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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » MOSQUITOES, TICKS AND FLEAS CDC

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Author Topic: MOSQUITOES, TICKS AND FLEAS CDC
Lymeblue
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"Lyme disease is the most common of all the diseases in the United States transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas,"

http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2007/r070614.htm

For Immediate Release:
June 14, 2007
Contact: Lola Russell
CDC Media Relations
Phone: (404) 639-3286


CDC Reports High Lyme Disease Rates in 10 States
Number of the most common vector-borne disease doubles in 15 years
Reported cases of Lyme disease have more than doubled since 1991, when Lyme became a nationally notifiable disease, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report also said 93 percent of reported cases were concentrated in 10 states.

"This increase in cases is most likely the result of both a true increase in the frequency of the disease as well as better recognition and reporting due to enhanced detection of cases," said Dr. Paul Mead, a medical epidemiologist with the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases.

Lyme disease is the most common of all the diseases in the United States transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas, with approximately 20,000 cases reported each year. It most commonly occurs in the Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic, and North-Central states. Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Wisconsin had the most cases. The report says that during 2003-2005, a total of 64,382 Lyme disease cases were reported to CDC from 46 states and the District of Columbia.

In 1991 fewer than 10,000 cases of Lyme disease were reported.

Most illnesses occurred in June, July and August, when the infected ticks that carry the disease are most active. Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi which is transmitted to humans by tick bite.

From 2003-2005, the incidence of Lyme disease in the cases reported higher rates among two age groups-children aged 5 to 14 years (10 cases per 100,000 population per year) and adults aged 55 to 64 years (9.9 cases per 100,000 population per year).

Early symptoms of infection include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. Left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system.

People should watch for symptoms especially in these areas with intense Lyme disease transmission, and see a health care provider if these develop. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious illness and long-term complications.

"While this increase is of concern, these rates highlight the need to focus on prevention of this disease. People living in areas where Lyme disease is most frequently reported can take proactive steps to reduce their risk of infection," Dr. Mead said.

Prevention steps include daily tick checks (self examination for ticks), use of repellent containing 20 percent or more DEET, selective use of insecticides that target ticks, and the avoidance of tick-infested areas. Removing ticks within 24 hours of attachment greatly reduces the likelihood of disease transmission. Tick populations around homes and in recreational areas can be reduced 50 to 90 percent through simple landscaping practices such as removing brush and leaf litter, and creating a buffer zone of wood chips or gravel between forest and lawn or recreational areas.

The full report, "Lyme Disease - United States, 2003-2005," appears in this week′s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (June 14, 2007) and is available online at www.cdc.gov/mmwr.

Additional information about Lyme disease can be found on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/lyme, and about other tick-borne diseases at http://www.cdc.gov/Features/StopTicks/.

###

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

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sparkle7
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It's kind of odd they would be saying this... mosquitos & fleas???

I don't really know what to say. Mosquitos & fleas are everywhere.

Do they really think it can be transmitted through mosquitoes & fleas?

We're in trouble if that is the case... From my studies, there has to be the tick saliva for transmission.

There is other data on the report that is incorrect, such as the number of cases.

I'd be interested in what others have to say.

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Angelica
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I believe it is in mosquitoes, fleas sand flies, bedbugs and horse flies to name a few insects that bite. Mosquitoes spread Malaria so why would they not spread LD? Fleas spread the plague long ago.

I was badly bitten by fleas and started to get increased symptoms. I bet they carry bart. 40 percent of the cats in Calif. are known to carry bart so why wouldn't their fleas?

I know someone who believes they received Morgellons from bedbugs. Someone on Canlyme believes they received LD with a bulls eye rash from a horse fly bite.

Probably ticks spread the most LD but biting insects probably spread and carry it and who knows what else as well.

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sparkle7
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Malaria is very different from Lyme. It's more like thinking that you could get syphilis from mosquitoes, fleas, & ticks...

