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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » My Dr. passed out TWICE while inserting PICC!!

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Author Topic: My Dr. passed out TWICE while inserting PICC!!
kareamber
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I mentioned this in another post, but thought I'd post a seperate post on it. I kind of want to get some input here and if I should do anything about what happened.

So I went into the military hospital here to have my PICC line put in on Wed. It was being done by the Radiologist in the Operating Room.

They do the Ultrasound to find the vein, etc... then numb me up and he inserts the wire. When he went to put the Catheter in they realize they have the wrong kit and the catheter is too small for the wire. Would've been an easy fix if they had a larger Catheter or different kit. Well for some stupid reason this was the LAST kit in the entire hospital and they didn't have access to another one!! (would've thought they should've made sure their supplies and etc.. were correct before beginning surgery) So they are all brainstorming on what to do and tried different things that didn't work... Then out of nowhere I felt the dr. lay on my lap. At first I thought maybe he was bent over looking at the ultrasound/xray screen on the opposite side of me, but then I felt dead weight and then he collapsed!!! And when he went down he had a hold of the wire and part catheder that was hanging out of my arm. It pulled my arm and hurt like crazy!!

Everyone rushed over to him and about 30 seconds later he came to. It was so weird cause he continued his conversation that he was having when he passed it out. It was almost like he didn't know it had happened! But he was acting weird..

I was so scared! I was for sure they'd take him out of there to evaluate him, but they didn't!! He continued and went back to messing with my line!

I was so nervous and was watching him carefully and a min or two later I saw his eyes roll back and started shutting and I literally yelled, "he's gonna do it again!!" And sure enough he passed out again! Again yanking my arm. Again he came to and they sat him down for a minute. He got back up and took of his mask and hat and was touching my arm again. I was not comfortable!!

Then the other dr took everything out of my arm and they said they couldn't do it because they didn't have the correct kit. The dr that passed out was standing by my bed and kept apologizing and he had TONS of sweat dripping of his face. Definately not STERILE!

So after all that I didn't even get my PICC line. Now, don't get me wrong I Feel VERY sorry for this dr and he was a very nice guy, but the more I think about it the more upset I get. WHY did they let him continue my procedure after the first incident!!?? He could've really hurt me and was DEFINATELY not in the condition to do it!!

Also I know that everything has to be very sterile and he fell to the floor twice touching the floor among other things with his hands and he didn't wash or change gloves before carrying on. He also was wiping the sweat off his face! UGH!

My arm is all bruised up and sore. I'll be SO mad if I get an infection.

My mom is a nurse and says I should talk to someone about it and that is not accepatble. But this hospital is treating me with the IV rocephin and I don't want to stir up issues.

What would you all do? Should I be upset, or should I let it go? It was kind of trumatizing. I couldn't sleep that night and I still can't stop thinking about it. It was scary, and SO WEIRD!

I ended up going to a different civilian hospital and got the PICC line yesterday. I had my first infusion this afternoon.

WHAT SHOULD I DO???

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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sixgoofykids
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Wow, unbelievable! I don't know what you CAN do.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

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TerryK
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Wow, I'm so sorry you had to go through that. I would have been scared too. The OR staff should have stopped him the first time he fainted. He was obviously disoriented and not making good decisions. Personally, I blame the OR staff since the doctor was not in the right frame of mind to make a reasonable decision.

Realistically, knowing how my brother has been treated at the VA hospital when he complained about one of his doctors, I'd be very careful since you want their cooperation. OTOH, It goes against everything I believe to let that kind of behavior go without comment.

You may want to ask the military lyme group what they recommend.

Terry

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Keebler
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-
Oh, my. I sincerely do have empathy for you and it must have been a horrible experience (yet, sorry, you are such a good story teller - and with my experience with all this - some chuckles did bubble up).

I probably have a far different reaction than others will. As someone who has passed out probably over a couple thousand times (over about 10 year time span) - it happens.

Doctors are human, too. And sometimes they also pass out. There are many reasons for this and it may be a kind of seizure (and anyone - anyone - can have a seizure now and then).

