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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Poll: Inflamation diet - did it work for you?

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Author Topic: Poll: Inflamation diet - did it work for you?
AZURE WISH
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From what i read, it seems like the anti inflamatory diet largely overlaps the anti yeast diet plus cutting out "bad" fats ..so it might be doable with my stomach now so..

I was wondering for the people that tried the anti inflamatory diet ..

5. how strictly did you follow it?

2. did it help?

3. If it helped, how much did it help?

4. If it helped, how long did it take to help?

5. Did you just change what you ate or take supplements as well?

6. If you did take supplements which ones?

thank you [group hug]

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Posts: 3860 | From nj,usa | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tif
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Haven't been on in a while and saw this..........are you referring to the nightshade elimination diet? That is the only one I am familiar with regarding pain and inflammation...........I have done this one......

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TL

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Gabrielle
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My husband and myself are 2,5 weeks into the Inflammation Diet as per Dr. K. S. We follow it religiously.

Myself, I feel soooo bad on it (completely exhausted, fatigued) that I would have given it up already if, well, if not my husband had made a completely different experience and I don't want to leave him alone in this restrictive diet.

He used to have a very high blood pressure (220/120), had to take 3 pills a day for it and still the pressure was not under control and very high.

More than 1 year ago and with abx (especially Levaquin and Moxifloxacin) he brought his BP down so that he could discontinue one pill (a beta blocker). But he still needed the other two pills to keep the BP between around 120/85 and 145/95.

4 days into the diet (now since two weeks) his BP is constantly down to between 96/60 and - rarely - at a max. of 120/80. (He still takes the two pills).

So, something is happening for him. We are in the early re-introduction phase and we hope to find out which food was causing his BP to be high.

For thim, the diet is easy as he loves fish and fruit and he can have eggs.

For myself, I think the diet is no good. As I'm intolerant to eggs and almonds and I have a fructose malabsorbance there is not much left that I can eat.

Therefore, I had to resort to brown rice and walnuts to be saturated and I think this is doing me no good.

Also, although I know this is not politically correct to say nowadays, I have to confess that I'm disgusted by fish and after a few days on it I nearly threw up by the smell of it.
[Frown]
I continued taking my supplements - don't know if this is allowed but without them I'm sure I would be even worse. I had to stop them for 3 days due to an exam and I was even more fatigued. I'm back on them since yesterday evening.

Gabrielle

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luvs2ride
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Gabrielle,

What on earth diet are you eating? Lots are vegetables are anti-inflammatory. Olive oil and fish oil are anti-inflammatory. Instead of eating fish (probably high in mercury anyway) take fish oil capsules. Nordic Naturals is a reputable brand and has no aftertaste. Here are a few foods that are exceptionally good for stopping inflammation in its tracks.

Onions-full of flavonoids and phytochemicals including quercetin. All good for inflammation.

Garlic-contains selenium and sulfur compouds that work to suppress the enzymes that cause inflammation.

Ginger-contains gingerols, powerful anti-inflammatories.

Tumeric-A study that tested an extract containing three major curcuminoids in turmeric proved to be effective in inhibiting inflammation, in fact "completely inhibiting the onset of rheum. arthritis."

Adzuki Beans - A vegan diet has been shown to be beneficial to arthritis sufferers. Adzuki beans are an excellent source of protein which is good for vegan diets. Adzuki beans contain a high amount of molybdenum, a mineral included in some liver detox formulas. Cauliflower is also rich in this mineral.

Cauliflower-In addition to containing sulfur compounds, cauliflower is an excellent source of Vit C. Vit C rich foods offer strong protection against rheumatoid arthritis.

Broccoli-Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables that contain a compound called sulforaphane may be extremely beneficial in easing arthritis pain. In one study, sulforaphane appeard to block the activity of the Cox-2 enzyme that promotes inflammation and pain. Broccoli is also a rich source of Vit C

Cherries/Cherry Juice-In addition to being rich in Vit C, cherries are rich in anthocyanins, compounds that may inhibit inflammatory enzymes.

Fresh pineapple-not canned or dried-contains bromelain, an enzyme that helps fight pain. As an added benefit, pineapple contains a lot of Vit C which can help build cartilage.

