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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Pathological Laughing and Crying

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Author Topic: Pathological Laughing and Crying
roro
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Anyone else have this?

I have more of a problem with the laughing than the crying. I do cry very easily, but not for very long.

The laughing however is really pronouinced. I laugh so hard I lose my breath and sound like mutley. Its really a lot of fun, but not how I used to be.

Today I went to put napkins on the top shelf of the closet, and they fell and half the bag fell all over me. I grabbed them best I could but started laughing. [lol]

Started laughing so hard, I had to sit down. Went over to sit on the couch, but the fan was pointing there, and more napkins started falling and flying all over and I was trying to grab them.


I really lost it. I could not stop laughing for about 15 minutes. It seems that something makes me laugh, then my laugh sounds funny to me and it makes me laugh even more at the rediculousness of it.

PLC is usually seen in stroke victims or multiple sclerosis patients. Also ALS, parkinson's etc. So It is mostly all the things I was originally wrongly diagnosed with before lyme.

Whatever the cause, I am having fun. Its nice to have a good symptom for a change. Now if I could only have weight-loss [Wink]

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Keebler
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-
Oh, do have fun.

It could be a way your body and brain has figured out to relieve some stress during some very stressful times. It may just be that punchy tiredness letting you have some fun.

Beyond that, I am not sure who thought up the term, PLC, but It can be a sort of seizure activity (and seizures are not uncommon to lyme). I've had that happen at times, also sometimes the crying, right after seizures.

When this all first started (and before I knew I had lyme) I called the Epilepsy Foundation at least once a week with some sort of odd stuff my body was going through. I was told that seizure activity can take any form - if an activity involves any neurological functions then it is possible for those to be pronounced and heightened during seizures. Excessive laughing can be in that category.

I remember a time after getting an EEG, waiting in a small room and a nurse slammed open the door and rush in. I flew off the couch but not before seeing the shock and surprise on his face.

I fell to the floor, with myoclonic and tonic seizure but when that subsided, I could - not - stop - laughing as the look on his face just got me laughing so. He must have thought I was making fun and he was not happy about it.

And then the crying hit. I could not stop. Everyone just wanted me to get up off the floor but my body was paralyzed temporarily. I could not move. They did not realized the laughing and crying was a continuance of the seizure in this case.

I prefer times when I can just laugh for fun. So, here's to some funny stuff happening for everyone this weekend.
-

[ 10-17-2009, 01:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Ocean
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Yea!!! Good for you...finally a good symptom!

I have not had this, just the crying part....but your post made me smile nice and big...I loved how you described the napkins flying all over as you were laughing, I could picture it.

Thanks for making me smile tonight...I needed it =)

Ocean

--------------------
http://www.healingfromlymedisease.blogspot.com/

Sick since 1996...Diagnosed 10/2008

IgM:23-25 IND, 31+++, 39 IND, 41 +++
IgG: 31 IND, 41++, 58+

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METALLlC BLUE
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That is in-fact one symptom of Lyme Disease. Other infectious diseases (Including syphillis) can infect parts of the brain which bring about "pleasurable" feelings, including sexual feelings or intense attraction to another, euphoria, mania (high productivity and quick thinking) and...."Humor." Laughing is a biological process used by the mind to mitigate stress, like crying. Note that patients with Lyme report crying hysterically or unexpectedly from "no trigger" or minor triggers (Like commercials) I'm speaking about these responses which are unrelated to the situation of the illness, but rather inherently a result of the biology of the illness).

--------------------
I am not a physician, so do your own research to confirm any ideas given and then speak with a health care provider you trust.

E-mail: [email protected]

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RDaywillcome
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I also went through the laughing, but it was a teacher I was talking with, and she was being serious, but I lost it, and started laughing.
I couldn't stop, but she understood...Thank God!

Another time, I was sitting at the dinner table, and started to stutter. You must understand that my S.O. stutters. His face when I did it was like...what the? I couldn't stop laughing. He realized that I wasn't making fun of him...but couldn't help myself.

It will go away with treatment, so hang in there and enjoy it! Laughter is theeeeeeeeeee best medicine whether others think so or not!