This might have been the first time (or two) for him and he may have really thought he'd be fine after coming back around. Why is it when someone hits the ground, though, they just don't stay there for little while? Everyone always wanted me to get right back up and the medical people were the worst about that.

As distressing as this was, as long as there is no cost incurred by you (they should not bill you for anything) . . . I would just chalk it up to being at the wrong place at the wrong time.

As least he didn't loose his lunch. I may sound more casual about this as I've just had so much experience. Once, my cane hit someone when I fell. I couldn't help it. It just happened. We're all human.

But, all that said, I would be curious to know if this was just a one-time thing for this doctor. If he's passing out as many times as I used to, he should do his job in a high backed chair - and you'd deserve more than just an apology. My guess is he was just as surprised as you and he probably really thought he'd be okay the second time around.

The brain really does think all will be well. It's amazing. I'd pass out and get right back up, "I'm fine, I'm fine. Sorry, so sorry" and then try to pretend nothing ever happened.

Maybe he learned from this and will be a far better doctor now. I would think he would have at least sent you a personal note but that may not be allowed.

While TerryK is right in that someone else should have taken over for him, and also assisted him out of the room . . . you were not injured so an official complaint would not exactly be needed. Not sure how to be certain this is under control but I would think the matter has been noted by staff, as they don't want a repeat faint.

I will say, it is absolutely humiliating to pass out in front of others. But then when seizures started, that pretty much trumpted that. My guess is the doctor is very embarrassed but he should still send you a box of the very best dark chocolate on the planet!

My guess is that if you need to have this doctor ever again, he will be extra careful to see you are treated as a head of state. Humor will go a very long way here. You really had an "Oy, Vey!" kind of day.
-

[ 03-05-2010, 05:09 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Topaz
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Oh my gosh, that's so weird!

I'm glad you got your PICC line in.

As for what you should do, geez that's a tough one.

I guess I'd want to mention it to someone just to make them aware that things were not being handled properly and that you felt uncomfortable.

I don't think I'd do anything more than that or make a huge deal of it though.

I'd mention it more in a concerned way, hoping it won't happen again as it was very unpleasant and stressful for you.

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kareamber
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Thanks for the advice.

I overheard him and his assistant after the procedure outside my dressing room door talking about it. He said that has NEVER happened before.

Is it possible that he was over stressed about not having the right equipment etc... and couldn't handle the stress? Or maybe it was a seizure? Kinda makes me wonder since he kinda resumed as if nothing happened.. Heck if I know.

I don't blame him. It wasn't his fault. He couldn't help it. But I am not happy that they allowed him to contiune and also that they didn't evaulate him or take him out? Very unprofessional.

I think I'll talk to my GP about it. She doesn't work at that hospital, but did refer me to have treatment done there. She's very nice and helpful and I think she'd be able to help me or get answers.

Keebler, somehow my hubby and I were giggling about it today too. As Traumatizing as it was, it was in some weird way humorous. My husband keeps making fun of me for saying "he's doing it again!!" But I had too!! I was the only one that was obviously concerned and watching him like an EAGLE! Maybe he has narcolepsy!! Maybe he needs my Provigil! Geez...

Weird weird...

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IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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Keebler
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-
Well, if you heard him say that's NEVER happened before - my guess is he was in shock and the adrenaline rush gave him a false sense of confidence. Really, he probably thought it was just a one time surprise.

My guess is that he's attending to the issue, then. Hope it was just one blip on his screen - maybe he forgot to eat breakfast - or just blanked out like Marie Osmond on "Dancing with the Stars" - she went back to work and danced like a professional. She never hit the ground again.

You really do tell a good story. "He's doing it again!" - I'm ROTFLMAO - did I get that right?
-

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kareamber
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I think your right. He probably thought he could brush it off and continue on. Maybe he thought no one noticed?!! ha.. hardly.

Oh the JOYS of treating lyme disease! [Smile]

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IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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sickpuppy
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Not to joke, but maybe he has lyme. As Keebler said, doctors get sick too and sometimes things just hit out of the blue. If you're a doc in surgery--not so good--if you're an office worker at a computer--not such a big deal.

