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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » why are there ticks in sand when they hate hot and dry?

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Author Topic: why are there ticks in sand when they hate hot and dry?
lpkayak
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iraq? arizona?

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
JamesNYC
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Who says they are? And AZ has forests and trees too, it isn't all desert.
Posts: 872 | From New York City | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sutherngrl
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There are ticks on the beach! You can't escape them.
Posts: 4035 | From Mississippi | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
22dreams
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There are ticks on CITY beaches too!
Posts: 571 | From Massachusetts | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
glm1111
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I met a woman while waiting for a cab in front of a hospital. She said her son got bitten inside a Casino in Atlantic City. She thinks the tick was in the carpet,

Gael

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PARASITES/WORMS ARE NOW
RECOGNIZED AS THE NUMBER 1 CO-INFECTION IN LYME DISEASE BY ILADS*

Posts: 6418 | From philadelphia pa | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pryorka
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I saw a tick on a beach in malibu once, that was before I had lyme but it made me really paranoid. I had no idea they could live there until I saw that.
Posts: 499 | From Indiana | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
wtl
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Just to make you all more scared, according to Stephen Harrod Buhner, a well known and respected naturalist who has written a book titled Healing Lyme, he thinks that since Bb can survive in urine and fecal matters for prolonged period of time, the earth is now covered with the bateria. You don't have to get bitten by a tick to be sick.

I don't know what to think anymore...

Posts: 822 | From midwest | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
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i'm pretty sure they are on beaches-long island and ct for sure...

i was on an island in the hudson once (ny) and i let the dogs out to pee...in 30 seconds they were crawling with ticks...thank god i had spray with me-i put them in car and sprayed them and the car and swept the dead ticks out

i think in cure unknown pam talks about ticks being on grass or weeds near a city apt...if it wasn't her its in one of the other lyme books

they put permethrin on the uniforms the guys wore in the gulf wars and gave them deet for their skin for ticks

i still don't understand how they can survive hot dry sand...

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sutherngrl
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They have adapted! Or who knows, maybe the spirochete doesn't need the tick anymore.
Posts: 4035 | From Mississippi | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Blackstone
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Lets not overreact. There are ticks in many grassy environments. Forests, sure. Deserts? I'm sure a single organism could be tracked anywhere, but as a species I wouldn't think they have the mobility (ie they don't jump or fly) to exist in the desert. They need brush in order to climb up and find a host.

Neither the LLMDs I speak with patients spoken with myself in person have ever heard of someone getting infected in a desert environment. Now, its completely possible they picked it up from a forest or brush filled area, turf put down and the like, but from never from sand itself.

Many LLMDs and others, including myself, disagree with Buhner in that respect. If it was so easy to find active lyme in waste, we'd have an easy form of diagnosis. Its even more unlikely that waste transmission would be possible.

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sutherngrl
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I know people that live directly on the beach/ocean, that never left that area and were bitten by ticks and infected with LD. There is brush and such on beaches so maybe that explains it.

LD has begun to flourish in states such as AL, LA, MS, FL, GA, etc. All southern states that are very hot and all have beaches. Like I said before, I think the ticks have adapted to all environments. Even the dessert.

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Melanie Reber
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Aren't we forgetting that we are not the only hosts here? ANYWHERE an animal can travel... so can a hitchhiker tick.

Bb has been found in African sand. Many other diseases are being carried by sand fleas, flies, etc.

A huge pathway for dispersal of diseased ticks is to hang a ride on birds that migrate along our coastlines.

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5dana8
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that's a really good question lpkayak. i'm not exactly sure but do know they can go along time without water & can survive incredible tempertures.

Birds drop them & also small mice too can deposite them too, so ticks can turn up anywhere ...

a friend of minre once got bite by a tick on the beach in CT and had to have treatment [Frown]

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5dana8

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DeniseNM
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I live in the desert, my whole yard is sand/rocks with a few weeds (I'm working on it), and I have to constantly get ticks off my dogs and douse them with poison.

Didn't I also read that they're finding Bb, etc., in deer flies and mosquitos? I would imagine that anything that carries blood around can carry these little boogies.

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dx: MS in 1998
2007 - Lyme suspected
2009 - Positive Lyme, MS worse. Now: Copaxone shots for MS
gall bladder out 7/09
Ceftin, Zith, Septra
LDN
Acyclovir
Monolaurin, DHEA, Pregnonelon, Curcumin

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lpkayak
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i googles iraq and lyme and this popped up:

The defeat of Saddam Hussein in the 1991 Gulf War was followed by the drawing up, by the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM) of a list of microbes to be monitored in Iraq. Among them - the borrelia genus in general, and Borrelia burgdorferi in particular. [xli] UNSCOM also included organisms such as ehrlichia and babesia, which are often present in Lyme-infected ticks, and are acquired as concurrent illnesses when a person is bitten.
There are other organisms on the UN list not generally associated, in the public mind, with biowarfare, and it could be argued that the UN was simply being extra cautious by casting a wide net. However, whether Lyme bacteria were present in Iraq at that time or not, they certainly are today, and US Army manuals warn soldiers to protect themselves from the disease [xlii] If we are to accept the traditional Steerite explanation for the rise of Lyme - that it is a natural consequence of a recent population explosion of deer due to reforestation, combined suburbanisation, bringing humans into contact with forests - then the presence of Lyme in the dusty sand dunes of Iraq seems perverse.

ACTUALLY-THEY DON'T SAY ANY THING ABOUT TICKS...JUST Bb and other co's. i wonder if there is any truth to it.

some where else i read they put permethrin on uniforms and deet on skin of soldiers there

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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