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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Weight gain from Rocephin?

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Author Topic: Weight gain from Rocephin?
Connieaag
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My daughter started Rocephin September 28th and has gained quite a bit of weight since then -- 10+ pounds. She also started Coumadin and Ursodiol at the same time. About three weeks ago she went off Cortef per her LLMD, so she could have some further endrocrine testing done.

Her appetite has actually deceased a lot with the IV Rocephin, so I know it's not just extra calories. She has been drinking water. Anyone else experience weight gain with Rocephin or any of the related meds? It isn't a side effect that is listed with any of the new ones, and if anything Cortef would have caused weight gain while she was on it.

Could she not be detoxing enough? Thanks

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feelfit
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I lost 20 pounds while on IV Rocephin. Maybe different body types and various other factors determine this and not necessarily the Rocephin.

Feelfit

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Keebler
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After an initial weight loss, weigh gain is VERY common with lyme -even for some patients who eat very little.

Some of that is from inflammation and resultant water weight. Some, just the way lyme works. When treatment for infection(s) is successful, the weight usually disappears as fast as it went on.

Just in case she thinks she should eat even less: the focus should be on getting enough good food. It's no time to cut back, even if she thinks she should starve. Good food (not processed) is nutrition that our cells need right now and food helps our bodies take away toxins, too. I dieted most of my life. Barely ate at all. It was a mistake.

Please read this book before you run any more tests. This book is specific to lyme and other chronic stealth infections.

The author discusses the endocrine connection and effects of STRESS on a person with such infections. Endocrine support matters greatly and if she is off of cortef, I hope she is on other endrocrine support such as ashwagandha, cordyceps or Siberian Ginseng.

You can read customer reviews and look inside the book at this link to its page at Amazon.

http://tinyurl.com/6xse7l


The Potbelly Syndrome: How Common Germs Cause Obesity, Diabetes, And Heart Disease (Paperback) - 2005

by Russell Farris and Per Marin, MD, PhD
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Keebler
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You also asked: "Could she not be detoxing enough? "

Rather than "detox events" that can sometimes even overwhelm the liver, I feel better about ongoing liver support supplements. Milk Thistle, NAC, to protect the liver from lyme toxins and also from the medicines that can be hard on the liver.

Did her LLMD check kidney function?

Curcumin (basically a very concentrated Turmeric) might be a good antioxidant as it also helps reduce inflammation (and, hopefully, swelling from that). Adding Turmeric to foods might be of help.

How old is your daughter?

Hope this gets better.
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Connieaag
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She's 16 and was bitten in June 2004. Treated with 10 days ABX, but since we saw no tick, just a huge round place,no one even mentioned Lyme. Started Lyme tx in April 2008.
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sammy
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I have also gained weight since starting Rocephin. Whether this is a side effect of Rocephin or another symptom of Lyme itself is hard to say.

Lyme is known to cause problems with every body system. Makes me believe that the weight is more likely caused by endocrine dysfunction/hormonal imbalances. Subtle changes can cause symptoms long before doctors are able to pick up abnormal lab results.

Before I started Rocephin I was definitely on the skinny side. I could afford to gain some weight but not this much. I try to be very careful of what, how much, and when I eat now.

Got on my Wii Fit today, it told me that I've gained 5lbs and aged 6 yrs over the past 2 days. It's frustrating, I don't want to gain anymore weight. And I certainly did not eat enough to gain 5lbs in 2 days!

Others have reassured me that once Lyme is in remission, weight stabilizes again. I hold on to that hope. I want to be healthy all around!

Instead of focusing on the weight itself, try to help your daughter focus on what is healthy. Encourage the whole family to eat good healthy foods, get adequate exercise, and appropriate rest. That will be more helpful in the long run.

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Keebler
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Here are some of the guidelines around exercise but, ultimately, it's a very individualized path with each patient's LLMD's guidance especially considering adrenal fatigue that often goes with lyme.

Adrenal fatigue can require rest for safety. If the adrenals and HPA axis have too much stress, the result will actually be more weight gain.

==========

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Treatment Guidelines, 16h edition, October, 2008
Joseph J. Burrascano, Jr., M.D.

Page 20:
. . .

If treatment can be continued long term, then a remarkable degree of recovery is possible.

However, attention must be paid to all treatment modalities for such a recovery - not only antibiotics, but rehab and exercise programs, nutritional supplements, enforced rest, low carbohydrate, high fiber diets, attention to food sensitivities, avoidance of stress, abstinence from caffeine and alcohol, and absolutely no immunosuppressants, even local doses of steroids (intra-articular injections, for example).

. . . .

Page 31:
. . .

LYME DISEASE REHABILITATION

Despite antibiotic treatments, patients will NOT return to normal unless they exercise, so therefore an aggressive rehab program is absolutely necessary. It is a fact that a properly executed exercise program can actually go beyond the antibiotics in helping to clear the symptoms and to maintain a remission.

Although the scientific basis for the benefits of exercises is not known, there are several reasonable theories.

It is known that Bb will die if exposed to all but the tiniest oxygen concentrations. If an aggressive exercise program can increase tissue perfusion and oxygen levels, then this may play a role in what is being seen.


Also, during aggressive exercise, the core body temperature can rise above 102 degrees; it is known that B. burgdorferi is very heat sensitive. Perhaps it is the added tissue oxygenation, or higher body temperature, or the combination that weakens the Lyme Borrelia, and allows the antibiotics and our defenses to be more effective.