I'm sorry you had such a bad experience.
I hope you go infection free and everthing works out.

Maybe you can talk with the management, not as a rat but with concern so that the guy gets some help and doesn't just blow it off somehow. Wouldn't want that to happen to another patient, ya know?

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kareamber
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I think your right. He probably thought he could brush it off and continue on. Maybe he thought no one noticed?!! ha.. hardly.

Oh the JOYS of treating lyme disease! [Smile]

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IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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glm1111
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kareamber,

I was hestitant in answering your post because I didn't want you to think I was not empathetic. I agree with keebler about your writing style.

I am sorry you were traumatized, but the way you described it had me laughing hysterically out loud holding my sides.

I am a retired trauma nurse and we used to refer to these kind of incidents as war stories.

I agree however, that they should have been prepared with the proper kit for the line. Hope things improve and thanks for the laugh.

Have you ever considered writing?

Gael

--------------------
PARASITES/WORMS ARE NOW
RECOGNIZED AS THE NUMBER 1 CO-INFECTION IN LYME DISEASE BY ILADS*

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sickpuppy
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Oh the joys indeed!!!!
[Smile]

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BugBarb
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I had a sleep study and told the tech I was allergic to adhesives. He told me nobody ever had problems with this stuff. I was like ok, you know what you're doing....
Needless to say, I had my husband take pictures of where the adhesive had been on my neck.
BRIGHT RED patches..I mean like two by three inches and another one a bit smaller.
Right up front, visible to the whole world.
I am allergic to adhesives!
I brought those pictures in to my next sleep study....
They were horrified and treated me like a queen and offered me a free repeat of the first study.
I declined since I hate them with a passion.

so

I would get someone to take pictures of your arm.
Print them up and bring them with you to your next hospital visit.
Show the doctor who did it to you, the full result of his actions.
You at least deserve a really big apology and an explanation.

--------------------
Lyme is like the flu. You can get it and recover, but you can always get it again.

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kareamber
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Gael,
Well I'm happy it made you laugh:) Laughter is the best medicine, so maybe you can skip that next dose of abx now? hehe... if only it were that easy, huh?
The whole situation has got me confused... it is so strange... I seriously don't know if I should laugh or cry?! I prefer to laugh, so maybe I'll just take it with a grain of salt and pray that it doesn't happen to some other poor soul.

Oh, and yes I have considered writing...possibly children's books? [Wink]

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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kareamber
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BugBarb,
Good idea on taking a picture of the bruised hole in my arm! I really don't want to make the Dr embarassed though. He was so nice, and I know felt bad. I think I do blame the OR team more so than him, and also the fact that they didn't have the correct kit or supplies. What a waste! The procedure was only supposed to take like 30 mins and I was in there FOREVVVVVVVVVVEEEEEERRRR!!

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IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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sutherngrl
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First of all I am so sorry you went through that. What a horrible experience!

I think it was completely unprofessional for them to let him try again. It was unsanitary and no one should attempt any surgical procedure immediately after fainting.

What a crazy situation from start to finish!

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Keebler
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Kareamber:

" . . . seriously don't know if I should laugh or cry?!"

Both. Alternate. There's room for ALL your emotions. I just always hope laughter has the last word.
-

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maps
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I am so sorry this happened to you, i have no idea how you managed to let him touch you again after pulling on your line and lying on you.

I think I must be wierd or perhaps because i am getting a picc line on tuesday but your experience has totally freaked me out.

I think you have a right to all those feelings, fear, anger, shock, disgust (maybe laughter would come later). You were in an environment where they should have been taking care of you not you having to look out for the doctor.

I would also want to know what happened and why the others covered up for him.

Just think if my appointment on tuesday was going to be at the same hospital and doctor and the same thing happened. It makes me feel queezy just thinking about it.

In answer to your question I don't know what I would do. If i knew that i maybe would not get my lyme treatment anywhere else i guess i would stay quite.

I truly hope that you will not get any kind of infection.

