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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Adrenal insufficiency-a good treatment?

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Author Topic: Adrenal insufficiency-a good treatment?
Marz
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From the link below, I've copied this MDs treatment for adrenal depletion.

He's sympathetic with the stress that lyme, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, etc puts on the body.

He also points out that only Addison's gets attention by most PCPs.

His prescription:

"Repletion with 15 mg of hydrocortisone on arising, 10 mg at lunch and 5 mg at bedtime is usually sufficient therapy"

He also talks about the need for testosterone. but I'm thinking a PCP might be reluctant to do that.


http://www.newswithviews.com/Howenstine/james177.htm

I'm trying some of the stress relief herbs, but they don't seem to be the answer.

Does anyone think that this is a good treatment?

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Tracy9
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Hmmmm...right now I take 5 in the a.m. and 5 in the afternoon. It is definitely not enough. LLD is waiting for me to do the saliva test.

--------------------
NO PM; CONTACT: [email protected]

13 years Lyme & Co.; Small Fiber Neuropathy; Myasthenia Gravis, Adrenal Insufficiency. On chemo for 2 1/2 years as experimental treatment for MG.

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sparkle7
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Are there side effects of the hydrocortisone, Cortef or testosterone?

This article is very good, too -
http://www.drkaslow.com/html/adrenal_insufficiency.html

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sparkle7
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Could one use these products? Are they the same as Cortef only in a different form?

http://www.salix.com/products/anusol-proctocort/index.aspx


---------

Cortef

Generic Name: hydrocortisone (oral) (hye droe KOR ti sone)
Brand Names: Cortef, Hydrocortone


What is hydrocortisone?

Hydrocortisone is in a class of drugs called steroids. Hydrocortisone prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Hydrocortisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders.

Hydrocortisone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about hydrocortisone?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to hydrocortisone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Before taking hydrocortisone, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, and about all other medicines you are using. There are many other diseases that can be affected by steroid use, and many other medicines that can interact with steroids.

Your steroid medication needs may change if you have any unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency.

Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you during treatment.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or have recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are taking hydrocortisone. Vaccines may not work as well while you are taking a steroid.

Do not stop using hydrocortisone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you are taking a steroid, in case of emergency.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking hydrocortisone?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to hydrocortisone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Other medical conditions you should tell your doctor about before taking hydrocortisone include:

liver disease (such as cirrhosis);
kidney disease;
a thyroid disorder;
diabetes;
a history of malaria;
tuberculosis;
osteoporosis;
a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;
glaucoma or cataracts;
herpes infection of the eyes;
stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis;
depression or mental illness;
congestive heart failure; or
high blood pressure

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take hydrocortisone.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Hydrocortisone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby.

Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.

----------

I thought it wasn't a good idea to take steroids with Lyme Disease.... (?)

Is there any "natural" way to boost the adrenals?

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mandy614
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rhodiola root, ginseng, DSF formula which contains bovine sources
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kreynolds
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I recently found out that I have Secondary Adrenal Insuffiency due to the Lyme.

Basically, the Lyme damaged my Pituitary Gland to the point where it is not secreting enough ACTH levels to my Adrenal Glands.

AKA, Addisons Disease. My doctor told me that if it causes further damage to the Pituitary Gland I may need surgery.

Right now the only treatment I am recieving for the Adrenal Insuffiency is Hydrocortosone.

I also have medication if I go into Adrenal Crisis....

Lyme and Co's will cause many problems and throw off most all chemical reactions in the brain.

It just keeps getting worse....

--------------------
Diagnosed CDC + 6/2007

Quest: + IGG Bands 18,23,39,41,58,66 and 93.

Quest: + IGM Bands
23,39

Quest: + Bartonella (B.Henselea & B. Quintana),+ Babesia, and + Mycoplasma and Lyme-Induced Addisons Disease

+ Biofilm blood test 12/2010

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m0joey
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I've spoken with many top CFS docs in the country who say hyrocortisone should only be used short-term so they dont suppress natural production. The preferred naturopathic approach (enhance innate production vs. replacement dosing) is glandulars and adaptogens. If you can, get some type of energetic testing to determine what type of adaptogen is best for you. I personally use WTSmed, but everyone's sensitivities and needs differ.