Regular exercise-related movements can help mobilize lymph and enhance circulation. In addition,there is now evidence that a carefully structured exercise program may benefit T-cell function: this function will depress for 12 to 24+ hours after exercise, but then rebound.


This T-cell depression is more pronounced after aerobics which is why aerobics are not allowed. The goal is to exercise intermittently, with exercise days separated by days of total rest, including an effort to have plenty of quality sleep.


The trick is to time the exercise days to take advantage of these rebounds. For an example, begin with an exercise day followed by 3 to 5 rest days; as stamina improves, then fewer rest days will be needed in between workouts.


However, because T-cell functions do fall for at least one day after aggressive exercises, be sure to never exercise two days in a row. Finally, an in intermittent exercise program, properly executed, may help to reset the HPA axis more towards normal.


On the following page is an exercise prescription that details these recommendations.


This program may begin with classical physical therapy if necessary. The physical therapy should involve massage, heat, ultrasound and simple range of motion exercises to relieve discomfort and promote better sleep and flexibility.


Ice (vasoconstriction) and electrical stimulation (muscle spasm and trauma) should not be used!


The program must evolve into a graded, ultimately strenuous exercise program that consists of a specific regimen of non-aerobic conditioning- see below.


Have the patient complete a gentle hour of prescribed exercise, then go home, have a hot bath or shower, than try to take a nap. Initially, patients will need this sleep, but as they recover, the exercise will energize them and then a nap will no longer be needed.

NOTE: a cardiac stress test may be necessary prior to exercising to ensure safety.

-------------

Page 32:

LYME REHAB-PHYSICAL THERAPY PRESCRIPTION

. . . (there is a P.T. prescription all set to fill out here) . . .

Excerpt:

PROGRAM:

1. Aerobic exercises are NOT allowed, not even low impact variety, until the patient has recovered.


2. Conditioning: work to improve strength and reverse the poor conditioning that results from Lyme, through a whole-body exercise program, consisting of light calisthenics and/or resistance training, using light resistance and many repetitions.


This can be accomplished in exercise classes called "stretch and tone", or "body sculpture", or can be achieved in the gym with exercise machines or carefully with free weights (see cautions above).


3. Each session should last one hour. A gentle hour is preferable to a strenuous half-hour. If the patient is unable to continue for the whole hour, then decrease the intensity to allow him/her to do so.


4. Exercise no more often than every other day. The patient may need to start by exercising every 4th or 5th day initially, and as abilities improve, work out more often, but NEVER two days in a row. The nonexercise days should be spent resting.


5. This whole-body conditioning program is what is required to achieve wellness. A simple walking program will not work, and simply placing the patient on a treadmill or an exercise bike is not acceptable (except very briefly, as part of a warm-up), as aerobics can be damaging and must be avoided.

. . . .

Much more at the link.

=====

http://www.lymepa.org/Nutritional_Supplements.pdf

Nutritional Supplements in Disseminated Lyme Disease

J.J. Burrascano, Jr., MD (2008)

-=============

www.ott.zynet.co.uk/polio/lincolnshire/library/uk/post-me.html

or http://tinyurl.com/33rxy8

From Dr. Bruno's "Fainting and Fatigue" in the Spring 1996 CFIDS Chronicle


Post-polio expert Dr. Richard Bruno points out that physical over-activity is the biggest cause of post-polio symptoms. [3]

Excerpt:

``when mice infected with Coxsackie B3 were forced to swim in a warm pool, the virulence of the virus was drastically augmented.

In fact, viral replication was augmented 530 times. This did horrendous things to the animals' hearts. We all know that to play squash with the flu can lead to heart attacks.

Much the same danger can be courted by undertaking hard exercise with M.E. (CFS).'' End quote.

Lyme disease, also, has cautions about aerobic exercise until nearly well.

====================

PDF: www.cfids.org/sparkcfs/working-out.pdf

HTML version - without photos for easier printing: http://tinyurl.com/4qevgl


WHEN WORKING OUT DOESN'T WORK OUT

By Dr. Christopher R. Snell, Dr. J. MarkVanNess and Staci R. Stevens, et.al.

From THE CFIDS CHRONICLE SUMMER 2004


======================

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/77325

Topic: To everyone with cardiac symptoms please read!

=======================

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/86028?

Topic: QiGong & Tai Chi & Yoga
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sammy
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Interesting point Keebler:
"Adrenal fatigue can require rest for safety. If the adrenals and HPA axis have too much stress, the result will actually be more weight gain."

I have wondered if this was possible. When I have let myself rest and actually taken naps when needed, my weight tends to drop down a little (3-5lbs). When I push through, make myself exercise, and refuse to take a nap when I need to then my weight tends to increase (again 3-5lbs).

Why does this happen?

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Keebler
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The POTBELLY book explains that to a degree. It's very complex so I can't begin to do justice to an explanation.


Also, Cushings syndrome is an adrenal dysfunction that causes a round belly . . . go to www.vrp.com and search articles for: adrenal


Without rest, though, damaged adrenals don't stand a chance. Sometimes, that means avoiding all stimuli, even light and sound. Even a light touch for a patient in adrenal failure can be more stimulation than they can handle. It's pretty amazing.

I think a lot of the exercise intolerance in lyme patient is due to adrenal stress (as well as the liver being overwhelmed and not able to handle exertion).

There are more links to adrenal books in this thread:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/86110

Hydrocortisone

============

And, recently, science had found a connection between lack of quality sleep and obesity. Good sleep is very difficult for most lyme patients to achieve. And sleep drugs often just overwhelm the liver more . . . so it can be a cycle.
-

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