--------------------
1999 CFS, 2002 CMV Myco pneumonia
1 year antibiotics on and off
2002 EBV, 2009 Positive Igenex Borellia and Babesia, Brain mri severe white matter disease
Monoclonal Gammopathy. On and off antibiotics since sept. March 9 started iv antibiotics

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LightAtTheEnd
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I'm horrified that such a thing could happen, and that the other staff could just stand there watching while the doctor tried to continue after fainting the first time.

I remember a lecture class in college when a diabetic professor had an attack of low blood sugar.

He was lecturing away, when suddenly he started talking in circles, not making any sense. Most of the students did not know he was diabetic nor recognize that he was having a blood sugar attack.

(Some were probably not paying attention at all and may not have even noticed anything, haha.)

This was a professor who was always very dignified and in control, and highly respected for his extensive experience and expertise.

125 people sat and watched in shocked silence for several minutes, unsure what was happening or what to do, as the professor got worse and didn't realize it was happening to him.

Eventually, one of his graduate student assistants recognized his condition, went up to him and helped him to a chair and gave him something to eat.

He came around and was okay within a few minutes.

When someone in authority suddenly has an unexpected health problem, subordinates may be caught off guard and unsure what to do, especially if they are not aware that the person is ill.

I have seen this happen with epileptic seizures before, where people nearby did not recognize that the person was having a seizure, and stood there watching uncertainly for a few minutes before someone figured out what to do.

Though you would think that hospital staff would recognize a health problem as obvious as losing consciousness and falling on top of the patient.... (okay, I did have to chuckle a bit at the absurdity of it).

--------------------
Don't forget to laugh! And when you're going through hell, keep going!

Bitten 5/25/2009 in Perry County, Indiana. Diagnosed by LLMD 12/2/2009.

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kidsgotlyme
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kareamber- I'm really sorry about what happened, but I have to agree with Keebler. I can just "see" you laying there yelling "He's going to do it again!" [Big Grin]

I pray that everything goes alright and no harm was done.

Christie

--------------------
symptoms since 1993 that I can remember. 9/2018 diagnosed with Borellia, Babesia Duncani, and Bartonella Hensalae thru DNA Connections.

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Tincup
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OH MY!!!

I'd have ben horrified too at the time.. but I also am guilty of laughing at the picture you painted when telling the story.

I am sorry this happened.. and I do hope you are ok.. but GEEZE!

What kind of luck is that? Not once, but twice?

My thought is to NOT pay the bill for that day.

I have a friend who went for stent surgery for their heart attack and after getting everything ready and opening them up... they realized they did not have a stent.

Talk about a bad deal! They had to go through the surgery again the next day!!!

And YES, you'd think they would check their equipment to be sure they had what they needed BEFORE doing a procedure or surgery.

I do hope you are ok.. and so sorry about the arm.

Maybe this means you'll have better luck with the IV's?

I hope so!!!!

[Big Grin]

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
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www.LymeDoc.org

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IckyTicky
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Unless you get an infection, I'd let it go as far as the doctor is concerned. Certainly not his fault.
As for the staff not taking him off the job immediately I think I'd have a discussion with their superior for not stopping him.

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IGM: 18+, 23+, 30+, 31+++, 34+, 39IND, 41++, 58+++, 66+, 83-93IND
IGG: 31+, 39IND, 41+
Also positive for Mycoplasma Pneumoniae and RMSF.
Whole family of 5 dx with Lyme.

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Keebler
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-
I've been around a lot of people who just froze when I'd pass out or have a seizure. Even doctors and nurses. Sometimes, they are the worst. Of course for the first few seconds, I'm out of it but as soon as I stir, often, even medical people have just been stunned.

I thought it was mostly because they just could not believe me but I've seen this in others who pretty much understood and they can freeze, too.

You'd like to think medical people think fast on their feet (when they can stay on their feet) but it's not like a TV show. Yes, they should have managed this with style, grace and expertise (my trio wish list) but it could be that they were all also in shock.

It seems odd, though, that in the hospital training, they've not thought out what to do if any one person (or even more) suddenly faints. It does happen.

