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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » MAJOR NEWS FOR SOUTHERNERS WITH LYME

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Author Topic: MAJOR NEWS FOR SOUTHERNERS WITH LYME
Bugg
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MAJOR NEWS FOR THOSE LIVING WITH LYME IN THE SOUTHEAST U.S. WHO ARE TOLD "YOU CANNOT CONTRACT LYME DISEASE AND LIVE IN THE SOUTH":


Tackett, Kristina, "The Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi,
in Tick Species Collected from Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Opossums
(Didelphis virginiana) Trapped in the Warren and Barren Counties of
South Central Kentucky" (2009). Masters Theses. Paper 118.

http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/118

Publication Date: 12-2009

Advisor(s) - Committee Chair:
Dr. Cheryl Davis (Director), Dr. Nancy Rice, Dr. Rodney King

Degree Program: Department of Biology

Degree Type: Master of Science

Abstract

The incidence of tick-borne zoonoses such as Ehrlichiosis, Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever, and Lyme disease has steadily increased in the
southeastern United States in recent years. According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the southeastern states accounted
for 1,200 of the 27,000 total cases of Lyme disease reported in the U.S.
in 2007. Although Ixodes scapularis is the most commonly recognized
vector for the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, Dermacentor
variabilis (a common vector for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever) also has
been shown to be a viable host for this pathogen. The purpose of the
present study was to use PCR and DNA sequencing technologies to
determine if Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is present in ticks and
whole blood samples removed from raccoons and opossums trapped in
south-central Kentucky.

Raccoons and opossums were trapped in Barren and Warren counties of
Kentucky between June 2007 and June 2008. Ticks were removed and stored
in 70% ethanol. Sterile blood samples were collected into three 10 ml
tubes containing the anticoagulant K2EDTA and stored at 4C. Genomic DNA
was extracted from ticks and blood samples using a QIAamp DNA mini kit
and a QIAamp DNA blood mini kit (Qiagen) respectively. DNA samples were
analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of B.
burgdorferi using oligonucleotide primers specific for the OspA gene.

A total of 976 ticks were collected. Three different species were
obtained from raccoons; Dermacentor variabilis, Amblyomma americanum,
and Ixodes sp. Dermacentor variabilis was the only tick species found on
opossums. Twenty-five percent (163/642) of the tick DNA samples were
positive for Borrelia burgdorferi. Prevalence of B. burgdorferi by tick
species was 24.4% (141/577) in D. variabilis, 40.6% (13/32) in A.
americanum, and 27.6% (8/29) in I. scapularis. In the present study,
15.7% (8/51) of the total raccoon blood samples examined by PCR were
positive for B. burgdorferi, while no opossum blood samples were
positive. The high prevalence of B. burgdorferi in ticks common to
raccoons and opossums observed in this study, as well as in a tick
species that aggressively bites humans in the southeast U. S. (A.
americanum), creates concern that there are ample opportunities for
people to come in contact with the infected ticks on these animals.
Future studies are urgently needed to fully assess the presence and
prevalence of B. burgdorferi in Kentucky and other southeastern states
in the U. S.

http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/118

Interested readers can download the entire 35.61 MB file:
http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1118&context=theses


__._,_.___

Posts: 1155 | From Southeast | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sutherngrl
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Thanks for this info.

I was one of the many that was told by my doctor that we don't really have LD in MS.

Posts: 4035 | From Mississippi | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
levity101
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Thanks for posting this. Importantly, it shows the presence of Bb in ticks other than Ixodes sp. as well as showing infection in mammals in the Southeast. Great work.

After dealing with Lyme disease in my son for over 10 years, my husband was bitten by a Lone Star (A. americanum) tick last year on our property in north Florida and contracted Lyme.

I had heard that the Lone Star ticks were very aggressive, not passive like others which simply grasp hosts as they brush past. I saw this first hand after placing the tick, which I had pulled off my husband, in a plastic bag to send off for testing. Only minutes after setting the bag down on my dresser the tick had chewed its way out of the bag. I began frantically searching the furniture and floor around it with a flashlight--then I felt something on my ankle...amazingly, it was the tick. I never dreamed they could move that fast and hone in on a target!