Walnuts-are a concentrated source of Omega-3 essential fatty acids, a protective fat the body cannot manufacture on its own. 1/4 cup of walnuts provides 90.8% of the daily value for these essential fats. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that consuming at least 2.3 ounces of walnuts and flaxseed daily reduces levels of C-reactive protein and other inflammatory markers.

Olive oil-increases joint mobility and relieves pain and can decrease your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. O.O. has a substance called oleocanthal that has anti-inflammatory potency similar to ibuprofen.

Cabbage-the sulfur in cabbage can help regenerate and rebuild cartilage cells as well as reduce inflammation and relieve the pain of arthritis. Cabbage contains methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) which has been shown to reduce knee pain caused by arthritis. One study showed those who took 6g MSM per day for 12 weeks report 12% less pain and 14% more knee function than those who took a placebo. Additionally, the vitamin C in cabbage is one of the nutrients most responsible for the health of collagen, a major component of cartilage.

This was taken from the Oct 08 issue of Better Nutrition.

Also check out www.drmcdougall.com. He has an entire website dedicated to healing by foods.

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When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, there will be Peace.

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luvs2ride
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Also Gabrielle,

An anti-inflammatory diet is also detoxing and you could be experiencing some fatigue and feeling bad from the detoxing you are experiencing. Stick with it for a couple of months and see how you feel then.

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When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, there will be Peace.

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luvs2ride
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As for the poll Azure, absolutely YES for me.

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When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, there will be Peace.

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Gabrielle
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Luvs,

It's the diet as per Dr. K's book: The Lyme Disease Solution

In the first week the only protein you can eat is fish. The only carb you can eat is brown rice. Of course I can eat many vegetables but I cannot live of vegetables alone. Maybe others can - I can't. Not only would I starve but I do get sick in my stomach. Don't forget that vegetables also contain fructose. A bit is okay but I cannot have much of it.

I ate lots of onions and garlic because I love it but I'm not sure that it's good for me either, because my liver cannot detox sulphur so well....

Cherries and pineapple: fructose - diarrhea! Cauliflower: only allowed after 8 weeks.
Walnuts: never liked them, but okay, I ate them anyway. Don't think they did me any good.

Beans are allowed starting the second week - they are keeping me alive right now together with lamb meat (starting to hate it).

Before the diet I had perfect stools - just absolutely perfect! Now, they are ... well, ... not nice!

I just hope it's detox but I rather think that my body doesn't get enough glucose to produce D-Ribose to make ATP. No ATP - no energy!

I'll stick with the diet but I cannot wait until Saturday when the first 4 weeks will be over and we can start to re-introduce other kinds of meat, gluten-free cereals, nightshades and cheese.

I think the diet made no sense for me because the principle is: you leave out many things, then feel better, then slowly reintroduce things and find out which foods are causing symptoms.

As I did NOT feel better but only worse and reintroducing things did not make me more worse - what can I say? As to inflammation: I had arthritis before - I still have it. No better - no worse.

I had done other elimination diets before: this is the one that makes me so miserable that I nearly prefer staying ill than feeling so bad and sick in my stomach and gut.

Anyway, my diet has been very good before. I was eating more or less all the things that are allowed in Dr. K's diet once you are over the first few months. The only bad thing that I ate was porc once in a while.

Gabrielle

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luvs2ride
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Gabrielle,

I would stick with what makes you feel better.

For me, I had an ALCAT bloodtest run to determine which foods I was allergic to. That is so much easier than an elimination diet.

It was amazing the number of "healthy" foods I had developed a sensitivity to. Of course, they were the foods I ate most often.

The vegan diet had cut out many of the offending foods and when I cut the rest out, my pain dropped significantly.

Today, I only have to avoid dairy and soy. Hopefully that will not be forever either.

Have you ever looked at the bloodtype diet? I don't follow it, but I am type A and that type is supposed to be mostly vegetarian. All my life I have felt my best when eating vegetables.

Check it out and see if the foods you feel best on line up with your bloodtype.

Susan

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When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, there will be Peace.