Bart has been found in fleas - it's not that big of a stretch. Even though it's considered a co-infection... it's very different from Lyme & you don't have to have Lyme to have Bart or vise vera.

Lyme is a spirochete. The co-infections are different types of bacteria, protozoa, etc. I'm not very familiar with them since I don't think I have them. They are very different from Lyme, though.

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FuzzySlippers
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http://tiny.cc/Rijy5

Ticks and mosquitoes as vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. in the forested areas of Szczecin.


Kosik-Bogacka DI, Kuźna-Grygiel W, Jaborowska M.

Department of Biology and Medical Parasitology, Pomeranian Medical University, Powstancow Wielkopolskich Av. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland. [email protected]


The aim of the study was to determine the infection level of adult forms and larvae of ticks and mosquitoes with Borrelia burgdorferi in the forested areas of Szczecin.

A total of 1699 ticks Ixodes ricinus, including 1422 nymphs, 277 adult forms and 2862 mosquito females representing the genera Aedes (89.6%) and Culex (10.4%) were collected between the years 2004 and 2005.

A further 3746 larvae and 1596 pupae of Culex pipiens pipiens were colleted from water bodies. Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. was detected in the arthropods by the method of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA).

A positive immunological reaction was detected in 16.6% of the adult forms and in 16.5% of the nymphs of Ixodes ricinus. Spirochetes were also detected in 1.7% of mosquito females, 3.2% of larvae and in 1.6% of pupae of Culex pipiens pipiens.

The results of the present study confirm that contact with ticks constitutes the main risk of contracting Lyme disease, although mosquitoes play a role as vectors as well.

PMID: 18274258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


**************

Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(2):345-8.

Isolation of Borrelia afzelii from overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus mosquitoes.

* Zakovska A, Capkova L, Sery O, Halouzka J, Dendis M.
Department of Comparative Animal Physiology and General Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno, Czech Republic. [email protected]

A total of 662 samples (winter period: 469; summer period: 193 specimens) of female mosquitoes of the genus Culex, Aedes and Anopheles were collected during the period March 2000-April 2001 from the locality of Vysoke Myto (Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic). They were examined by dark field microscopy for the presence of spirochetes.

The motile spirochetes were observed in 4.2% of all species of investigated mosquitoes. One spirochetal strain out of the 8 isolation attempts (BRZ14) was obtained (cultivation rate was 12.5 %) and the spirochetal strain was then successfully cultivated and identified using PCR for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., and subsequently with the RFLP as genomospecies Borrelia afzelii.

This strain was derived from overwintering Culex (Culex) pipiens biotype molestus female mosquitoe. This is apparently one of the sporadic cases of the occurrence of pathogenic borreliae in haematophagous arthropods, other than Ixodes ricinus complex ticks.

PMID: 17199258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


*********************

More studies in this recent Lymenet Thread:
http://tinyurl.com/5wg6b4

And you can also have a look here:
http://tinyurl.com/yuzf78

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lymebytes
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All biting insects carry Lyme that feed on blood..confirm w/your LLMD. There are confirmed human cases of this.

--------------------
www.truthaboutlymedisease.com

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Hoosiers51
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I think the headline means that of all the diseases carried by those three bugs, Lyme is the most common.
It isn't saying Lyme is carried by fleas and mosquitoes. Does that make sense?

I think it is just a badly worded headline.

I am not sure if those insects really can or can't carry Lyme.....but I am saying that I don't think how we are interpreting it is what the CDC meant.

Besides, I believe ticks are arachnids (spelling?) like spiders because they have 8 legs.....so you can't even prove it by saying, "well, they're all insects."

I would expect spiders to carry it before fleas and mosquitoes.

I'm not saying they DON'T carry it though.

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ldfighter
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I agree with Hoosiers, CDC is just saying of all diseases transmitted by vectors Lyme is the most common. Not that mosquitoes and fleas transmit Lyme.