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JamesNYC
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My friend with neuro-lyme has had episodes like this. She was diagnosed with bi-polar disorder for 8 years. She has mood swings especially at the onset of a seizure.

She can cycle through laughing, crying, combativeness, and mania. Sometimes within minutes.

The psych said it's atypical "rapid cycling" bi-polar. But what about the seizures? Oh, that is just her throwing a tantrum for attention.

We know better now.

I am glad to hear that it's a fun symptom for a change.

James

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mixxster
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Hey I have this EXACT same issue. For me the uncontrollable smiling and laughing is involuntary, and even when I'm serious, or upset, I will be smiling and laughing, which makes me look and feel like a fool. For me its quite terrifying and uncomfortable. There is a scientific name for this condition: emotional lability.

My experience is that even with 9 months of Lyme treatment, it doesn't get better. I therefore don't think that for me it is caused by Lyme.

I had no explanation for this other than thinking it was part of my bipolar disorder. But then I was treated for Bartonella (Levoquin 500mg, 1.5 months in) and the bipolar disorder went away immediately. My mania, anxiety are no more. This uncontrollable laughing and smiling which I thought was mania seemed to be unconnected to bipolar disorder as well.

When I finally got around to reading about Babesiosis, it seemed to explain this and everything else I am currently suffering from. I googled 'Babesiosis symptoms' The first result was:
When to Suspect and How to Monitor Babesiosis - May 15, 2001 ...

Here is the quote that completely enlightened my life, after as many as 19 years of suffering:
quote:
Signs of central nervous system involvement include:
headache,  -
photophobia,  -
neck and back stiffness,  -  -
altered sensorium,  -

and emotional lability...

I have all of that, but hold on, "Emotional something-or-other? What's that even mean? Does that explain my uncontrollable laughing, smiling, and occassional crying spouts?"

So next I read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_lability

That was enough to convince me. Now waiting for Igenex results for Babesia. Have not started treatment. Hope my story helped.

[ 10-22-2009, 07:07 PM: Message edited by: mixxster ]

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bettyg
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breaking up for us severe neuro lyme folks to be able to read ... bg


quote:
Originally posted by METALLlC BLUE:

That is in-fact one symptom of Lyme Disease.

Other infectious diseases (Including syphillis) can infect parts of the brain which bring about "pleasurable" feelings, including sexual feelings or intense attraction to another, euphoria, mania (high productivity and quick thinking) and...."Humor."


Laughing is a biological process used by the mind to mitigate stress, like crying.

Note that patients with Lyme report crying hysterically or unexpectedly from "no trigger" or minor triggers (Like commercials)


I'm speaking about these responses which are unrelated to the situation of the illness, but rather inherently a result of the biology of the illness).

i'm so glad you had a good BELLY LAUGHING DAY; less wrinkles on your face and body! see that are some positives. lol [Smile]

i too can see the napkins flying with the ceiling fans help; what a sight.

hope you have some more good ones helping the stressful days we all have. hugs/kisses

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roro
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Usually when this happens my husband is around. At work I can stop it more easily. But when my husband is there, he is laughing at me and making me laugh more.

One of the things I love about him the most is his sense of humor.

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seibertneurolyme
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Hysterical laughter. Hubby has had this a few times. I actually looked it up and there is a type of seizure that involves laughter.

Bea Seibert

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WildCondor
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OMG I used to get that quite often! Was quite entertaining actually at times. For me certain medications would make me laugh hysterically (Biaxin especially did this) and others (Rocephin) made me have these crying fits out of the blue with no reason for it emotionally. It all went away in time. A scientific explanation would be cool to see on this!
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TS96
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I had this as a child. I hated it because I would have it in a middle of a test and sometimes sent to the principals office for not controlling myself.

I had no control over it.

I've heard it said it involves the limbic system but not sure.

--------------------
Bart Henslea 1976
Fibro/CFS/arthritis 2004
Lyme diagnosed 2007
3 1/2 years treatment with oral combos, Cowden, IV roc. BW herbs. Off all abx in 12/10. Feeling good.

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