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Gabrielle
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Susan,

I've not done the bloodtype diet, yet. I had a food intolerance test done where it was found that I'm intolerant to eggs, almonds, pineapple and a few other, less important things.

Also, a stool test showed that I have a fructose malabsorbance, so I can eat fruit and veggies only with moderation and only after a big fat meal of meat or carbs.

I don't even know my blood type and it would cost me 60 Euro to have it determined. I think I go with my gut feeling which says: Meat is good for me. I do know that a meal with lots of carbs makes me feel bad.

In fact, I never noticed any improvement with all the different diets I have done.

Gabrielle

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listenswithcare
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I am not following the inflammation diet in the book mentioned, but I have tried to follow a diet that eliminates inflammatory foods. Like nightshades, dairy, wheat, red meat, vinegar, etc.

I feel much better when I eat low inflammation foods.

If you are having trouble with the inflammation diet in the book and your gut is not happy, I would suggest talking to your doctor about using some Ultra Inflammix from Metagenics. My body loves this stuff and I think it has worked wonders for my gut over the years. Not a cheap supplement, though.

I agree with the others. Stick with it. I went through alot of detox and diet changes before I really started to clear and feel better. It takes time if you have never done such diets before.

Robin

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luvs2ride
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Here is a very good article about food allergies/sensitivites. Note that foods you are allergic too can actually provoke endorphins response to the aggravation hence making you feel good when in fact the food is causing inflammation.

Food's connection to chronic illness should not be overlooked. It is no accident that 70% of our immune system resides in our gut.

http://www.karinya.com/alrgies.htm

QUOTE:
Strange cravings - How allergies and cravings are related: Do you crave certain foods, then feel stimulated, even euphoric when you eat them? Welcome to the adaptation stage of food allergies! Our well-designed bodies create cravings to avoid withdrawal symptoms from allergic foods. Satisfying a craving provides a high as the body rewards it with "feel good" chemicals like endorphins. Ideally, one should feel no better or worse after eating a specific food. If you do, then suspect a food sensitivity.
END QUOTE:

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When the Power of Love overcomes the Love of Power, there will be Peace.

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AZURE WISH
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Interesting.

Thank you for the specific good foods t fight inflamation luvs2ride..

my stomach isnt to a point where i can eat all of them yet but i wasnt aware about all of them... so hopefully my stomach will allow me to eat more of them ...and more often.

I am not being so restrictive just mostly everything i cant eat on anti yeast (which is alot) and then low saturated fat.

i mostly was eating poultry and still do.

I have never tried the bloodtype diet because i am also A and my stomach can only handle so many vegatables because of my gastroparesis...

plus i feel much more tired if i dont eat meat.

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Nutmeg
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I did not have much luck with the Lyme inflammation diet from Dr. S's book. I know I have a lot of inflammation, but I believe it's from toxins and infection, not from food.

I was on the Lyme inflammation diet for probably 6-8 weeks until some travel and other obligations made it impossible to continue.

I DID lose some weight, about 7 pounds, during the first two weeks. This was because I was always hungry and did not eat enough because I don't like fish, not from reduction in inflammation.

I ate very little fish, and I thought I needed to avoid eggs, so with a protein metabolism, I was very unsatisfied day and night. Drinking a lot of fruit juice and eating brown rice was not a good diet for me, so I only consumed those items in small amounts. Vegetables are filling, but don't provide long-term sustainable energy for me.

The only way I could get around the fish problem was to eat canned tuna with no additives and eat pan-seared halibut (not the other fish in the diet).

Once the halibut was cooked, I flaked it up and mixed it with cooked brown rice and a pile of steamed finely diced celery, carrots, and onions with some savory herbs. That diguised the taste and texture enough that I could eat 1-2 oz of fish, at the most, at one sitting. It wasn't enough protein, so I was always hungry.

I really hope this diet helps some folks. It's a slick idea.

Nutmeg

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Gabrielle
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Nutmeg,

We must be identical twins [Big Grin]

I'm so glad that I'm not the only failure with this diet. I started to feel guilty...

Gabrielle

Posts: 767 | From Germany | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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