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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Zinc Poisoning-or Lyme?

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Author Topic: Zinc Poisoning-or Lyme?
Wildthing
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6791

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I posted a message yesterday regarding Zinc Toxicity, and I am afraid that my post was misinterpreted.

I did not mean that Lyme leads to high levels of Zinc, as some interpreted. Sorry, I was in a hurry and may not have been clear with my message...let me try again.

The symptoms of Zinc Toxicity mimic many of the common lyme and MS symptoms.

Neurologists are now getting the word that those who wear dentures and use denture cream may be suffering from zinc toxicity--because of the zinc in the denture adhesive.

So if you wear dentures, and have lyme-do not assume that all of your symptoms are lyme related. Get your zinc and copper levels checked.

Some of the side effects or results of zinc poisoning are weakness and a loss of feeling in the hands, feet, toes, and fingers.
numbness or tingling in the arms, legs, fingers and/or toes.

Unexplained pain in these extremities
a diminished or loss of ability to move the arms, hands, legs and/or feet.

Poor balance unsteady gait or stride (ataxia)

Dysesthesias
Dysesthesias refers to unpleasant abnormal sensations that occur when a patient touches something, or is exposed to some other type of stimulus. Dysesthesias is associated with lesions of the peripheral or central nervous system, and causes patients to feel burning, wetness, itching, electric shock, "pins and needles" and other uncomfortable sensations in their extremities, especially their hands and feet.

Paresthesias
Paresthesias leads to feelings of numbness, tingling, pinching, sharp, deep stabs, electric shocks, or buzzing in the arms and legs. While the symptoms of parenthesis are similar to dysesthesias, a patient with paresthesias does not have to come in contact with a stimulus in order to experience its symptoms. Other types of paresthesias include feelings of cold, warmth, burning, itching, and skin crawling.

Copper Deficiency
Exposure to excess zinc inhibits the absorption of copper. Fatigue, paleness, skin sores, edema, slowed growth, hair loss, anorexia, diarrhea and dermatitis can be symptoms of copper deficiency. Copper deficiency can also affect the immune and cardiovascular systems. The condition also can cause reduced red blood cell function and reduced red blood cell life span, which can lead to impaired energy levels and cause weakness and labored respiration from decreased oxygen delivery.

Anemia
One of the more common blood disorders, anemia occurs when the level of healthy red blood cells in the body becomes too low. This can lead to health problems, including fatigue and impaired bodily organs, because red blood cells contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the body's tissues.

Bone Marrow Failure
Bone marrow failure syndromes include a group of disorders than can be either inherited or acquired. These diseases are disorders of the hematopoietic stem cell that can involve either one cell line or all of the cell lines (erythroid for red cells, myeloid for white blood cells, megakaryocytic for platelets).

Neuropathy
Severe zinc poisoning can lead to neuropathy, a condition that affects the nerves. Symptoms of neuropathy vary, but may include numbness or tingling in the feet, legs, hands, and/or arms; a reduction in strength or ability to move legs or feet, or arms and hands; unexplained pain in the extremities; a tendency to stumble or fall down; instability and lack of balance; or a change or decrease in walking stride. Severe neuropathy can even lead to abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, reduced ability to perspire, constipation, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction.

These neurological problems caused by excess exposure to zinc contained in denture creams can be devastating. In some cases, patients suffering from zinc poisoning have been confined to wheelchairs. Tests for zinc levels in the blood can determine quickly if a zinc overdose is to blame.

Severe zinc poisoning can lead to neuropathy, a condition that affects the nerves. Symptoms of neuropathy vary, but may include numbness or tingling in the feet, legs, hands, and/or arms; a reduction in strength or ability to move legs or feet, or arms and hands; unexplained pain in the extremities; a tendency to stumble or fall down; instability and lack of balance; or a change or decrease in walking stride. Severe neuropathy can even lead to abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, reduced ability to perspire, constipation, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction.

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Powerful Women's Motto: Live your life in such a way that When your feet hit the floor In the morning, Satan shudders & says 'Oh ****!...She's Awake!!

WildThing
www.wildthingstodo.com

Posts: 160 | From Royersford,PA,USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
DakotasMom01
LymeNet Contributor
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Thanks for the info.

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Take Care,
DakotasMom01

Posts: 371 | From NJ | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kgarrett
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so how much zinc is too much my doctor has me taking a lot.
Posts: 43 | From md | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
canefan17
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
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So moral of the story get your Copper/zinc levels checked before supplementing?
Posts: 5394 | From Houston, Tx | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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