Their position on transmission is at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/LYME/ld_transmission.htm

Here the CDC says "no credible evidence" yet there was a letter published in NEJM which had a case report involving a biting fly (cut and paste the following into browser, lymenet wouldn't let me post it as a link)
cassia.org/library/N_Engl_J_Med_1990_Jun_14,322(24),1752.htm

And an article from 1988 for those who are interested
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=266646

I think more research is needed. Seems a little crazy of CDC to discount the possibility.

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UnexpectedIlls
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Well Guess what.. the start of my lyme symptoms started with 100's of flea bites from a rescued outside kitten..... It is POSSIBLE....

There are cases of this happening and I believe that is exactly what the CDC was saying.

Mosquitos are nasty... they feed off of blood

Fleas are nasty..... Fleas that bite lyme infected dogs and cats that bite humans can trasmit lyme to a human.. There is nothing difficult or crazy about that.

"Lyme disease is the most common of all the diseases in the United States transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas",

There exact words... CDC...

--------------------
"You'll be surprised to know how far you can go from the point you thought it was the end"

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sparkle7
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From what I've read, the tick saliva is important to the infection process.

If spriochetes are in fleas & mosquitoes - they may not have the same chemistry as a tick during the infection process to pass the bacteria.

A definite chemical reaction happens in the tick's body when it bites a host. It's helps the bacteria gain a foothold in the host. The tick's saliva suppresses the host's immune system.

If it were spread easily it would also be spread by blood transfusions. Is there anyone here who got Lyme after receiving blood?

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Hoosiers51
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Actually, I believe there are cases of Lyme being transmitted by blood transfusion. People who have (or in my opinion, have had) Lyme should NOT give blood!

If you think about it though, tick saliva or no tick saliva, you obviously don't want infected blood in you! [Smile]

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FuzzySlippers
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hi sparkle,

I don't know whether this will help answer your query about lyme and blood transfusions. But, here is some info anyway. :-)


Survival of Borrelia burgdorferi in human blood stored under blood banking conditions
RB Nadelman; C Sherer; L Mack; CS Pavia; GP Wormser
Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla.
Copyright
ABSTRACT

Hematogenous dissemination of organisms occurs in many spirochetal diseases, including Lyme disease and syphilis. Although syphilis has been transmitted by transfusion, in the vast majority of cases, only fresh blood products were involved, in part because Treponema pallidum survives poorly when refrigerated in citrated blood. Because of the rising incidence of Lyme disease in certain areas, whether its causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, could survive under blood banking conditions was studied. Dilutions of stock cultures of two strains of B. burgdorferi were inoculated into samples of citrated red cells (RBCs). Viable spirochetes were recovered from RBCs inoculated with 10(6) organisms per mL, after refrigeration for as long as 6 weeks. It is concluded that B. burgdorferi may survive storage under blood banking conditions and that transfusion-related Lyme disease is theoretically possible.


DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER (DOI)
10.1046/j.1537-2995.1990.30490273434.x About DOI


******************

Infusionstherapie. 1989 Dec;16(6):248-51.
Related Articles, Links

Prevalence of Erythema migrans Borreliosis in blood donors.

Schmidt R, Gollmer E, Zunser R, Krger J, Ackermann R.

Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Cologne, FRG.

European Erythema migrans Borreliosis and North American Lyme disease are closely related to syphilis. This implicates a potential risk of infection for blood recipients. Eighty-six of 3,157 blood donors tested showed IgG-antibodies against Borrelia Burgdorferi. From among 47 persons of this group who could be examined, clinical signs of diseased skin, joints or nervous system, not diagnosed before, were found or could be suspected in 13 cases. Since intrauterine transmission of Borrelia infection has been described, the inevitable question of whether this disease can also be transmitted as a result of blood transfusion becomes a major concern. As the pathogen can persist even in the presence of serum antibodies, it seems advisable to examine blood donors serologically, whenever Erythema migrans Borreliosis is suspected. Though further research is required to document a transfusion-transmitted Borrelia infection, infected persons should be treated to avoid serious or late manifestations.

