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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Homemade bone broth (stock) and my GI

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Author Topic: Homemade bone broth (stock) and my GI
Hoosiers51
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Those of you not familiar with bone broths may be confused as to why this is in medical...but it's considered a "healing food." Hoping massman or someone else will answer my question(s).

This latest batch I made seemed extremely "powerful" in that it was darker in color and was on the stove for at least 12 hours. I also added chicken feet after reading on the Weston Price site that those are good. I think I actually added too many feet (like 7).

And after the broth was stored in the fridge, it became the consistency of jello (the Weston Price site said this would happen) until I heated it up again. My other batches in the past did not turn to jello like that.

After drinking it, it was making my stomach gurgle noticably. Is this a good or a bad thing? Is that normal? That's my question.

I used vinegar to leech out the minerals, and basically followed the directions on the Weston Price site ("Broth is Beautiful"...the article).

This is the first batch that has made my gut gurgle like that (but this has been the strongest batch), and it was freaking me out. So just wondering if this is okay/normal, or if that means it's not agreeing with my body.

Thank you!

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Tincup
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Gee Hooz...

You know I'd love to help you out here, but it has been a long time since I've eaten any chicken feet.

And it may be a while longer before I consider eating chicken feet again. I don't think I am quite that hungry.

In my best estimation, I probably won't be that hungry for at least the next 40 years or so.

But I do hope other chicken feet eaters will come along to help you out. And I'll be sure to note who those weirdo's are too!

[Big Grin]

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Hoosiers51
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I didn't eat the chicken feet! They just have a lot of cartilidge/gelatin or whatever, so they add a lot to the broth. This is how people make homemade stocks/broths in 3rd world countries.

After the 8-12 hours, you strain the broth, so the feet go in the garbage!

Hope that makes sense.

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Hoosiers51
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Here is the article I was talking about, that talks about why bone broths are healthy, and it mentions the feet:

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/broth.html

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Tincup
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Hey Hooz...

Just so you know I was kidding! But actually, I don't care to even think about chicken feet being in anything I cook on the stove and then have to eat. Sorry!

I've seen too many chickens and where their feet go.. and what they step in.

But then again, I have cooked pigs heads to make scrapple. Guess that probably isn't quite as healthy as the chicken feet idea though, huh?

Sorry, you've got me laughing... but I do hope you find out why your stomach is gurgling and grumbling.

Although, now that I think about it...

If I were your stomach and you were eating chicken feet, I'd be doing a lot more than just grumbling!

[Big Grin]

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Robin123
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Interesting. This is what every Armenian taxicab driver tells me to do when they find out I have unstable joints. They swear by the bones broth remedy. Usually it's their grandmother's cooking.

I haven't done it yet, maybe for the same sentiments that TC has expressed, but hey, sometimes we just have to take the bull by the horns or wherever else and get that crockpot going!

My guess would be that you shouldn't overdo drinking the broth since it has so much in it - try a tiny amount and test.

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Hoosiers51
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Okay, gotcha Tincup!

Yup, Robin. Homemade bone broth contains glucosamine and condroitin (spelling?) in it, which are two things people take to treat arthritis (but they pay a lot more, to get it in pill form).

If you think about it, it makes perfect sense....these are substances that are supposed to be IN our joints/bones....so we boil the bones/joints of animals, and those minerals leech out into the broth. It is genius, really.

I think in America we are very sanitized, but in other cultures, it isn't so odd to have claws and hooves and heads in your soup pot.

It all gets strained out at the end, of course! [Smile]

But if you do decide to do this, these tips helped me: Let the bones/feet, etc sit in the water, with 2-4 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar (this leeches out the minerals) for an hour, cold. THEN, turn on the heat, bring to a boil, and then reduce to a slow simmer. Chicken should be simmered for 6-8 hours. And be sure not to use an aluminum pot.

Hope that helps! I am very "into" this whole idea, though I haven't gotten very far with it yet...

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Tincup
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Hey Hooz...

When I cook regular broth for my chicken soup, the bones (carcass) of the chicken is used and I cook it for hours. I get a good bit of "jell" too... much more so than the final liquid.

Guess I do it like the 3rd world countries after all? Minus the feet of course.

And I would think the final product you have is quite rich and even a bit oily (?)

Could that cause the grumbling?

[Big Grin]

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Robin123
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I actually think it's an excellent health idea for folks to pursue who can. Just read the article - this kind of cooking is worldwide.

