

I hope this helps a little. I too am allergic to bees etc. so I guess I will avoid these. I haven't had any problems with honey though and it does contain sm amounts of the what's listed above.

Still confused? Me too!!! [dizzy]

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"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"--Carl Sagan

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by Tincup:
I don't know either... but would like to hear from others that do as I also was checking into it.

Hey tutu...

Looks like we've got a post going that admits who doesn't know about it rather than who does.

[woohoo] Hey! We're GOOD!! [spinning smile]

Yeah, it was the Bee Alive I took. Didn't like the idea of ingesting honey with my yeast tendencies and on top of that the taste was less than stellar. Noticed no difference in energy.

I would think it's far better than anything freeze-dried though.

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95730 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
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well i had a very bad reaction to an asp bite. not the snake, it's a variety of wasp.

i had red streaks going up my neck and the area was swollen and red.

dang, don'tthink i'll try this.....

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Tom64
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All of you worried about the allergy thing are probably OK to eat honey and take royal jelly. You're probably allergic to the venom in the sting of the wasp/bee, but there should be none of that in either honey or royal jelly or pollen. If you want to eat it, go for it!

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Posts: 7 | From Japan | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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Tom, I agree. Randi, an asp sting has nothing to do with bees. Those asps hurt like H***!!!

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95730 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sparkle7
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I used to take royal jelly. The kind I used was in glass vials from China. I don't know if I would take that any more since it's from China. You really don't know what's in it...

The other thing is that bees have been subject to Colony Collapse. They don't know what is causing this & it may be from a virus.

If this is the case, I would make sure any bee products that you use are from organic bees since it is a concentrated product.

The organic bees are not really having this problem from what I have read.

I think the extra energy is from the sugar in the honey/jelly. I like bee products but I'm not sure if they will cure what ails ya...

Raw honey is known to be anti-bacterial so it might be good to put on a cut or scrape. I just don't think it's strong enough to really kill hard core bacteria like MRSA. Maybe in a petri dish but not in the real world...

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randibear
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you know when i tell people i've been bitten by an asp they immediately think "ah, snake..".

no, really, there is a wasplike insect in texas that we call asps. i went to an outdoor aviation show and got stung.

by the time i got home i could hardly breathe, my neck was beet red with streaks going into my chest and i ended up in the ER.

that was one time they paid attention. gave me something like benadryl, but it as a shot....

man was i sick.....so i'm afraid of all bees and those beelike little things,

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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