PMID: 2625363 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


**********************


J Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;162(2):557-9.
Related Articles, Links

Borrelia burgdorferi: survival in experimentally infected human blood processed for transfusion.

Johnson SE, Swaminathan B, Moore P, Broome CV, Parvin M.

Meningitis and Special Pathogens Branch, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.

The isolation of Borrelia burgdorferi from blood raises the possibility of bloodborne transmission of Lyme borreliosis through transfusions. To assess this possibility, the ability of B. burgdorferi to survive in human blood processed for transfusion was studied. Human blood was inoculated with B. burgdorferi type strain B-31 (ATCC 35210) at 0.2, 20, or 2000 viable cells/ml, processed by conventional blood banking procedures, stored at 4 degrees C, and cultured for B. burgdorferi at 12, 23, 36, and 48 days of storage. After processing, most B. burgdorferi were found in the packed cell fraction. At inoculum levels of 20 or 2000 viable cells/ml, B. burgdorferi survived in processed blood through 48 days of storage at 4 degrees C. B. burgdorferi was isolated from packed cells after 36 days of storage at 4 degrees C even when the initial inoculum level was as low as 0.2 cells/ml. The data demonstrate that B. burgdorferi can survive the blood processing procedures normally applied to transfused blood in the USA. Since hematogenous spread of the spirochete seems to occur early in the illness, primarily in symptomatic patients, the risk of transfusion-associated Lyme disease may be small. However, the possibility of survival of B. burgdorferi under blood banking conditions warrants a heightened awareness of this potential problem.

PMID: 2373880 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


******************

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tailz
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I used to get bull's eye rashes around my mosquito bites as a kid (once again several years ago), and I ended up on antidepressants/antianxiety meds about a year after renting a flea-infested townhouse. I was bitten daily by fleas for that entire year - even pulled one that was feeding off my lip.

Mosquitos and fleas are what did this to me - not ticks. So definitely - we're in trouble. It isn't just ticks!

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tailz
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Wow. I can't believe the number of posters here who are questioning that fleas and mosquitos can transmit Lyme.

This forum never ceases to amaze me.

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Hoosiers51
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What's wrong with questioning things?
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UnexpectedIlls
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It's pretty well documented that lyme is transmitted by fleas, mosquitos Etc..

Hoos, No problem questioning... [Smile]

--------------------
"You'll be surprised to know how far you can go from the point you thought it was the end"

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FuzzySlippers
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I think the questions are good.
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tailz
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I don't know - maybe questions are irking my parietal lobes and insular cortex today?

Or maybe I just think it is logical for someone who does not recall a tick bite, but does recall a flea bite and mosquito bite, to be believed?

I got my bugs from fleas and mosquitos, and I can see already that I'm going to die before the 'tickborne disease' label is dropped.

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Hoosiers51
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tailz----

I hope you didn't find what I said before to be insulting. I can understand how you feel, and it IS frustrating! It is annoying not knowing.

It is hard to know if it was fleas, or a tick you never saw, right? I think it is obviously an area that needs more research.

If they CAN transmit Lyme, how often do they actually transmit Lyme? It is hard to know. I think everyone has to come up with their own answers on what they believe, because it's hard to know what is true and what isn't these days.

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kelmo
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quote:
Do they really think it can be transmitted through mosquitoes & fleas?

We really need to think beyond the tick. My daughter and I were never bitten by a tick that we know of.

We have been bitten by mosquitoes, and she had a repeated lice infestation in first grade (original infested friend wouldn't get treatment but was allowed back in school)

However, neither of us have been positive for Lyme, only bart, babesia, mycoplasma et al.

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shazdancer
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I am with Hoosiers and ldfighter on this one. It may be true that Lyme is spread by vectors in addition to ticks. It's just that the CDC is talking about Lyme as compared to all vector-borne diseases in that sentence. The CDC is not yet declaring that Lyme is spread by other bugs.

