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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Is Pepto-Bismol ok to take?

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Author Topic: Is Pepto-Bismol ok to take?
tickled1
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My stomach is really ripped up. It's my own fault b/c I had a couple of drinks last night. Big mistake! Anyway, I'm on Biaxin and Plaquenil. Is it ok to take a dose of pepto-bismol?

I checked drugs.com to see if there's an interaction and there isn't but I just want to double check on here to see if there's any reason why I shouldn't take it. Thanks!

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Pammy
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My stomach has been awful too, so I asked the pharmacist if I could take Pepto.

He said it would decrease the absorption of the abx I was on. I've heard that before.

Not sure if it's for all abx or just the one I was on. You could probably call a pharmacist and ask.

Maybe just take it a few hours after your abx.

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charlie
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I'm pretty sure it's OK with biaxin but pepto's a No No with the tetracyclines incl doxy and mino...the 'Bismol' stands for bismuth which is a metal...wipes tetracyclines out.

Charlie

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Keebler
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I'm not sure the meds you are taking can go into a stomach when the lining has been irritated (from the drinks). You may need to get your stomach healed some before resuming the abx. An ulcer &/or bleeding could result, depending upon how irritated it is.


Pepto Bismol contains salicylates (from aspirin and from bismuth subsalicylate), it should be avoided in anyone who might have a virus - it could trigger Reyes syndrome. Reyes in not just something kids get, adult can, too.

Many lyme patients also have high viral loads, so I'd be cautious.

Can you ask your doctor about all this? Especially as to when it is safe to put potent medicines back into your stomach.


DGL (deglyz. licorice) and slippery elm are very soothing to the stomach. A little L-glutamate is, too. Too much of that, though, can be too excitatory. Otherwise, it is fabulous to help heal the tissue.

Hope you feel better soon.

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tickled1
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Thanks everyone for your replies. I did end up taking the pepto last night before getting any replies. It helped off the bat but then I woke during the night with my stomach feeling really bad again. I took some Tums which seemed to help a little.

Strange thing is, the last couple of times I've had a drink (maybe once or twice a month), I have a headache 2 days later. What does THAT mean?

I guess I better email my LLMD to see if I need to take a short abx break. I wonder if the break would be a good time to do a 10 day round of Diflucan or if the Diflucan would irritate my stomach even more. Guess that's another question for the dr.

I also did try slippery elm earlier in the day yesterday and it helped right off the bat but not for long. I wasn't sure how much to take though. I took 2 tsp.

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MariaA
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Peptobismol, biaxin, and amoxycillin are a combo used for ulcer treatment. I don't know what it would do to plaquenil and I would definitely talk to an LLMD first. Perhaps if he/she determines you have an ulcer they'd put you on these meds, which also hit LYme, so you're not just getting an antibiotic break.

Alcohol and Lyme are a big no-no for many, many people, and alcohol and some antibiotics are as well. Sounds like your body is responding badly to it, so come join us in the clean and sober club...

--------------------
Symptom Free!!! Thank you all!!!!

Find me at Lymefriends, I post under the same name.
diet: http://lymefriends.ning.com/group/healthylowcarbrecipes
Homemade Probiotics thread
Herbal Links Thread

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tickled1
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After this I'll have no problem joining the clean, sober and sugar-free club! [lol]
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Keebler
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-

Hey, at the beginning of this, many of us were tossed on the floor by even a few sips. Other than infection, here are a few reasons why:

www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2630.html

Go Ask Alice! (Columbia Univeristy's Health Q & A site)

Question: Suddenly, drinking alcohol makes me sick! Why?


(Excerpts from) Answer:

Factors relating to metabolic tolerance might help explain why you're feeling sick from one drink. Alcohol is absorbed primarily from the stomach and small intestine and metabolized mainly in the liver by an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).


If insufficient ADH is produced in the liver, the body will not be able to metabolize alcohol.

A second enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), also plays a role in metabolism. Some people lack ALDH, which is often associated with facial flushing, sweating, and/or becoming ill after drinking small amounts of alcohol. . . .


Other than metabolism, why else might you feel uncomfortable or sick after one drink?

An irritated stomach: Alcohol directly irritates the esophagus, stomach, and intestines, causing inflammation of the stomach lining.

LIVER: Alcohol increases the production of gastric (stomach) acid, and can also cause a build up of triglycerides (fat compounds and free fatty acids) in liver cells.

Any of these factors can result in nausea or vomiting.

. . . .

Medication: Alcohol can be harmful, even in small amounts, when consumed in conjunction with certain medications and/or other drugs.

To learn more about the interaction of alcohol and medications, check out, "Harmful Interactions: Mixing Alcohol with Medicines," published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

[That link is: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/Medicine/medicine.htm ]

. . . .

-----------------------------


And the answer above does not even go into chronic stealth infections that affect every system of the body. Even just the effects on blood sugar and the pancreas are huge.


The Potbelly book does. It is specific to lyme and other chronic stealth infections. The author discusses the endocrine connection and effects on that from this illness. Singleton's book (The Lyme Disease Solution) also discusses the changes of the endocrine connection for lyme patients and what can help.


You can read customer reviews and look inside the book at this link to its page at Amazon.

http://tinyurl.com/6xse7l


The Potbelly Syndrome: How Common Germs Cause Obesity, Diabetes, And Heart Disease (Paperback) - 2005


by Russell Farris and Per Marin, MD, PhD


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