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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Saw my LLMD today-update on vertigo

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Author Topic: Saw my LLMD today-update on vertigo
Nal
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The vertigo is still just as bad. He is sending me to an ENT dr-I see them on Friday. Theres still fluid that keeps accumulating in my right ear. It isn't an infection but it isn't going away either.

He strongly feels I have vestibular neuritis. He put me on a diuretic and Ativan. The hope is that the diuretic will help with the fluid build up and the ativan can have anti vertigo properties. All I know is im so dizzy i cant stand myself and i cant sit up for long periods of time.

So what is vestibular neuritis anyway?

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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tickbattler
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I don't know what it is, but I'm curious, does your doctor think this fluid and vertigo are caused by your tick-borne infections?

Thanks,

tickbattler

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Keebler
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Basically, vestibular neuritis is an inflammation of the nerve, often caused by an infection of some type (viral, bacterial, fungal) or, perhaps, allergies.

The inflammation and swelling keeps fluid from moving on out. The pressure, even if in just one ear, can create a domino effect on a person's balance system, affecting many human functions such as walking, talking, even thinking . . . . and, especially, the ability to focus one's eyes.


Structural problems can also be a cause, including trauma from accidents, too.


You should be resting at a 20- 30 degree angle with your head higher than legs. This is the only position that gives the inner ear any sort of chance for circulation for healing.

I hope you feel much better and that the ENT has great solutions for you.


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Keebler
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From the VEDA site:


http://vestibular.org/vestibular-disorders/specific-disorders/labyrinthitisvest-neuritis.php?searchresult=1&sstring=vestibular+neuritis


Labyrinthitis and Vestibular Neuritis


Labyrinthitis and vestibular neuritis are disorders resulting from an infection that inflames the inner ear or the vestibulo-cochlear nerve (the eighth cranial nerve), which connects the inner ear to the brain. Vertigo, dizziness, and difficulties with balance, vision, or hearing may result.


Infections of the inner ear are usually viral; less commonly, the cause is bacterial. Although the symptoms of bacterial and viral infections may be similar, the treatments are very different, so proper diagnosis by a physician is essential.

Such inner ear infections are not the same as middle ear infections, which are the type of bacterial infections common in childhood affecting the area around the eardrum.


Neuritis (inflammation of the nerve) affects the vestibular branch of the vestibulo-cochlear nerve, resulting in dizziness or vertigo but no change in hearing.

The term neuronitis is also used. Labyrinthitis (inflammation of the labyrinth) occurs when an infection affects both branches of the nerve, resulting in hearing changes as well as dizziness or vertigo.


An inner ear viral infection may be the result of a systemic viral illness (one affecting the rest of the body, such as infectious mononucleosis or measles); or the infection may be confined to the labyrinth or the vestibulo-cochlear nerve. Usually, only one ear is affected.


Symptoms of neuritis can be mild or severe, ranging from subtle dizziness to a violent spinning sensation (vertigo). They can also include nausea, vomiting, unsteadiness and imbalance, difficulty with vision, and impaired concentration.


Sometimes the symptoms can be so severe that they affect the ability to sit up, stand, or walk. Labyrinthitis may produce the same symptoms, along with tinnitus (ringing or noises in the ear) and/or hearing loss.


- cont'd at link above.


===============

From Dr. Hain's site (similar to the one Nal posted yesterday):


www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/unilat/vneurit.html

Vestibular Neuritis and Labyrinthitis - by Timothy C. Hain, MD


Great illustration here.


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Nal
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I muscle tested negative for this being related to the tick borne stuff. However, he said he couldn't totally rule it out so its up to the ENT to determine whats going on.

Im tired of it-that much I know. I guess this stuff takes weeks to clear though?

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

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Keebler
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Yes, it can take weeks. And, I really don't want to be pessimistic here, but it can take much longer, too.

I know you are scared but just take really good care of yourself. I'd call friends or relatives to help with your kids. How much rest your ears can get now can determine how long this will go on.

I also strongly suggest taking allicin, andrographis or olive leaf extract. I've dealt with inner ear disorders for years and these have been the best help, in addition to GINGER.


And, this is just my opinion here, but I'm not sure muscle testing is totally effective to indicate if this is lyme related. It may not be lyme but some sort of infection is likely. Allicin will cover many bases in that regard, whether bacterial, viral or fungal.


If lyme evades even the most sophiticated lab tests, I think it can evade when we ask our bodies "is this lyme" - there are many ways that lyme can trick and hide from detection.


But, again, allicin or freeze dried garlic capsules are just the solutions that I think best coverage if candida is a player, too. Andrographis, Olive Leaf Extract are two other options and, these can also be added to Rx treatment for neurolyme.


Cranial-sacral therapy might be excellent relief, too. Actually having someone go into your mouth and manipulate tissue to open up the Eustachian tube can be like magic.

I apologize if I come off strongly here. I have been through it all with my ears and anything that might keep someone else from repeating all that I feel compelled to share. Others here may share their experiences and I know that some of folks who have gone the full RX route have done well, too.


As knowledge is power, see what the ENT has to say. I hope it goes well. He will likely order some more tests for next week but he will do some clinical evaluation in his office. I am just very glad that your LLMD referred you so this ENT should know about lyme.


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[ 12. November 2008, 07:07 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

vestibular neuritis, viral - 63 abstracts

vestibular neuritis, fungal - 5 abstracts


vestibular, lyme - 12 abstracts

vestibular, borreliosis - 15 abstracts

Eustachian, borreliosis - one abstract

vestibular neuritis, borreliosis - 4 abstracts

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One of those, showing how neurolyme can be misdiagnosed - " . . . In the majority of the cases, the disease [lyme] resembles vestibular neuronitis in the acute stage . . ." :


NEUROBORRELIOSIS IN THE ETIOLOGY OF VESTIBULAR NEURONITIS

Ishizaki H, Pyykk I, Nozue M.


Department of Otolaryngology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Japan.


Symptoms and incidence of neuroborreliosis (NB) were studied in ambulatory patients visiting the ENT clinic in Helsinki.


Especially we tried to search for possible markers indicating the connection between vestibular neuronitis and NB. A total of 350 patients were screened with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique for possible antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi (BB).


Twelve patients had positive serological reactions for BB with sera titer levels ranging from 640-14700 (normal < 500). In 2 additional cases, NB was clinically confirmed. In 7 cases a history of tick bite and in 4 cases erythema chronicum migrans was confirmed.


In 9 cases, vertigo was the predominant symptom, and in 3 cases the symptoms were linked to facial nerve paresis. Six patients suffered from hearing loss.


In 7 cases, the diagnosis was initially settled as vestibular neuronitis. NB seems to be present in about 4% of cases with apparent otologic diseases in Finland.


In the majority of the cases, the disease resembles vestibular neuronitis in the acute stage.

Since NB is tractable, all patients visiting the ENT clinic, especially those with vertigo, should be screened.


PMID: 8470505

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Nal
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I will try the andrograhpis a try again. My llmd recommends it. Muscle testing isnt a sure fire way to determine things but believe me when i say 99% of the muscle testing I have done through him has been most effective.

I just want some relief-soon. I have to go back to work soon too.

Nancy

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Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% how you respond to it!

-Chuck Swindoll

Posts: 1594 | From Colorado | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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