LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Secrets Of Ulcer-causing Bacteria

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Secrets Of Ulcer-causing Bacteria
JRWagner
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 3229

Icon 1 posted      Profile for JRWagner     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
FYI...this bacteria is also a spirochete...just like BB...

Clever Biochemical Strategy Enables Bacteria To Move Freely And Colonize Host


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090812163805.htm

Posts: 1414 | From Ny, Ny | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TxLymie
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 20847

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TxLymie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have this as well. Found out I had a stomach ulcer from H. Pylori one day and the next day I found out I had Lyme. Are the 2 linked?

I keep wondering if HP is giving me a false positive Lyme test. I don't feel as bad as most Lyme sufferers.

--------------------
TxLymie
IgG-Negative
IgM - Postive bands 23 and 41

Other dx: 2000: Endometriosis 2009: Chronic EBV, Mycoplasma infection, HHV6, H.pylori

Posts: 297 | From Houston | Registered: Jun 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Abxnomore
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 18936

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Abxnomore     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Lyme puts you at risk to acquire many things.

If you have low stomach acid, it gives H. Pylori and many pathogens a chance to settle in. Our stomach acid is supposed to kick these critters out of our systems.

H. Pylori can be very resistant to treat but it's hardly a new idea. Many people who have lyme have H. pylori as well.

Posts: 5187 | From Lyme Zone | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Amy C
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 19297

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Amy C     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That is very interesting!! My son had an ulcer when he was 12. Now my other son is 10 and having a lot of stomach problems that might be an ulcer.

--------------------
My lyme disease blog:
http://lymetimes3.blogspot.com/
One BIG Lyme family!
I tested CDC + 10/08
My mom Igenex + 11/08 & My brother Igenex + 4/09, My 2 boys some + & IND bands, clinical diagnosis 3/09 (youngest has Aspergers too)

Posts: 470 | From Painesville, Ohio | Registered: Mar 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treepatrol
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 4117

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treepatrol     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070522091147.htm
JR check out the salt connection makes H pylori Salt Increases Ulcer-bug Virulence
ScienceDaily (May 24, 2007) -- Scientists have identified yet another risk from a high-salt diet. High concentrations of salt in the stomach appear to induce gene activity in the ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori, making it more virulent and increasing the likelihood of an infected person developing a severe gastric disease
so much for salt? C

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
JRWagner
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 3229

Icon 1 posted      Profile for JRWagner     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Abx...of course it is not a new idea, but the MECHANISM is. Look deeper...BB might also use similar mechanisms to burrow deeper into our soft tissues and CNS.

Stomach acid does NOT kill H-Pylori...if it did, there would be no problems with ulcers.

Thanks Tree...interesting! Another reason not to add salt to the diet, or to eat salty foods!!!!

TxLymie...interesting question...!

Tree, how are you feeling?

Peace, Love and Wellness,
JRW

Posts: 1414 | From Ny, Ny | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lou
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 81

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lou     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
H. pylori is not a spirochete. See classification details on this website, right side of the page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helicobacter_pylori

But wouldn't it be nice if borrelia had the same level of research done on it, to find out all the pathology associated?

Posts: 8430 | From Not available | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
aiden424
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7633

Icon 1 posted      Profile for aiden424     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
They do look kind of like a spirochete.


Kathy

--------------------
You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have.

Posts: 804 | From South Dakota | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
JRWagner
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 3229

Icon 1 posted      Profile for JRWagner     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sorry Lou...it IS a spiro:

A spirochete is any of many motile, gram-negative bacteria in the order Spirochaetales. They are characterized by having a flexible spiral shape; these bacteria are some of the easiest to recognize. They move with a twisting motion with the aid of their axial filaments, which are specialized internal flagella (a spirochete may have up to 200 of these filaments). Their cells can be from 5 to 500 micrometers long, which is gigantic in the germ world.

Most spirochetes are found in liquid environments such as mud, water, and body fluids. They reproduce via binary fission and are heterotrophic (they eat other matter or organisms); most species are either decomposers (saprophytes) or pathogens (parasites).

Many spirochete species cause human diseases:

Anaerobiospirillum spp.: diarrhea, vaginosis
Borrelia burgdorferi: Lyme disease
Borrelia hermsii: Borreliosis, tick-borne relapsing fever
Helicobacter pylori: stomach ulcers
Leptospira spp.: leptospirosis
Treponema pallidum: syphilis
Treponema pertenue: yaws, frambesia
Treponema carateum: pinta (a psoriasis-like skin infection)
Treponema vincenti: Vincent's angina, acute necrotizing gingivitis and stomatitis, trench mouth
There are many, many spirochetes which cause disease in animals; spirochetal infections can cause diarrhea and systemic infections in a wide range of domestic animals. Some of these illnesses can be very damaging to livestock and some can be transmitted to humans.

