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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Ascorbate and Antibiotics together killing bacterial infections !!

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Author Topic: Ascorbate and Antibiotics together killing bacterial infections !!
springshowers
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Read this.. .. and there is much more about Vitamin C on this site that refer to other benefits.

http://www.orthomed.com/titrate.htm


BACTERIAL INFECTIONS

Ascorbic acid should be used with the appropriate antibiotic. The effect of ascorbic acid is synergistic with antibiotics and would appear to broaden the spectrum of antibiotics considerably. I found that penicillin-K orally or penicillin-G intramuscularly used in conjunction with bowel tolerance doses of ascorbic acid would usually treat infections caused by organisms ordinarily requiring ampicillin or other more modern synthetic penicillins. Cephalosporins were used in conjunction with ascorbic acid for staphylococcus infections. The combination of tetracycline and ascorbate was used for nonspecific urethritis; however, patients who had previously repeated recurrences of nonspecific urethritis found they were free of the disease with maintenance doses of ascorbate. I am not sure that the tetracycline was necessary even in the acute cases, but it was used for legal reasons. Some other cases of unknown etiology such as two cases of Reiter's disease and one case of acute anterior uveitis also responded dramatically to ascorbate.

A most important point is that patients with bacterial infections would usually respond rapidly to ascorbic acid plus a basic antibiotic determined by initial clinical impressions. If cultures subsequently proved the selection of antibiotic incorrect, usually the patient was well by that time.

In the case of a 45-year-old man who had developed osteomyelitis of the 5th metacarpal of the right hand following a cat bite, a partial amputation of the hand had been recommended and surgery scheduled. Consultants agreed. The patient delayed surgery and signed himself out of the hospital. He was given intravenous ascorbate 50 grams a day for 2 weeks. The infection resolved rapidly. While this patient had destruction of the distal end of the metacarpal, there has been no recurrence of the infection (25).

This case illustrates the frequent problem of an indolent infection with an organism non-responsive to the most sophisticated antibiotic treatment which then may respond rapidly to treatment with intravenous ascorbate.

Treating simultaneously with the appropriate antibiotic plus ascorbate has the additional advantage that if, unexpectedly, the infection is actually viral, the infection will be suppressed and the incidence of allergic reaction to the antibiotic reduced.

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LizaLu
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I drink several cans of V8 juice which is high in Vitamin C and salt. It's safe and it gives me a little energy too.

Does the ascorbate they mention do the same thing as ascorbic acid (vitamin c)?

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Amanda
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I had read this before, espcially for the tetracyclines.

the one exception is if you are taking flagyl, vitamin c and e in small quantities can reduce the effectiveness of flaygl by about 40%. I don't know if this also applies to tindamax, but given that they are in the same drug class, I wouldn't chance it.

--------------------
"few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" - Mark Twain

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coltman
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50 gr/ day is a lot lol. Having IV every day is very expensive as well
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springshowers
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How about doing your own IV Vitamin C treatments. There are directions on line that are very detailed on how to prepare them.

I think the normal amount for the IVs you buy is 60 grams if I am not mistaken.

I also read that you have to take a certain amount and at that point it goes from being an antioxidant to being an oxidant therapy..?

Do not quote me on that. just from my memory.

And that is what I remember as part of why it works as well as I read at high dosages kills off bacteria and infections

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Hopeful2010
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Hi Springshowers!

Very interesting. Can you by IV Vitamin C without a prescription? If so how does one go about doing that?

Cheers

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springshowers
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Yeps.. you can..


http://www.allhealthtrends.com/sodium-ascorbate-2.2lb.html

This is a medical grade product with no fillers or preservative or additives....

"NutriBiotic Sodium Ascorbate is manufactured by dissolving pharmaceutical grade ascorbic acid with sodium bicarbonate (derived from sea water). It is a fully reacted, truly buffered form of vitamin C.

Sodium ascorbate has long been the vitamin C used to supplement many foods, intravenous infusions and by those desiring an economical, non-bitter, fully reacted non-acidic vitamin C product.

The sodium in this product differs from common table salt in that it is not combined with chloride, the "salt" most often associated with hypertension. Each gram (1000 mg) of vitamin C activity from Nutribiotic Sodium Ascorbate provides only 120 mg of sodium.

Contains no fillers, excipients, lubricants, binders, starch, wheat, soy, milk, egg, yeast, rose hips, animal products, colorings, flavorings or preservatives."

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springshowers
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I have been on the hunt now for various things to buy without scripts.

I have found Ringers Solution, Liquid Glutithione, liquid Vitamins, The ascorbate acid, MMS, All of which are appropriate for IM or IV usage..

Those are all things you can do via IV or IM and have instructions online how to do so ...or the companies send you detailed instruction on how to administer to yourself.

But I am not advising anyone to do this on your own by any means.

I though feel we all can make our own choices....

I would not tell anyone else what to do or try by any means.

But I co not mind sharing my sources if you want to PM me..

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coltman
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I dunno recent IV I tried nurses had real trouble setting it up (they could hit the vein no prob but there was no flow -so they tried like 6 times with no success on surface and ended up using invisible vein - I seriously doubt my capability to do it myself)

Plus preparing sterile solution for IV is time consuming and again not something I would be comfortable doing in my room (in a house infested with mice and bedbugs and anti sanitary roommates)

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springshowers
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Oh Coltman.. Mice Bedbugs and roommates.. What a mix.. LOL

I have a Port.. so that makes it easier... Much..

There are step by steps instructions on Vitamin C IVs solutions and they write that because of the solution being so strong that it kills a ton off on contact which makes it easier to keep things sterile.

As well.. If you have not been taught by a nurse how to infuse and be sanitary and do not have the supplies or training.. No.. not a good idea..

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springshowers
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up for reference.. to other post
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springshowers
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Up for reference to other thread
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Rumigirl
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Spring,

Be careful. First of all, if the supplies weren't specifically prepared for IV use under sterile conditions that could be quite dangerous. Secondly, I would be wary about doing IV without any guidance from a doctor. And preparing any IV stuff yourself is possible, but if you aren't really careful, it could lead to infections.

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