At the time I was passing out so much, I really just could not understand how a person could even actually walk across the street upright and get to the other side okay. It was like I was on another planet with my alien body wondering just how they stayed upright.

So, my take is a bit different but my guess is that shock - or disbelief - from medical people when I've passed out in their presence has actually been worse than around most others without medical knowledge.

"Well, THAT's not supposed to happen" was the frequent response in medical settings.

* I had one nurse who literally bolted through a door, causing me to seize but the instant before I passed out as I rocketed out of my chair, I saw the shocked look on his face.

When I came to, I started laughing, uncontrollably. And then I cried, sobbing uncontrollably. Later, I learned all that had still been part of the seizure process. But, as he saw my laughing, he wanted me to get up right away off the floor and get back into my chair. I needed to stay down on the floor for the health of my brain.

As a nurse, he should have known better but had no clue what to do and keep me horizontal for a while. But he was in shock himself as he did not expect what he got when he crashed through the door. I must have been half way to the ceiling. I will always remember that split instant flick of a switch and the look on his face and can now laugh about that one part.

The thing is that, because of this problem, I had asked that hospital for quiet place to lie down after an EEG while waiting for a taxi. But they denied me that, even though there was an empty little conference room right there. I had found a quiet office waiting room where I though I'd be out of the way. Ooops.

(Icing on the gluten-free cake: EEG was said to be normal. But the tech said they had to throw out most of it because they'd never seen anything like that before and the machine must have been broken. Hah. I was broken.)

* I've had even a former ER doctor - turned ND and L. AC. - who just stared after I smashed to the floor when the furnace kicked on (I did not know that my chair was directly over that part of the furnace that did the actual "kick-start") . . . he never helped me recover at all, after a long time of tonic/clonic stuff that took all the life out of me.

(Well, to me it was a long time. Seemed like 30 minutes but it was probably only one or two.) But it would be another 30 minutes before I could speak. He didn't even help me to my feet or to the acupuncture table - or offer any remedy or relief. None.

It was as if I had just peed on his ficus tree. He just stared. Don't think that would have been shock given his ER experience, but something about that was all wrong. It cost me $400. for that introductory appointment for whom I thought would be a LL ND (No LLMDs in my state). I still had to pay even though I "went flying" just 5 minutes into an hour appt and was toast the rest of the time.

That was the very last of the money I had to see LL doctor of any kind. My whole life rested on information I had hoped to gather in that appointment. And it (money and hope) was gone in a flash.

Obviously, I never went back. He said he had other lyme patients who recovered but (even before I spazed) he would not tell me one solid detail. I was up front, saying I wanted an information appointment. If he could not help me recover even from a seizure, I would have hated to have seen him in an E.R.

(Oh, but wait, other doctors have been just as bad in the E.R. - but that was just mean, stemming from their disbelief, not shock.)

* Another doctor, another time: after an appointment we happened to be eating lunch in the same small neighborhood diner. When someone dropped something, I also crashed to the floor right out of my chair. As I came to, no one had come around to help. Not one person. Not the doctor. I had seen him looking at me but he did not move.

Maybe people just don't get it - that a helping hand can be ever so nice. I'm not looking for attention. In fact, I'd just as soon disappear when this stuff happens. But, gee whiz, don't just be a deer in the headlights. If they all think THEY are in shock, they should see the inside of MY brain.

But, maybe medical people need to SEE what they are dealing with and passing out is just too mysterious to them. And, maybe they are just not "hands on" people.

Seriously, comfort and nurturing are foreign to many who work in medical settings. They don't know how to pick some one up - or how to hold their head until it's time to get up. Touching as medical care never occurs to them.

My comments are not intended to divert attention from the IV debacle but only to help shine light on other similar experiences in which people did not step up to the plate. I'm not sure it helps in understanding why but it might help to understand that it's not really so rare for people to drop the ball (or their boss).

I think many people don't get the complexity of physiological forces that occur with fainting and such. It's not as simple as it seems. "Proceed as normal" rarely works.
-

[ 03-06-2010, 05:17 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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kareamber
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Well I was thinking...don't they have to write some type of report on what happend during the procedure? If so, I'm sure the incident will be included in that...I hope so anyways. It was so weird... it's like they didn't really think it was a big deal or something.