If you know your cortisol curve is essentially flat, i wouldnt worry so much about dosing as taking the maximum dose listed on the bottle, morning and around 1-2 pm.

the adrenals and thyroid go hand in hand. supplement thyroid with iodine (lugol's, magnascent, iodoral--i use magnascent) but with this u need to be careful with dosing. If you ramp up too fast ur heart will race, you'l feel overanxious, and not be able to sleep.

neuroscience neuroadrenal profile is very good for monitoring hormones and neurotransmitters as u progress... thyroid go with standard quest/labcorp

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by sparkle7:
[QB] Are there side effects of the hydrocortisone, Cortef or testosterone?

It's hard on my stomach after so many years of taking it. I only take 10mg per day. (cortef)

I find good energy with the testosterone.... no side effects at proper dosage.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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katieb
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I was going to take cortef until my natro doctor gave me an adrenal support and it turned my life around. I went from being tired from the time that I got up unitl I went to bed.

I noticed a big difference the first time I took the pills. the brand is Vital Nutrients, adrenal support.

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Abxnomore
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I've always used alternative methods. I've never used hydrocortisone or any meds.

I agree with m0joey that neuro science is the best lab for adrenals and neurotransmitter testing and they have their own pharmaceutical grade line of targeted nutrients to correct what the testing shows.

Everything has to be in balance for the body to function optimally, thyroid, adrenals, hormones, etc. I take testosterone as well and have never had any problems. I've used many of the neuro science supplements with good results.

The most important thing is to get a picture (graph) of what your adrenal cycle and rhythm is. Only then can you begin to treat it properly.

I much prefer to use supplements then medications.

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Marz
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I'm wondering if the hydrocortisone cream in Sparkle's link would have the same bad effect. Does that just make it easier on the liver?

Just reading about side effects, especially insomnia is changing my mind about asking for it.

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Lymeorsomething
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I ran about 20 mgs of Cortef for three months and it did next to nothing. It's worth a try but going beyond safe thresholds is not a good idea as you can shut down normal production.

Dr. William Mck. Jeffries, in the Safe Uses of Cortisol, advocated 20mgs tops generally for safe physiologic dosing...

You can always try glandulars and Isocort as a beginning trial...

If you're deficient in T and are male, check the pituitary hormones lh/fsh first before adding T...there are better options sometimes...

If you're female, just do the cream thing or whatever [Smile]

--------------------
"Whatever can go wrong will go wrong."

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cactus
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I have Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency) due to Lyme.

I take 15 mg hydrocortisone and .1 mg fludrocortisone in the morning.

Another 5 mg hydrocortisone around noon.

After treating Lyme and co for many years - I thought I'd always have to live with the fatigue, inability to concentrate, tingling hands and feet. And lots more.

But the hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone has changed my world.

Have been off Lyme and TBD treatment since Feb - and doing exceptionally well.

Ok - a few, ummm, minor hiccups in the form of C. Diff - but aside from the GI stuff... Doing really well.

Finding out about and adequately treating Addison's Disease has made a huge difference in day-to-day life.

Found mine through saliva testing, and followed up with further testing.

If you have it - I hope you find a treatment that works for you, whichever path you choose.

Wishing you wellness.

--------------------
Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again? - A.A. Milne

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kreynolds
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cactus:

I am taking 20mg of Hydrocortosone in the Am and PM.

If you don't mind me asking how long did it take before you noticed an improvement with the symptoms?

I have been on it for almost 2 months now and have not noticed any changes.

Did you get rid of the Lyme and TBD before treating the Addisons Disease?

Sorry about all the questions just new to the Addisons and still battling Lyme and a laundry list of Co's...

Thanks!

--------------------
Diagnosed CDC + 6/2007

Quest: + IGG Bands 18,23,39,41,58,66 and 93.

Quest: + IGM Bands
23,39

Quest: + Bartonella (B.Henselea & B. Quintana),+ Babesia, and + Mycoplasma and Lyme-Induced Addisons Disease

+ Biofilm blood test 12/2010

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cactus
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K, I started off at a lower dose of hydrocortisone - I think it was 10 mg in the morning - and did that for several months.

Saw some *small* improvements, but nothing significant.

A bout of pancreatitis landed me in an Addisonian crisis - and strangely, I am grateful because it is what prompted LLMD to increase the doses and add fludrocortisone.