Also the article explains how MSG came in to imitate meat flavor and deprived everyone of the mineral nourishment from animal stock.

I would need to use a crockpot. Cabdrivers - my source on broth cooking - say it's ok.

Maybe TC will need her chicken feet dipped in chocolate.

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Carol in PA
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Hey Hoos.......come into chat.
We are all wondering where you bought the chicken feet, lol.

Carol

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Hoosiers51
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TC, I'd say you are on your way to becoming an Armenian grandmother.

Actually, what I had wasn't very fatty, because I skimmed the fat off after it sat in the fridge overnight.

Carol, My mom is in the guest room, so I can't use the computer I use for chat! (my laptop is too old to support chat)

But I got the chicken feet from a local butcher's shop. They had to order them for me, and it took 2-3 days. Supposedly you can get them at some ethnic food stores too, so I might check that out.

My mom went in to the butcher's with me when I was looking for the feet, and I just assumed, being a private butcher, they would have them. I figured they were butchering their own chickens (and passing the savings onto me perhaps?)

So when the guys behind the counter said they didn't have chicken feet, I apparently said in a very shocked tone of voice, "You don't have CHICKEN FEET?"

When we left, my mom was making fun of me for it....she was like, "geez, make them feel bad!" hahaha. Whops. But anyways, they ordered them for me.

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Hoosiers51
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All seriousness aside though, the foot thing is kind of funny. When I lifted up the lid of the soup pot at one point, it looked like the broth was going to jump out and attack me, becauase of the claws. LOL

So what are you guys waiting for? [Wink]

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Robin123
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I guess the time it takes to do something like this - if you have it, great - I usually don't. Is there anyway to speed up the broth making other than find a restaurant around here with it?!
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MariaA
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I'm a bit too tired to write up more, but there's a lot of total garbage at that site. People are absolutely fanatical there, but I've read through the 'studies' they quote and almost all of them are some kind of bad science that backs up their bizarre assertions about high-fat, high-protein diets. By the way, I grew up on and still often eat a 'traditional' Eastern European diet similar to the ones they claim to base their ideas on- chicken feet, gelatinous broth and all- and it's not from lack of familiarity with 'traditional', low-sugar, low-refined-grains diet that I think the Weston Price Foundation (which has almost no connection to Weston Price himself) is mostly wrong. They promote this cartoon version of the cultural habits they claim to represent.

Sally Fallon's cookbook is marketed as an answer to fad diets- but for the most part, what she's offering is just another fad, a backlash against vegetarianism and a backlash against some other health fads that immediately preceded it.

Also, one of the authors of some of the rants at the site, the author of 'the vegetarian myth' article, died of a stroke at 40. Not that this couldn't have been an coincidence, but it's pretty likely that his insane high-fat diet has something to do with it.

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jkmom
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I don't know the answer to your question but I am about to make a similar broth only from beef. My recipe (from Sally Fallon's cookbook) said including a cow hoof was optional. I am going to skip that part!

My daughter's new LLMD has recommended that she drink beef broth as a healing food. He said I should follow the Sally Fallon recipe and use only grass-fed beef. It took me a while to find a local source of grass-fed beef marrow bones, but I will get them on Saturday.

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Hoosiers51
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Thanks for the insight, Maria.

I am not doing the whole diet....haven't really read up a lot about it, actually. Just have read the bone broth stuff, after a nutritionist wanted me to try it.

She didn't refer me specifically to the Weston Price site, but I found it when googling different ways to make the stock. It seemed like the way that lined up best with how she was wanting me to make my stock.

Personally, I feel that I need carbs, so I can't imagine myself on a strictly high protein diet. And I definitely wouldn't recommend lots of animal fats and butter to someone like my Dad, who is at risk for a heart attack genetically (despite being in good physical condition).

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Hoosiers51
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Robin,

It does take some energy to get the stuff together, etc. But you don't need lots of time per se, because you can use a crock pot (Hamilton Beach is a good brand that does not add lead to their glazes), or if you are comfortable, you can just leave your stove on low if you are only running out for an hour or two.

I found that by using an organic, free range chicken carcass, there was nothing to "skim" off the top, so it wasn't necessary for me to babysit it while it simmered.

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Tincup
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I have a bone to pick with you my dear! No pun intended!

[Big Grin]

I woke this morning and the FIRST thing that popped into my head.. the very first thing... before I even opened my eyes...