I'm getting my IV infusions done everday at the same hospital. It's gonna be real awkward if I run into him...I hope it doesn't cause too much stress on him!! I'd hate to do "it" to him again! "OOPS! I did it Again"...

I am scheduled to have a MRI on the 8th, so I really may see him then. YIKES!

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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glm1111
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Keebler,

So sorry that you had to deal with all that insenitivity. Unfortunately it all comes down to common sense, and even people in the medical field do not always have that switch turned on.

I can relate to a lot of what you have said and having to save my own life literally from people in the medical field that didn't know what they were doing. It's truly scary.


OTOH, I have had medical personel save my life more than once. I encourage everyone to speak up if you think something is wrong with the care you are getting and not hold back.

Sorry, anyone has to deal with all of this on top of what we are already suffering,

Gael

--------------------
PARASITES/WORMS ARE NOW
RECOGNIZED AS THE NUMBER 1 CO-INFECTION IN LYME DISEASE BY ILADS*

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Keebler
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kareamber,

You will most likely receive excellent care if this same doctor treats you in the future. In fact, I'd rather have him as you know the ice has been broken and he owes you. He'll be good to work with, I'll bet. You can be sure he got the message and has taken action.

Just say you want to be sure he ate a good breakfast, make him smile and it'll be smooth skating from there. I might also suggest that his staff play a few hand-eye coordination games or that "trust" exercise to catch people. But that could come of badly if you don't have just the right delivery.

-

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Amanda
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Here is what you should do, to protect yourself, and others, from any future incidents, and if the PICC goes bad and it gets serious, you need to DOCUMENT what happened right away.

First, call teh Human resource department at the hospital, all have a "complaints department" and tell them everything that happened. You can be kind, and tell them you know that doctors are human, and that the doctor was apologetic, just like you described. But also make it clear that you were frightened, it caused you pain, and that because they did not have more supplies on hand, you had to come back on go through this again. Make sure you get the name of the person you spoke with in Human resources, and record the time and date you spoke with them.

Then, sit down and write a letter to that same person, telling them "thank you for hearing my concerns", and then recount everything you said to the human resources person. Say things like, "On Date X, and time Y, I spoke with you about the following event". Again, you can say you appreciated the doctors apologies, and that you know accidents can happen, but that you were frightened and in pain and concerned about unsafe medical practices. Not to mention that the hospital was not adequetly supplied, which also was a problem for you.

Sign the letter, make a copy, then send the original by CERTIFIED mail to the hospital, and request a signing signature. Keep the receipt from the post office.

I promise you, if you are polite, in combination with thouroughly documenting your case, the hospital will be too worried about getting sued to treat you badly afterwards.

If you do all these things, if you should (heaven forbid) get some serious infection that leads to the loss of your arm or something, you will have a solid legal case. Also, the hospital will make sure that this doesn't happend again.

I know its hard, because of course doctors are human too, but the fact is that MDs ARE RESPONSIBLE for recognizing they are unwell, and could cause more harm than good. I was scheduled for surgery once, and at the last minute the doctor said, "I am sorry, but I have a terribel cold right now, and I don't think its a good idea for me to open up your abdomen". Another MD can do the work, or they can do it later.

And trust me, there are probably a lot of nurses that were upset, but can't really do much unless some patients respectfully speak up.

I hope you are ok!

--------------------
"few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" - Mark Twain

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Carol in PA
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quote:
Originally posted by kareamber:
Well I was thinking...don't they have to write some type of report on what happend during the procedure?

It was so weird... it's like they didn't really think it was a big deal or something.

In my past experience, the staff writes up an "incident report," which is for the hospital's use only.

If something like this happens, the staff tries not to "make a big deal" about it.
That fuels the fire for sue-happy patients.

I have seen a couple times where the nurses did not think the doctor should be doing a procedure, but were unable to say anything, for fear of reprimand.
They need to know that the nursing supervisors will back them up.