The fact that these aggressive ticks are carrying Lyme means that people should be even more vigilant in doing tick checks after being outdoors.

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sapphire101
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Thanks for posting this. I read this a few days ago and thought it's about time they recognize this.

Last summer my sister-in-law was in Vanderbilt hospital in Nashville. She was presenting like she could possibly have lyme and I mentioned it to her dr.

He said no that there isn't lyme in TN. I just wanted to laugh in his face and then smack him.

They couldn't figure out why she couldn't walk and could barely put a sentence together. When she went they knew she had fluid on her brain but yet said that wasn't causing her probs. They wanted to put her in a mental institute.

So sad but she did end up in a nursing home for a while till hubby finally talked a dr into putting in a shunt. Guess what happened? Yep, she walked and talked just like normal.

Sorry to get off topic but lyme isn't the only disease where the drs don't know what they are doing. You would think Vanderbilt would know about lyme and the sx of fluid on the brain.

My blood boils when I think what she went through and what so many of us go through because of such ignorance.

By the way, I live in Barren County where the ticks were collected. Sadly, there isn't very many here with lyme. Maybe I should say, that know they have lyme. There are so many people I know with the fibromyalgia dx. Including my best friend but she won't even think about that it could be lyme. [Roll Eyes]

Sapphire

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Sick Tick
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OH!!!! Please, someone inform the ID in Arkansas who told me there are no ticks in Arkansas that transmit Lyme!

My tick gave me Lyme and RMSF. It was a Lone Star tick in the Ozarks. I had the little bugger in a bag, so I KNOW what did it!

The dumb MD even had my CDC and anyone-with-a brain positive titers and western blot in front of him!

Posts: 283 | From where the ticks are! | Registered: Oct 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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My Lyme came from a Lone Star tick... in the Lone Star State!

Oh yes, they move FAST! I had hundreds on my legs the first day we went out to our inherited propery when I was a kid. Everything was downhill from there.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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map1131
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I'd also received this abstract and I live in Kentucky. Infected about 2 counties over in '98.

I tried to find an email address of this lady because I have some additional questions for them. I'm sure this article didn't cover everything they found in the belly of these ticks.

I'd like to know which type bartonella was found? Babesia? Information that would be real helpful to all of us infected nearby.

Any ideas how to make contact with those researchers?

Pam

--------------------
"Never, never, never, never, never give up" Winston Churchill

Posts: 6449 | From Louisville, Ky | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bugg
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Sapphire-Yes, Vanderbilt's ignorance regarding this disease is astounding...Please mail a copy to the doctor who told you there's no lyme in this area...

Pam-You might try contacting the committee chairs who are listed at the top of the abstract and they may put you in touch with the researcher....I'm sure they are listed in WKU's Directory if you call...Good luck....

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sapphire101
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Bugg, good idea except I don't remember his name. I sure would love to though. It amazes me how ignorant some drs can be.

Everyone around here think if you go to Vanderbilt you are in good hands. I have absolutely no faith in them.

Sapphire

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Karen Mc
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Thanks for info....

Yeah, I live in Va and in case any of the "so called Doctors" don't believe in Lyme here...come give me a visit.


IM LIVING (so far-lol) proof!!!!

Karen [Smile]

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sutherngrl
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I think most doctors play dumb regarding lyme disease and try their best NOT to learn much about it. They don't want to get caught up in the contriversy; and the less they know, the less guilt they feel for not treating us.
Posts: 4035 | From Mississippi | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pinelady
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LOL Sorry I did not mean to cross post. I did not see it as KY. related till now. Gonna leave it for other dummies like me. LOL But hey we can send it out to our local papers....

Here is the Honors site if you would like to send a note of encouragement and thanks.

http://www.wku.edu/honors/

[ 12-19-2009, 11:03 PM: Message edited by: Pinelady ]

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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