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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » High Cholesterol Protects Against Infection

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Author Topic: High Cholesterol Protects Against Infection
massman
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High Cholesterol Protects Against Infection

Many studies have found that low cholesterol is in certain respects worse than high cholesterol.

For instance, in 19 large studies of more than 68,000 deaths, reviewed by Professor David R. Jacobs and his co-workers from the Division of Epidemiology at the University of Minnesota, low cholesterol predicted an increased risk of dying from gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases.3

Most gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases have an infectious origin. Therefore, a relevant question is whether it is the infection that lowers cholesterol or the low cholesterol that predisposes to infection?

To answer this question Professor Jacobs and his group, together with Dr. Carlos Iribarren, followed more than 100,000 healthy individuals in the San Francisco area for fifteen years. At the end of the study those who had low cholesterol at the start of the study had more often been admitted to the hospital because of an infectious disease.4,5

This finding cannot be explained away with the argument that the infection had caused cholesterol to go down, because how could low cholesterol, recorded when these people were without any evidence of infection, be caused by a disease they had not yet encountered?

Isnt it more likely that low cholesterol in some way made them more vulnerable to infection, or that high cholesterol protected those who did not become infected? Much evidence exists to support that interpretation.

from: www.westonaprice.org

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soleil16
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Very interesting. I usually read of other people who have too high of cholesterol with Lyme.

My cholesterol is so low that I have been asked to eat a very high cholesterol diet and take lots of supplements to try to raise it.

I have a family history of very good low cholesterol, but multiple doctors have now been extremely worried by how low mine is- it barely registers on the tests.

Two doctors have suggested that part of my severe neuro problems might be because of low cholesterol- apparently cholesterol helps with nerve protection also.

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massman
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Eating cholesterol has zero zippo nada to do with your cholesterol levels. The current disease care system simplifies things way too much. I feel that is just to sell more drugs.

But too low is a major concern and great probability there is liver involvement.

Any gallbladder problems or family history of that ?

The "insulation" covering many nerves is made from fats. Cell membranes are from cholesterol.

I love coconut oil as you can heat it to fry foods in and not burn the oil. Olive oil burns when used at moderate to high temperatures.

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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by massman:
Eating cholesterol has zero zippo nada to do with your cholesterol levels. The current disease care system simplifies things way too much. I feel that is just to sell more drugs.


Yep!

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disturbedme
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Interesting. I have extremely high cholesterol.... had high cholesterol since I was 18 or so (and it never mattered that I was vegetarian or worked out 1 to 2 hours daily and stayed fit). I'm only 25 now and it's SOOOOO high, like 330 high!!! I guess it makes sense then that it would be high due to infection - probably lyme or co-infection....

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Posts: 2965 | From Land of Confusion (bitten in KS, moved to PA, now living in MD) | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TerryK
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Dr. Sherry A. Rogers, author of "Detoxify or Die" believes that high cholesterol is a sign of increased ROS activity.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) kill bacteria and neutralize toxins. Our ROS increases with infection.

Once ROS (naked, wildly destructive electrons) are on the loose, they eat holes in arteries that then attracts nature's band-aid, cholesterol. Increased cholesterol indicates increased ROS.

Lyme increases ROS so it is natural to have increased cholesterol. You can help balance ROS with anti-oxidants. I think the best way to lower cholestrol is by treating the infections and dealing with the toxins.

Terry
I'm not a doctor

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canbravelyme
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Perhaps this would explain why so few of us get sick, despite low immunity.

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For medical advice related to Lyme disease, please see an ILADS physician.

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orrn
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I've always wondered about that because I don't catch normal stuff that easy...like colds or the flu. Thanks for the information!

orrn

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