It was when we increased it to 15 in the am & 5 at noon, and added the fludrocortisone that things really began to turn for the better.

I think the fludrocortisone was the kicker.

Whether I've gotten rid of Lyme and TBDs is of course debatable, but for now - I feel good.

Started treating Lyme and co in 2005, and at the time I had quite the toxic tick soup, among other things (chronic salmonella and legionella, for two).

4 years into treatment - and I was not giving up, but was fearful that I had hit the end of what Lyme and TBD treatment could do for me.

Having Addison's and not knowing may have muddied the waters a bit, with regard to Lyme and Co treatment - I wonder now which symptoms are from which disease?

Basically, I think that toward the end, I kept thinking that all symptoms were attributable to Lyme and Co, when in fact, they may have been Addison's.

My guess is that treating your Addison's adequately will help with your Lyme treatment - I think it will help you heal, and also help you see when you are making progress knocking down infections.

There is an Addison's Disease forum, I don't have the link at the moment, but if you'd like will pm it to you tomorrow. Reading it has been fairly helpful.

Don't hesitate with any questions... You're welcome to pm me as well.

--------------------
Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again? - A.A. Milne

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Lymeorsomething
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I believe Marz was asking about adrenal fatigue not Addisons Disease... It is risky to treat the former with more than 20 mgs of cortisol because you can shut down your natural cortisol production and end up with a much bigger problem which would require permanent cortisol replacement...

If you suspect adrenal fatigue, cortisol is a worthwhile experiment but only at physiologic doses and it is advisable to start low and slow...or to use glandulars, supportive herbs, or Isocort as a starting point...

--------------------
"Whatever can go wrong will go wrong."

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Lymeorsomething
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katieb, it's good to see another milfordite on the board [Smile]

--------------------
"Whatever can go wrong will go wrong."

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sparkle7
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Thanks for the info, everyone. What have been your symptoms of adrenal insufficiency or Addison's?

I always read that you are not supposed to take steroids when you have Lyme. I prefer to treat with natural products - so, it seems the better choice. I'm not against drugs but I'd rather try the natural solutions first.

I'm not sure if this is my issue. I'm going to check into it further.

My main symptom is increased pain in the am. I also feel very tired but it could also be due to other things. I think I have a hard time getting out of bed due to pain rather than fatigue. If I wasn't in so much pain, waking up wouldn't be so difficult.

Is this a symptom of adrenal insufficiency? I didn't read that pain was a problem as much as fatigue & low blood pressure.

-----

The symptoms of adrenal insufficiency usually begin gradually.

Characteristics of the disease are

chronic, worsening fatigue
muscle weakness
loss of appetite
weight loss

About 50 percent of the time, one will notice

nausea
vomiting
diarrhea

Other symptoms include

low blood pressure that falls further when standing, causing

dizziness or fainting

skin changes in Addison's disease, with areas of
hyperpigmentation, or dark tanning, covering exposed and nonexposed parts of the body; this darkening of the skin is most visible on scars; skin folds; pressure points such as the elbows, knees, knuckles, and toes; lips; and mucous membranes

--------

I don't really have any of these symptoms except fatigue... Just curious if there are other symptoms that people are experiencing.

Seems like the same ingredient as Cortef is in Anusol to treat hemorrhoids only the Anusol is a suppository. I find that interesting...

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Lymeorsomething
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Adrenal fatigue symptoms overlap other issues. It's better to just run tests. Some like saliva. Others like the 24 hr urine test. If those tests show something weird then there are more sensitive follow up tests....

--------------------
"Whatever can go wrong will go wrong."

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sparkle7
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I've read that the tests aren't always that accurate & sometimes these things can be what is known as "sub-clinical".

I'm just curious about what the symptoms might be before trying to correct the problem with supplements. I'm not too keen on a drug for it at the moment.

I might be more a low thyroid person, than low adrenal... I did do bio-identical thyroid & my doctor seemed to think it helped due to tests. He said I didn't have to take it at the time I last saw him. I didn't feel much of a difference either way.

There is a connection with the liver in adrenal function. I'm working of some issues with my liver - so, I don't want to over-do it with too many supplements, drugs, etc.

When my liver is better - it may help my adrenals, too.

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cactus
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quote:
Originally posted by Lymeorsomething:
I believe Marz was asking about adrenal fatigue not Addisons Disease...