This happened to me, when I did not have the experience and confidence to step in and tell the doctor what I thought.

When I was employed, I always carried an ammonia ampule, the kind in a fabric sheathe, that you break between your fingers.

I pulled it out and waved it beneath the patient's nose at the first sign of faintness.
When you're sick, it doesn't smell like ammonia, and it does help to revive you.

Carol

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kareamber
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I think I read something in the hospital today about "patient advocate" Maybe I could contact them about the incident?

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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Keebler
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Carol, too bad you weren't around with your fast thinking and magic ampule when I hit the dust so often.

I also recall another incident, after a doctor had behaved horribly, one nurse who whispered to me so kindly: "we're all just wired differently" - that helped me get through it after the doctor said such horrible things about me as if the seizures just could not be happening. I had even been transported there unconscious, not like I asked to go.

I will always remember that nurse and that, yes, "we're all wired differently."
-

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kareamber
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Thanks for the advice Amanda. Could I just go in and talk to Human Resources instead of calling?

I really don't want to get the dr in trouble, but I think you are right that I probably should do something in order to protect me in case of infection or something worse.

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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Keebler
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-
Yes, Amanda has good advice. Especially about the lack of supplies and the staff's slow reaction.

I would think you could go in and talk to an patient advocate - and they will make a written statement for you. Somehow, it has to be written up. If you write it, you know it will accurately detail your experience and the 2 or 3 major points for them to work on.

Or you might talk to the doctor and explain that it seems fitting that a proper statement be made to those in charge of overseeing supplies. To do so, the incident will be mentioned, sort of thing.

Amanda's post is nearly a template. You could cut and paste a great deal from that and nearly have your letter.
-

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kareamber
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Keebler,
Were your passouts and seizures all lyme related?
Sounds like you've had your fair share... I'm sorry, that must be so scary! I've never passed out, but been on the verge. Not a good feeling.

--------------------
IgeneX IGG POS 30+ 31++++ 41++
IGM 30+ 31+++ 34IND 41IND 83-93IND
Quest NEG IGG 30 and 41 only

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Amanda
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Sure, you could go in a speak to someone in person, any way that feels right for you.

I was also thinking that sometimes supply issues can be frustrating for the doctors, because someone in accounting or their business office may make decisions. By going to human resources, or pateint advocate, this information gets out to all branches of hospital operations.

But I would still make sure you send something in writing later

--------------------
"few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" - Mark Twain

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Keebler
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-
kareamber,

Yes, all lyme (and coinfections) related but some inner/middle ear abnormalities contribute. Those may or may not be lyme + co related.

It took many years to get a proper lyme + co. diagnosis (as no LLMD in my state) . . . as well, even long after many inner ear disorders were dx, it look years to get the precise CT scans of the bones in the inner/middle ear region that really made sense.

Magnesium deficiency and elevated mercury, and sudden blood pressure drops, etc. Celiac that went undiagnosed, too, likely contributed. Going gluten-free really helped.

Allicin and Andrographis, independently, are what has helped the most. But I still really don't get out much and have a long way to go. Hence, the name - a "Keebler" - probably have not had a cookie in over 20 years, but I would live in a tree in the forest if I could.

Good luck with your treatment. Hope you get way better soon.
-

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randibear
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hmm, wonder if your doc should be tested for lyme??

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

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seekhelp
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I always figured your real name was Keebler. [Smile]
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Keebler
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Maybe it is. What's really real?
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nefferdun
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What a story! When I was young we went to army doctors and they are not very good at all. I was scheduled for surgery to remove a "growth" in my wrist, which turned out to be a ganglion - just a water fill sack. It broke and disappeared before the surgery. You can hit them hard and they will break.

I am glad you got your line somewhere else. Maybe if you confront the military hospital they will pay for you to get it all done at the other hospital. That is ridiculous.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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grandmother
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I suggest you write the doctor a very kind sympathetic note and tell him you're concerned for his health and well-being.

Showing anger toward people who were well-meaning and sympathetic will not help you.

Someone else said it first. Doctors are human.

[group hug]

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