-- Shaz

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sparkle7
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I still think there are alot of things that aren't very clear about this.

1. Why isn't there public awareness about Lyme & donating blood? I wouldn't donate blood but there are alot of people who are ill & have no idea that they may have Lyme. It took me 10 years to find out that I had Lyme. From the studies posted, they've know about this for a long time. These studies are from 1989 & 1990...

2. The co-infections have many similarities with Lyme. People bitten by mosquitos & fleas, etc. may actually have the co-infections like bart, babesia, mycoplasmas, etc. & not Lyme. It seems the co-infections can be worse than Lyme.

3. There would be more incidence of Lyme if it were easily spread by mosquitos & fleas.

4. Testing is inadequate for all of these things, period. How does anyone know for sure what they actually have?

5. What about West Nile Virus? West Nile is actually supposed to be spread by mosquitoes. Why is there almost no info about that in public media these days? Did it just go away?

I am not saying that it isn't possible to get Lyme from things like sexual contact, blood infusions, fleas, flies, etc. It's just that there are many loose ends.

Lyme has been effecting people here for over 30 years. You would think there would be more awareness.

When AIDS & HIV started affecting gay men in NYC back in the late 70's - early 80's - it was a huge issue! People took notice & precautions.

People don't want to hear about the dangers of Lyme. They usually get this glazed over look in their eyes & change the subject.

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Geneal
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Dear Sparkle,

Believe it or not in our "backwards" state [shake] , if you go to donate blood,

There is a questionaire you must fill out.

If you have ever been diagnosed with Lyme disease you must wait until you have

Been declared "cured" for 5 years prior to blood donation.

If you've ever been diagnosed with babesia, you can never donate blood. Never ever.

So there is awareness, just not on the news.

AliG (Thanks! [Smile] ) Sent me a slew of confirmed findings of Lyme in mosquitoes,

Which I gave to our local Mosquito abatement program.

Hugs,

Geneal

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Mtgirl
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The sentence that launched this post reads "Lyme disease is the most common of all the diseases in the United States transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas, with approximately 20,000 cases reported each year. " Meaning: of all vector born diseases, Lyme Disease is the most common.

Regardless if Lyme and co are ACTUALLY transmitted by other vectors (which they probably are), the CDC is NOT stating that Lyme is spread by mosquitoes and fleas.

Do you really think the CDC would put the time, effort, and money for research into finding out the other vectors for Lyme??? [bonk]

[ 23. July 2008, 11:36 AM: Message edited by: Mtgirl ]

--------------------
Mountaingirl

"What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us."
~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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adamm
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They and all of their psychopathic NATO buddies

actually have researched other vectors for Lyme...

and destroyed thousands more lives as a result.

Forgot where I read this...but I know that it is documented.

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sparkle7
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re: blood donation...

I didn't have any idea I had Lyme until 9+ years after infection. How many people are walking around sick & don't know they have Lyme?

How about the co-infections?

I agree with you Adamm.

I think The CDC is just covering it's bases... it just seems like more disinformation to me.

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Nessa1815
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Ruskin, FL. where we used to live, is INFESTED with mosquitoes. I never saw a tick on me. Never. I'm surprised that the CDC admitted this. I'm not shocked. But I do wonder if more people would have it if this were true?

--------------------
"~*~My smile hides my bite~*~."

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lpkayak
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the first statement from cdc is 2007. i think i remember this-there was a big blow up about it. then they changed their statement. to the one ldfighter posted i guess.

this has happened before. some truth comes out by accident and then they go back and "fix" it

the research shows Bb is in lots of bugs. so far it doesn't show they can transmit it. no one has done a study yet.

the cdc also says ld can't be transmitted thru placenta and breast milk. again-it may not have been studied yet-in a 10 yr double blind blah blah blah...but what do you think dr jones says? where are all his infant patients coming from?