If I misunderstood the question and muddied the waters by addressing adrenal insufficiency rather than fatigue, I am sorry for that.

It could be that I misunderstood based on the title of the thread ("adrenal insufficiency - a good treatment") - but despite the title, Marz may have been asking more about adrenal fatigue.

To be sure there are no misunderstandings - I have adrenal insufficiency, also known as Addison's Disease.

It is a more extreme form of adrenal fatigue, and the two are not the same.

Marz, if you are exploring your options here, more testing would be appropriate.

It is also very important to move slowly with hydrocortisone etc, because taking more than a physiologic dose is not good.

As for the concerns about steroids and Lyme - it is a catch 22 - and one that may have more solutions than hydrocortisone, especially if one is dealing with adrenal fatigue.

There are many options for supporting the adrenals naturally.

I think Bejoy has posted many times on the topic - searching for her past posts might lend some good info.

For those of us with complete adrenal insufficiency, some supplementation is a necessity, in my imperfect understanding.

The key is to find the right dose - only the amount that one's body would be producing naturally. That takes patience and moving slowly.

For me only - I wish that I had explored the adrenal issue earlier in treatment, because the result of adequately treating it has been that I am considerably more functional.

Loosely - Lyme and Co treatment got me to about 65% functional, and I stalled out. Treating the adrenal issue brought me to 90%.

Not saying that will happen for anyone else, but it is certainly an option worth exploring through testing.

--------------------
Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again? - A.A. Milne

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Marz
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So much good info here! Thanks all.

I'd sure like to have a positive test before taking a steroid. I'm not seeing my LLMD now, and doubt my PCP would test.

I'm going to check into getting Vital Nutrients adrenal support KatieB.

I have all of the characteristics that Sparkle lists.

But the thing that is really hard to deal with is waking after about 3 hours of sleep (have to take half an ambien to fall asleep cuz never sleepy even though tired)

I wake up with heart pounding and headache, take another half ambien and sleep longer then, but again wake up with the heart pounding and back of head pressure/headache.

Because of all the stress I've been through in past few months,I'm attributing it to adrenals. I'm not on antibiotics now.

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sparkle7
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It's best not to wait until this becomes a critical issue. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure...

There are a number of good things you can use to support adrenal function. I think I read vitamin C is helpful. I think the herb Astragalus is good, too.

I'm also looking into the products mentioned. It's all very helpful to know this. Thanks!

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kreynolds
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I agree with Cactus,I am another victim of Lyme causing Addisons Disease.

In my opinion I think all Lyme patients should be tested for adrenal insuffiency.

I was in the hospital for 18 days in April and I am glad I was because that is what they had found.

Like cactus had mentioned a lot of the symptoms "overlap" with Lyme/TBD and Addisons Disease.

All you need is a simple saliva test from Nuero Science....

--------------------
Diagnosed CDC + 6/2007

Quest: + IGG Bands 18,23,39,41,58,66 and 93.

Quest: + IGM Bands
23,39

Quest: + Bartonella (B.Henselea & B. Quintana),+ Babesia, and + Mycoplasma and Lyme-Induced Addisons Disease

+ Biofilm blood test 12/2010

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m0joey
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I don't know about addison's, but my cortisol curve from 2 months ago was flat. How MDs can't have the insight to draw a flat line using am/pm cortisol production and compare it with healthy cortisol production (morning high evening low) is beyond me. Live and die by "normal reference range." Except most of us won't die from it.. we'll just be extremely dysfuntional and tired all the time.

Even after treating adrenals with bioidentical DHEA, pregnenolone, glandulars, phytocort, cortef, armour for the last year, as of two months ago my curve was still flat. It was then that I realized I need to address this issue in a much more targeted way instead of laying out bait that the adrenals may or may not bite.

THere is a very big difference between adrenal insufficiency and addison's. With addison's, your ACTH response is flat. With AI, your response should be perfectly normal. The problem isn't that your adrenal doesn't know how to function... it's been overworked due to an upregulated and chronic stress response, so now it's done run out of fumes. Help the adrenals adapt to stress (adaptogen) & buttress natural production (glandulars). Do not mess with the adrenals. This may be one of the biggest missed keys to recovering from fatigue

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cactus
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If anyone is interested in finding more info, here's a link on Adrenal Insufficiency and/or Addison's Disease. There are obviously many more:

http://tinyurl.com/w86bf

Quote:
"Addison's disease occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce enough of the hormone cortisol and, in some cases, the hormone aldosterone. The disease is also called adrenal insufficiency, or hypocortisolism."