Was a picture of a pot of boiling broth on my stove with chicken feet sticking out all over the place!

UGGGGGGG!!!!!! What a way to start the day!!! But...

As the wicked witch says in the Wizard of Oz... in a screechy awful voice...

"I'll get you my little pretty... and your little dog too!"

[Big Grin]

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massman
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I think your stomach gurgled cause it was wondering how you found a chicken with SEVEN feet !

Not six, not eight but SEVEN ! [Big Grin]

Broth may be thick due to time boiled.

Seems like Dr. Price made things too simple for todays junk GMO plastic so called foodies - the stay away from fat eat your WHOLE grains yada yada yada. [dizzy]

And if lotsa people say something then we all should know FOR SURE it is true. [Roll Eyes]

Vegetarians ? Let me reference my main mentor here. Travels the world to see, advise + treat people, just as his mentor did. In about 20 years he found only one healthy vegetarian. ONE.

She knew how to specifically combine foods to cover ALL essential amino acids on a daily basis. She studied AND applied this knowledge. And fats.

Anyway, as you can tell, I could go on + on + on about this. I have had lots of interest + education in nutrition for the last 40 years. And tried many ways of eating.

Peoples minds are already made up here. I feel we ate other animals from the first day we could catch them.

Hey, cruised Dr. Alan Sears info yesterday and he is saying that he is helping many who have had strokes, heart attacks + high blood pressure by recommending they eat like Dr.____ _____ suggested. Fill in the blank.

IMO the seven feet are a bit crunchy when you eat them. But.....mmm...mmm...GOOD. Just like your broth [Cool]

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Hoosiers51
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Alright....but does anyone have any real guesses as to whether the gurgling = good or bad?

That was my main question.

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springshowers
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LOL NOt sure I am glad I read the posts.. LOL

I did laugh and Tin .. so funny. OMG

But Hoosier.. I would say its a GOOD sign. I find when I give myself something that will help with digestion that I can feel it.

If your feeling crampy or sick to your stomach .. well it might be bad?

Go with how you feel. I would also watch your digestion over the next days and see if it has improved etc.

I think.. like is said.. that Mild gurgling is good.

: )

Now I feel like that was funny to. But I was being serious.. Really.

I get that sometimes when just chicken soup with a good healthy broth..

[ 12-04-2009, 01:38 AM: Message edited by: springshowers ]

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Hoosiers51
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Okay, thanks spring. That is helpful.

It wasn't painful or uncomfortable, just gurgling (noises) in the abdomen. I can't say I've experienced anything like that before, so was wondering what I should make of it.

Thank you!

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map1131
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Hoosiers I thought of you last night watching "Survivor". They had a big pot of broth going on the pit with chicken legs sticking up.

Pam

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GiGi
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Still have the turkey carcass in the freezer. My mother used to make broth and lived to be in her nineties. I always have a pot simmering on the stove. And this is a good explanation why:

Health Benefits of Bone Broth

Bone broths, made from both water and land animals, have played an important role in the diets of all traditional cultures including French, Italian, Asian, Russian, African, Latin, and Middle Eastern, for thousands of years. Not only have they been used as nourishing foods but, perhaps more importantly, as medicine. Though the medicinal applications are commonly thought to be restricted to the weak and invalid, there is a long list of conditions which can find benefit from the use of bone broths (see below). Because broth can be regarded as a liquefied form of the important components of bones, the medicinal benefits of bone broth are attributed to the exceptionally high levels of minerals and amino acids. In fact bone broth can be considered both a high quality multi-mineral and protein supplement.

Minerals
Healthy bone tissue is inherently rich in minerals, particularly calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and to a lesser extent potassium, silicon, sulphur, sodium, some fluoride, and other trace minerals. Broths made from fish bones will also provide iodine. Minerals are required not only to give the bones structure and strength, but are also used throughout the body as enzyme co-factors, as nervous system and hormone regulators and as bodily fluid regulators. In fact, attesting to the immense importance of minerals in the body, their levels are tightly monitored and controlled in the blood; to such an extent that when they fall below the desired level in the blood, the body will pull minerals from the largest mineral storage place in the body - the bones - to bring blood and other fluid levels back to required amounts.

In making bone broth, the best mineral extraction occurs when something acidic (like vinegar or lemon juice) is added to the water to ``pull'' the minerals out of the bone. In this way, the minerals act as alkalinizing agents to neutralize the acidity of the liquid. It is in this medium of a rich bone broth that minerals are provided in the most readily and easily absorbable form providing the best mineral supplement one could use.