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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AmyPW8
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Yes, I too am shocked. There have been documented cases of EM rash, the one and only obvious and accepted indicator of lyme disease in modern medicine, after bites from spiders, fleas, chiggers, mosquitos, lice, and biting flies. And I might add that some of those bites were documented by emergency rooms. So there is no doubt about it.

The research is there you just have to look for it. I would think any blood borne pathogen can be transmitted by critters that suck blood. Logic would tell us that if it can be transmitted from the saliva of a tick, then the saliva of any biting insect would work as well. Wouldn't ya think? I don't think the bacteria is that selective. I mean, I understand they have outsmarted conventional medicine but...spit is spit! [Wink]

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Amy

Diagnosed April 29, 2007.

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Hoosiers51
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"Most illnesses occurred in June, July and August, when the infected ticks that carry the disease are most active. Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi which is transmitted to humans by tick bite."

I took that quote directly from the CDC thing posted above. Seriously you guys......the CDC is not saying IN THIS ABSTRACT (article, whatever you want to call it) listed above that mosquitoes and fleas carry Lyme. Sorry to rain on your parade.

Once again, I'm not saying mosquitoes and fleas don't transmit it, but can we please stop misreading this article? I feel like we are only making ourselves look bad here.

If we want to debate the likely possibility that mosquitoes and fleas can transmit it, let's not start the debate by posting a very straightforward article (albeit, poorly worded) and then misreading it. We are taking away any validity we may claim to have on this matter.

Thank you.

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Hoosiers51
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PS----ticks aren't "insects" they are arachnids. I'm really not trying to be a know-it-all, i'm just letting you guys know so you will be able to speak about Lyme in a more informed manner.
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AmyPW8
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I didn't misread it. It doesn't sound like they (CDC) were coming out and saying that Lyme is transmitted by mosquitos and fleas. Then again, they wouldn't do that now anyway. Timing is off.

The question was that a reader said that couldn't be what it meant because that wasn't possible. That would be incorrect. [shake]

OH, my lymie life.

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Amy

Diagnosed April 29, 2007.

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Nessa1815
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It seemed to me that it clearly stated that they were transmitted by ticks, mosquitoes, and fleas.

What caught my husband's eye is that this was from 2007. Over a year ago. Any thoughts on that?

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"~*~My smile hides my bite~*~."

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Angelica
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In my humble opinion many insects can spread Lyme disease.

I also think we need to keep in mind that many people who never saw a tick but did test positive for LD might not have seen or ever felt a tick if one did bite them. They can be very very tiny and hard to feel or detect. Pets carry them and you do not have to go walking in the woods to get a tick bite.

I believe a study was done where half the people included in the study which was done in San Francisco tested positive for tick salvia or some high percentage of people. I think many of us have been bitten more than once by ticks and did not know it at the time.

Dr. B. talks about how in a study the first time a horse receives a bite by a tick with LD the horse has no symptoms. Six months later with another LD tick bite the horse gets LD symptoms.

Ticks and insects carry LD.

[ 24. July 2008, 04:32 PM: Message edited by: Angelica ]

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UnexpectedIlls
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CDC... Yeah we should REALLY listen to them!

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"You'll be surprised to know how far you can go from the point you thought it was the end"

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Hoosiers51
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Just to clarify....I'm not saying we should listen to the CDC, and I'm not saying insects don't transmit Lyme!

I'm saying the CDC worded their article badly.

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UnexpectedIlls
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They sure did... but I wouldn't expect anything less... or more!

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"You'll be surprised to know how far you can go from the point you thought it was the end"

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sparkle7
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Not to be picky but tick saliva is special. It has different chemicals than the other potential carriers...

Tick are very small. It's very possible to be bitten & have no idea. Many people don't get EMs.

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Nessa1815
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Well, there's a number on there. I'm going to call them and ask them what they meant. Is that bad to do or not?

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"~*~My smile hides my bite~*~."

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