My LLMD and endocrinologist have used the terms "adrenal insufficiency" interchangeably with Addison's, but not with "adrenal fatigue."

Whatever it's called, I hope all of us find answers and wellness.

--------------------
Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again? - A.A. Milne

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sparkle7
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FYI - (note: interesting about salt!)

Adrenal Dysfunction

The adrenal glands are small but very powerful glands that sit atop each of your kidneys located in the middle of your back. They are really two separate organs combined into one location - the outer portion acalled the adrenal cortex and the inner portion called the adrenal medulla. The focus of this text is on the adrenal cortex.

The cortex serves primarily a hormonal function - among the main functions of the adrenal cortex are the regulation of the mineral metabolism (sodium, potassium, chloride), water balance, metabolism (utilization and distribution of carbohydrates, protein, and fat), allergic and immune reactions (such as hypersensitivity, allergies, and autoimmune diseases), and production of the male and female hormones (progesterone, testosterone, estrogens, DHEA, etc.).

Some of the signs of adrenal insufficiency are often similar to those found in persons who are hypoglycemic. These chief complaints listed in order of prominence are:

Inability to concentrate
Excessive fatigue
Nervousness & irritability
Mental depression
Apprehensions
Excessive weakness
Lightheadedness
Faintness and fainting
Insomnia

Patients with low adrenal cortex function may have hypoglycemia (or disturbed carbohydrate metabolism) although not all hypoglycemic patients have low adrenal function.

A low flat glucose tolerance curve obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test suggests hypoadrenocorticism but can also reflect reactive hypoglycemia, some form of allergy, gouty or rheumatoid arthritis, or schizophrenia.

When patients receive support for their adrenal cortex (such as with Adrenal Cortex Extract injections), they often report improvements in arthritis, pain in shoulders and back muscles, allergies, premenstrual problems, headache, migraine, ringing of the ears, tension, depression, suicidal thoughts, nervousness, apprehensions, noticeable heart action (palpitations), gastrointestinal problems, heat exhaustion, and an inability in handling stress.

The following physical findings suggest low adrenal function.

Skin thin and dry or scaly, pigmentation of temples, red palms or fingertips, and cold clammy palms.

Deep Tendon Reflexes are exaggerated.

Lymph Gland inflammation of the neck (swelling, pain, or tenderness).

Blood Pressure is usually low, and drops upon standing (105/60) and then elevated to (120 or 130/70 or 80) on reclining (postural or orthostatic hypotension). This change from low to higher when lying down may be the reason why many patients find it difficult to fall asleep. It is conducive to falling asleep to lie in a semi-reclining position for 15 or 20 minutes.

Another way to describe postural hypotension is that there may be a sudden drop in blood pressure to below normal upon suddenly arising from bed, or from standing still, causing temporary darkening of vision, dizziness, light-headedness, faintness, or fainting.

Body Conformation is of the thin muscle-type (this is called asthenic habitus). The typical person is also tall with an angular appearance but a shorter person may have what we call "signs of tallness" - a moderately long neck, an index finger longer than the 4th (ring) finger, and a 2nd toe longer than the big toe.

There are long arms and legs, and the arm span is greater than the height.

Hair is sparse on the body but there is usually a full head of fine and abundant hair. The typical person is blond and blue eyed, or red headed. A tall, thin blonde with skin allergies can be diagnosed immediately.

Dentition shows crowded lower teeth with a high palatal arch (roof of mouth).

Pain and tenderness over adrenal area of mid-back when pressure is applied (called Rogoff's sign).

Urination is either very frequent in small amounts or infrequent in large amounts. This person usually does not do well in the heat or in the summer, particularly in conditions of high temperature, high humidity, and low barometric pressure.

Scanty perspiration (except under arms or hands and feet). This person may be a "salt loser" (the tendency is to lose salt and to retain potassium).

The urine and perspiration of the salt loser is saltier than normal and there is consequently a greater salt concentration on the skin. Animals are attracted to the salt on the skin, and often the low adrenal patient will be a favorite of animals to lick.