Collagen
Collagen is a protein extracted in broth via the breakdown of bone and cartilage during the cooking process and is referred to as gelatin. The quality of broth is usually determined by the amount of gelatin it contains. A rich gelatinous broth will result from using parts rich in cartilage like joints, knuckles, back bones, feet, etc. Gelatin has long been a valued food source. Although it is not a complete protein, it contains only two amino acids in sufficient quantities, it is considered a protein sparer. This means that protein deficiency will not result from eating smaller amounts of complete proteins when they are combined with gelatin - for example a smaller amount of meat will ``go further'' in the body to provide vital protein when it is combined with gelatin.

Additional health contributions from gelatin are particularly important for the digestive system. It is thought to enhance digestion by attracting digestive juices to food in the gut. It is also prescribed to calm, soothe and heal the gut lining. Gelatin is therefore a first line therapeutic food for anyone suffering from debilitation due to digestive problems or conditions affecting the digestive tract.

Because gelatin is derived in large amounts from cartilage (found in abundance in joints), a third benefit of the gelatin found in bone broths is that it provides a readily usable source of glucosamine and chondroitin. These nutrients are particularly important for maintaining and regaining joint health.

Conditions which are benefited by the consumption of bone broth (alphabetical listing)

aging skin
allergies
anemia
anxiety
asthma
atherosclerosis
attention deficit
bean maldigestion
brittle nails
carbohydrate maldigestion
Celiac Disease
colic
confusion
constipation
dairy maldigestion
delusions
dental degeneration
depression
detoxification
Diabetes
diarrhea
fatigue
food sensitivities
fractures
Gastritis
grain maldigestion
heart attack
high cholesterol
hyperactivity
hyperchlorhydria (reflux, ulcer)
hyperparathyroidism (primary)
hypertension
hypochlorhydria
hypoglycemia
immunodepression
increased urination
infectious disease
inflammation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis)
insomnia
intestinal bacterial infections
irritability
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Jaundice
joint injury
Kidney stones
leaky gut
loss of appetite
meat maldigestion
memory
muscle cramps
muscle spasms
muscle wasting
muscle weakness
Muscular Dystrophy
nausea
nervousness
Osteoarthritis
Osteomalacia
Osteoporosis
pain
palpitations
Periodontal Disease
pregnancy
rapid growth
restlessness
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
seizure
shallow breathing
stupor
virility
vomiting
weakness
weight loss due to illness
wound healing


Further reading and resources:
Weston A Price Foundation website and Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon

``Traditional Bone Broth in Modern Health and Disease''
by Allison Siebecker
http://www.townsendletter.com/FebMarch2005/broth0205.htm

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beths
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I make chicken soup from bones. Put it in the crock pot..turn it on and forget about it!
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canefan17
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Bump

So for those of us who haven't tried this and would rather hear from you guys/gals then research it on the net...

Is this as simple as buying a full chicken... (I can cook the chicken first in oven?)... then keeping all of the bones and proceeding to make a broth with those bones?

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soccermama
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Yes. Cook the chicken bones about 24 hours. Here is the link to the site I use to make mine.

http://wellnessmama.com/5888/how-to-make-bone-broth/

I buy two whole chickens and then use the bones from the two to make the broth. I freeze any extra broth.

It is very soothing when my stomach is upset.

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Lymetoo
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You can also buy some chicken necks to add to it.. more bones.

It's best to use organic chicken.

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jennyfromtheblock
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they say the feet too....I couldn't bring myself to do that.

I also have done beef broth as well.

They say it will also help heal your brain.

Also for your stomach, try cooking your foods in a crock pot. The more you break down the tissues the easier it is to digest

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canefan17
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Wow 24 hours?
Posts: 5394 | From Houston, Tx | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Phoiph
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You definitely want to keep the "gel".

The broth also assists the body in producing stomach acid, enzymes, and kick starts digestion in general...(it is actually good for both acid reflux, and low stomach acid) so "grumbling" may be a sign of this process in action...

Because the broth alone is very rich, when you fist start eating it, try adding a little filtered water to the portion you are heating up...

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canefan17
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Why couldn't tap water be used if it's going to be boiled water anyways?


Does anyone pour spring water into the pot?

Posts: 5394 | From Houston, Tx | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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