Some spirochetes will change their surface proteins to foil a person's or animal's immune system; thus, spirochetal diseases are very hard for one's body to fight off without the aid of antibiotics such as penicillin and clindamycin.

Posts: 1414 | From Ny, Ny | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AliG
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 9734

Icon 1 posted      Profile for AliG     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I just love a good debate! [Big Grin]

Sorry JR- It would seem that Lou's got you on a technicality. [Wink]

quote:
Originally posted by JRWagner:
A spirochete is any of many motile, gram-negative bacteria in the order Spirochaetales.

H.Pylori is not "in the order Spirochaetales", it's in the order "Campylobacterales". I think the differentiation has to do with the way they move.

I haven't read the article yet, so I don't know whether the info pertains to the structure of the organism or it's motility.


Helicobacter pylori

 -

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Bacteria
Phylum: Proteobacteria
Class: Epsilon Proteobacteria
Order: Campylobacterales
Family: Helicobacteraceae
Genus: Helicobacter
Species: H. pylori


Spirochaetes

 -
Treponema pallidum spirochetes.

Scientific classification
Domain: Bacteria
Phylum: Spirochaetes
Class: Spirochaetes
Order: Spirochaetales
Families:
  • Spirochaetaceae
    Borrelia
    Brevinema
    Cristispira
    Spirochaeta
    Spironema
    Treponema
  • Brachyspiraceae
    Brachyspira (Serpulina)
  • Leptospiraceae
    Leptospira
    Leptonema (bacteria)


From the above link on Spirochaetes:
quote:
Spirochaetes are distinguished from other bacterial phyla by the location of their flagella, sometimes called axial filaments, which run lengthwise between the cell membrane and outer membrane. These cause a twisting motion which allows the spirochaete to move about.
I'm going to go try to read the article now.

Thanks for sharing this, it looks very interesting by it's title. [Smile]

[hi]
Ali

[ 08-22-2009, 02:16 AM: Message edited by: AliG ]

--------------------
Note: I'm NOT a medical professional. The information I share is from my own personal research and experience. Please do not construe anything I share as medical advice, which should only be obtained from a licensed medical practitioner.

Posts: 4881 | From Middlesex County, NJ | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AliG
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 9734

Icon 1 posted      Profile for AliG     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OK, I've read it. [Smile]

I find this very interesting:
quote:
"This study indicates that the H. pylori, which is shaped very much like a screw, does not bore its way through the mucus gel like a screw through a cork as has previously been suggested," said Bansil. "Instead it achieves motility by using a clever biochemical strategy."
I wonder if Borrelia, being such an advanced organism, might employ similar strategies. I sincerely doubt anyone's ever done such a study.

As a matter of fact, I believe that NYU was planning to conduct a study of this nature.

I understood that it would be similar to the study done which showed how malaria organisms actually searched blindly to find a blood vessel, once injected by a mosquito. They were then able to make their way into the bloodstream & travel around inside the host.

They illustrated the entire infectious process at one of the www.LymeNYC.org support group meetings. It was quite interesting.

I did a quick search to find the name of the Dr. conducting the study & found this:

Postdoctoral Openings at NYU SoMed


* Department of Parasitology *posted 05/6/09

Immediate postdoctoral position available to work on imaging Lyme neuroborreliosis.

Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is characterized by widespread dysfunction of the central nervous system.

While much is known about the role of ticks in the transmission of B. burgdorferi, the biology of this pathogenic agent in various mammalian hosts, and the multi-organ involvement of the disease caused by this spirochete, little information is available on the dynamics of Borrelia interaction with the brain and the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis.

The available project will focus on the interaction of Borrelia as well as cells of the innate immune system with the cerebral microvasculature.

Techniques such as Borrelia cultivation, infection of small animals, intravital microscopy and live cell imaging, tissue preservation and immunolabeling, confocal and electron microscopy will be involved.

Interested applicants with a strong background in borreliosis, neuroscience, immunobiology of the brain, intravital imaging, cell biology, or infectious diseases please send a curriculum vitae including a short description of research interests, training and experience, and three references by email to:

Ute Frevert, DVM, PhD
Department of Medical Parasitology
NYU School of Medicine
341 E 25 St
New York, NY 10010
Tel 212-263-6755

[email protected]
Frevert Laboratory


That position was posted in May. I don't know whether the study has begun yet. I DO hope that they are able to uncover some useful information.

--------------------
Note: I'm NOT a medical professional. The information I share is from my own personal research and experience. Please do not construe anything I share as medical advice, which should only be obtained from a licensed medical practitioner.

Posts: 4881 | From Middlesex County, NJ | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.