Ankle and/or Finger Swelling. John Tintera, M.D. was an early pioneer in recognizing and treating adrenal insufficiency.

He wrote that salt is a diuretic and that hypoadrenocortics (patients with low adrenal cortex function) retain fluid because the body is trying to hold onto the salt.

When enough salt is consumed, the body takes what it needs and excretes the rest. If the ankle edema is due to insufficient salt, the edema will usually disappear in three days after taking adequate salt.

If it does not disappear in five to six days, potassium may also be needed. Vitamin B6 is also helpful for edema not only because it has a diuretic effect but also supports the adrenal cortex.


The Importance of Salt

For the person with depleted adrenals sunbathing on the beach can have devastating results. The salt loser that attempts to function on low salt does not understand why he feels faint, or is suddenly unable to function in the heat, or he feels his mind is cloudy and his energy gone.

He may become very weak, tired, and depressed. Salt is needed for the electrical function of the heartbeat, to make hydrochloric acid in the stomach, and for the fluid around the cells.

Sodium is the principal fluid outside of the cell (extra-cellular fluid) and as a result affects the proper function of all cells. The nerve cells of the brain, and consequently all of our emotions, are affected by the salt levels.

Adding enough sodium chloride (salt) to the diet may be all that is needed for some patients.

Even other types of conditions, like kidney disease, need "some" salt and should have a moderate amount. According to Richard H. Ahrens, Ph.D. of the USDA and an Associate Professor of Nutrition at the University of Maryland, salt use does not cause hypertension as is frequently claimed.

There should be no salt restrictions during pregnancy and no diuretic use.

If there is edema in pregnancy, extra salt brings about diuresis. It can be a serious mistake for an individual to avoid salt for no apparent reason.

For any loss of body fluids - excessive perspiration or urination, vomiting or diarrhea - the lost salt must be replaced.

A person with undiagnosed adrenal dysfunction (who is therefore a salt loser) on a salt restricted diet may be slowly deteriorating as the result.

There appears to be no food that naturally contains more sodium than potassium and therefore salt must be added to the diet. This is why Gandhi led the revolution in India.

Salt is essential to life. In Addison's Disease, where there is a complete non-function (atrophy) of the adrenal cortex, patient's can suffer from prostration, die from excess perspiration or a diet high in potassium or low in sodium.

To find the amount of salt you need, gradually increase your salt intake until you find the amount you feel best on - usually 2 to 10 grams or roughly 1/2 teaspoonful to 1 tablespoonful.

After determining the amount, try to cut back and see if that is just as effective. The addition of a small amount of sugar actually helps you absorb salt.

In fact this is the basis for many popular electrolyte replacement products like Gatorade . Some individuals may also need potassium.

Some may suggest using sea salt, but in the larger amounts that hypoadrenocortics need, you may overdose on trace minerals.

The name trace minerals means one needs only a trace amount. The main minerals and electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, iodine, and zinc are needed in larger amounts on a regular basis.

Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt is plain sodium chloride without additives. When dissolved in water, it results in a clear solution indicating no additives.

Adrenal Steroids

The adrenals have a close connection with the sex glands, the ovaries and testes. The adrenal cortex produces about 25% of the estrogenic hormones in women and 65% of the androgenic hormones in the man.

The inability of the adrenals to produce the additional sex hormones may result in the flat chested female or the sparse chest-haired male.

In patients in their thirties or older may also have an absence of hair on the lower two-thirds of the legs, which is not due to being worn off by the trousers as is supposed.

There can be a great variation possible among the large numbers of adrenal steroids, causing a person's individual physical characteristics to vary widely from the typical.

These variations may bring on precocious sexual development in boys and girls. They also cause changes in adults in psychological makeup and direction of sexual desire, or can actually produce feminism in men and masculinity in women.

This of course does not have anything to do with sexual orientation.

Hypoadrenocorticism rarely exists without involvement of other glands and organs. The liver must detoxify each and every substance in the body.

This includes not only medications and drugs, but also hormones produced by your own body. Thus the effectiveness of the adrenal in part depends on the efficiency of the liver.

The laboratory tests commonly called "liver function tests" in fact do not tell how the liver is functioning but rather only tell if the liver is inflamed or injured.

