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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Manuka Honey Kills Resistant Superbug Bacteria that Antibiotics Can't

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Author Topic: Manuka Honey Kills Resistant Superbug Bacteria that Antibiotics Can't
Angelica
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August, 2008

Manuka Honey Kills Resistant Superbug Bacteria that Antibiotics Can't

By David Gutierrez

According to biochemist Peter Molan, who has researched natural antibiotics including honey for 25 years, manuka honey is effective at killing even the most antibiotic resistant bacteria even when it has been diluted to a tenth of its original concentration.

(Natural News) A honey-based dressing for wounds is effective even on injuries that are resistant to antibiotics, according to New Jersey manufacturer Derma Sciences Inc.

The product, called Medihoney, is made from an absorbent material based on seaweed, and saturated with a variety of honey known as manuka, or Leptospermum, honey.

The honey is produced by bees that have collected nectar from manuka and jelly bushes, which grow in Australia and New Zealand.

According to biochemist Peter Molan, who has researched natural antibiotics including honey for 25 years, manuka honey is effective at killing even the most antibiotic resistant bacteria even when it has been diluted to a tenth of its original concentration.

"There's more evidence, clinical evidence, by far for honey in wound treatment than for any of the pharmaceutical products," Molan said. He recommends it in particular for people with weak immune systems.

"It's been used on wounds where nothing else will work," he said.

Medihoney is already being used in hospitals, doctors' offices and other medical settings in both North and South America. Similar products have been popular in Australia, New Zealand and Europe for more than 10 years.

The honey-based dressings are effective at absorbing fluids and killing germs for up to a week, making them ideal in settings where it is difficult to change dressings regularly.

They also reduce inflammation and foul wound odors better than traditional, pharmaceutical-based dressings.

Emergency physician Craig Lambrecht said that he began using a manuka-honey based dressing to treat children with severe burns at a military clinic in Iraq last winter.

The honey dressings soon became more popular with Iraqi families than conventional dressings because they were more natural and easier to use.

In addition, Lambrecht found that the children treated with honey healed faster and experienced fewer complications than children treated with conventional dressings.

"I would use the Medihoney on burns on my children, as the first choice, without question," Lambrecht said.

http://www.naturalnews.com

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efsd25
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Awesome, thanks for posting this info Angelica. Have you tried taking this?
Posts: 546 | From Cascadia subduction zone | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SickRI
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Thanks for the article.

I am curious. The article says some hospitals use it. Which hospitals?

I would like to tell my doctor about those hospitals.

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sparkle7
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I posted alot of info about this. You may want to do a search of bee venom honey on this website.

I think the studies of wound healing were done in New Zealand or Ireland.

Also, check this website - http://www.apihealth.com/

I think they have links to further info here.

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Angelica
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I have never tried taking this yet but Sparkle does know more about this kind of honey then I do.

My friend was talking to a local honey sales person at a farmers market here yesterday and they seemed to know a lot about this kind of honey as well.

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sparkle7
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Here's alot of links to info about manuka honey -

http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=&q=manuka+honey&btnG=Google+Search

It's a special kind of honey. It's not the same as regular honey that you can buy here in the stores. I have seem manuka honey in Whole Foods, though.

I really think that the bee venom can kill spirochetes. A gov't lab tested it & there's a study about it in vitro.

I think it's worth looking into. I was taking it but I stopped since I was using the LightWorks & had a big herx from the infrared light.

-----
From Wikipedia

Manuka honey is from bees who feed on the flowers of the Manuka bush, also known as the "Tea Tree" to produce a honey that has anti-bacterial properties.

Tea tree oil is commonly from the related Melaleuca tree native to Australia and is used as a topical antibiotic and antifungal for wounds that fail to close.[4]

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hiker53
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I see the use of manuka honey on wounds, but would it work inside the body or get digested too quickly?

Hiker53

--------------------
Hiker53

"God is light. In Him there is no
darkness." 1John 1:5

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JR
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Hiker- that's what I was wondering. I did not follow the links, but it seems that ingesting it would be diferent from using it on the skin.
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