Stress and the Adrenals

It is absolutely necessary to remove the dietary stress, sugars, excess or processed starches, caffeine, alcohol, stimulant drugs, and as much nicotine as possible.

To rejuvenate the adrenal cortex extra vitamin C, salt, and fat - both saturated and unsaturated is needed. Avoiding animal fats, as seems to be the popular thing to do, is avoiding the kind of fat adrenal hormones, estrogens and androgens are made from.

The adrenals contain more vitamin C and cholesterol than any tissue in the body. Avoid or reduce excessive heat, cold, overwork, lack of sleep, arguments, diseases, and the like.

Oxygen is necessary for the utilization of glucose by the body, and proper breathing must be practiced. Rest periods and relaxation is necessary with a bedtime no later than 11 p.m.

A discussion on stress should include recognition of Dr. Hans Selye. His classic work on stress (The Stress of Life, McGraw- Hill Book Co., N.Y.) and his many other publications report "that our various internal organs, especially the endocrine glands and the nervous system, help to adjust us to the constant changes which occur in and around us.

He calls this adjustment the General Adaptation Syndrome. Selye concluded that the adrenals were the body's prime reactors to stress.

He stated that the adrenals "...are the only organs that do not shrink under stress; they thrive and enlarge. If you remove them, and subject an animal to stress it can't live.

But if you remove them, and then inject extract of cattle adrenals (cortex), stress resistance will vary in direct proportion to the amount of the injection, and even be put back to normal."

Likewise a person's stress resistance will vary with the competence of his adrenals, but continually stressing the adrenals finally depletes them.

As with all chronic conditions, there are three things that must be addressed in order to be successful:

Give the body the nourishment it needs to heal itself. In this case, vitamins C, B5, and B6, salt, and select minerals are often required. More specific nutritional support is usually necessary at least in the initial treatment phase.

Avoid those things or activities that will make you worse. Stress, sugar, and caffeine top the list.

Detoxify or de-infect something that needs to be removed from the body in order to heal. Hypoglycemia, as is the case in many patients, often is associated with yeast overgrowth from excess sugar intake.

Successful management of adrenal conditions is among the most satisfying result a doctor will see. I have had alot of experience in helping people rejuvenate themselves through hormonal balancing.

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sparkle7
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FYI -

http://www.medhunters.com/articles/creepyCrawlyTherapies.html

Georgetown University in Washington, DC is currently engaged in a Phase I "Study of the Safety of Honeybee Venom Extract in Patients with Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis."

One possible reason for bee venom?s effectiveness could be its most prevalent ingredient, melittin. AAS reports that melittin stimulates the pituitary gland to release ACTH, which in turn stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisol.

Melittin, when tested in rats with arthritis, was 100 times more potent as an anti-inflammatory agent than hydrocortisol.

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sparkle7
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FYI -

http://www.appliedhealth.com/nutri/page8380.php

Licorice extracts demonstrate action on the adrenal cortex
Licorice extracts Glycyrrhetinic Acid and CS have an aldosterone effect on the body, causing plasma retention of sodium ions and plasma depletion of potassium ions.

This effect is achieved via a two-fold action of licorice products: first, they stimulate the adrenal cortex directly to produce mineral corticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal sex hormones; and second, they prevent degradation of these hormones by the liver and kidneys. The end result is a continuous and prolonged activation of the corticoids.

A possible mode of action is suggested by an in vitro study in rat liver, which demonstrated that Glycyrrhetinic Acid and its derivatives inhibit 5 beta-reduction to a much greater extent than 5 alpha-reduction.

When Glycyrrhetinic Acid or GL were administered, 5 beta-reductase activity was significantly suppressed. On the contrary, 5 alpha-reductase was markedly increased, though its mechanism needs clarification.

In human beings, 5 beta-reductase is quantitatively the major enzyme and plays an important role in the regulation of cortisol and aldosterone metabolism.

Thus it can be presumed the suppression of 5 beta-reductase activity by Glycyrrhetinic Acid or GL administration may delay the clearance of corticosteroids and prolong the biological half-life of cortisol, resulting in the synergism of these steroids and Glycyrrhetinic Acid and GL.

In one study, GL's potentiation and prolongation of hydrocortisone treatment was observed in patients with acute rheumatic fever and lupus erythematosus disseminatus. GL caused increased excretion of free and decreased excretion of conjugated 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS), with a total decrease of steroid excretion.

It tended to cause a fall in eosinophil counts. In vitro studies showed GL inhibits the metabolism of corticoids, while Glycyrrhetinic Acid is less effective.

Glycyrrhetinic Acid inhibits the antigranulomatous property of cortisone, without affecting its anti-inflammatory ability.

Glycyrrhetinic Acid stimulates the immunosuppressive property of cortisone, while exhibiting an immunosuppressive action of its own. Through the years, licorice has often been compared to glucocorticoids and said to mimic them in action.

However, licorice root differs from the glucocorticoids in several ways: it is antagonistic against a variety of physiological actions of glucocorticoids, such as antigranulomatous action, glycogen depositing effect in the liver, accelerating effect on cholesterol synthesis in the liver, atrophic action on thymus, suppressive effect on ACTH biosynthesis and its secretion; and it increases suppressive effect on antibody production and on stress reaction of glucocorticoids.

Finally, as mentioned elsewhere, it is (as SNMC) effective even on steroid-ineffective chronic active hepatitis. It accelerates the reduction of hepatitis Bs antigen titer, disappearance of HBe antigen, and appearance of antiHBe.

Licorice components exert a positive effect on the course of Addison's disease. There is evidence such an effect depends on the presence of a small amount glucocorticoid.

If the disease has advanced to the stage of complete adrenal exhaustion, licorice will be beneficial only if exogenous cortisone is also present.

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Abxnomore
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I used licorice with good results for many years for adrenal support. However, it is contraindicated for those who have elevated blood pressure issues. Perhaps it was in the article and I over looked it. Only deglycerized licorice can be used for patients with elevated blood pressure but it does not work for adrenal issues.

I have tried many things thru the years isocort, and many different adrenal formulas, gladulars before prion diseases came on the scene, siberian ginseng but I now find that AdreCor by

Neuro Science works the best. It is a very complete targeted supplement that is prescribed based on your testing results. Other of their supplement line may be prescribed based on your results, which I have taken depending what my cortisol levels were doing.

I've been on adrenal support for many years before I discovered I had lyme. There were times when they burned out, recovered and then my cortisol levels went thru the roof again only to burn out again.

Now things are steady and I honestly believe due to lyme it will be an issue I will deal with for the rest of my life. AdreCor seems to keep things stable, by supporting my adrenals, plus it includles Rhodiolia which is a wonderful adaptogen.

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m0joey
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the only thing about adrecor is it's only an adaptogen. For my flat cortisol curve, they should've recommended a glandular on top of that. Plus, not everyone utilizes the same type of adaptogen the same way. This is where I believe muscle-testing, ART etc can be very helpful. My practitioner tested 4 different types of adaptogens for me. Only one, the one I"m on now, tested well for me.
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Abxnomore
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Mine was flat also at one point but it worked well for me plus I take many other nutrients prescribed by my alternative doc and at the time neuro science recommended a few of their other targeted supplements. I'm also addressing thyroid, hormones and neurotransmitters.

I haven't done glandulars in about 15 years. My alternative doc stays away from them because of prion diseases but I have used them in the past. I seem to be doing fine without them.

But you are right,there cannot be a cookie cutter approach for adrenal issues and they must be monitored frequently by a practitioner that knows what he/she is doing.

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Lymeorsomething
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The supplement suggestions are appreciated. I may try some of these as I'm not overly interested in becoming slave to long-term cortisol replacement, which may just complicate the picture further...

It's good for some bad for others (like everything else it seems)....

--------------------
"Whatever can go wrong will go wrong."

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jl123
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I find it strange that I never read anything on lymenet that talks about traditional Chinese medicine.

Sure I read about the usual suspects like Ginseng, or Sarsaparilla, or licorice but what of the multi-thousand year combination's that have been tested over thousands of years with studies to back these treatments up.

A far more well understood and scientifically substantiated herbal remedy for adrenal function is
Liu Wei Di Huang Wan. Its strange how this is the most popular and TCM medicine in all of China- literally 100's of millions of Chinese use it and yet no one on here has ever mentioned it. We all have more homework to do. JL

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m0joey
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i was waiting for the kicker JL. Thanks for mentioning it haha
Posts: 713 | From Los Angeles | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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