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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » MS study suggests key role of environmental factor in the disease April 28, 2010

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Author Topic: MS study suggests key role of environmental factor in the disease April 28, 2010
Pinelady
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http://www.physorg.com/news191667061.html
As far as what environmental factor(s) could be playing a role in multiple sclerosis, the scientists did not speculate in their paper.

The most prominent theory in the field is that a viral infection triggers the immune reactions that initiate the disease; Epstein-Barr virus is considered the most likely culprit.

If this were the case, each person's unique genetic make-up would influence the body's immune reactions and determine whether they would lead to the disease.

While no viral trigger for MS has been confirmed, several genetic risk factors have been identified.

Other current hypotheses include vitamin D deficiency

brought on by a lack of exposure to sunlight, and smoking.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sojourner
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Blah, blah, blah..........no kidding, it is not directly genetic. blah, blah, blah.....it is thought to be autoimmune. blah, blah, blah....Epstein Barr. Blah, blah, blah, tell us something we don't already know.

Ok......so about a million studies point to an environmental componenet, and YEARS ago MS looked an awful lot like an untreated syphillis infection, and now, MS looks an aweful lot like an untreated lyme infection buttttt, they always go down the autoimmune/viral trigger rabbit hole. Whatever!

Pinelady, thanks for posting this (my ire is not directed at you [kiss] ) just sick of all the seemingly worthless research that is conducted.

[ 05-01-2010, 05:46 PM: Message edited by: Sojourner ]

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Pinelady
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Scientists are reporting what they say is

compelling evidence that some powerful

non-heritable, environmental factor likely plays a

key role in the development of multiple sclerosis.

The good news is these neurologists and geneticists

are at last proving that they should look further.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pinelady
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http://www.physorg.com/news141568947.html

September 25, 2008

The *** majority *** of children vaccinated against hepatitis B are not at an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS),

according to a study to be published in the October 8, 2008, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.


The study based in France involved 349 children with MS and 2,941 children without the disease. The children were all under the age of 16. A total of 24.4 percent of the children with MS were vaccinated for hepatitis B in the three years before the study, compared to 27.3 percent for the children without MS.

Although the study found that hepatitis B vaccination does not generally increase the risk of multiple sclerosis, the children with MS were 1.74 times more likely to have received a certain type of hepatitis B vaccine, called Engerix B.

Those children with MS developed symptoms three or more years after the vaccine. The risk was only found for this specific type of hepatitis B

vaccine and not found for all vaccines against hepatitis B.

This association cannot be taken as confirmation that the vaccine caused MS. Further studies are

needed to determine whether this is a causal relationship.

Source: American Academy of Neurology


Just little pieces of puzzles they have to put together.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pinelady
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http://www.physorg.com/news189348613.html



New research explains repeated infection by some viruses
April 1, 2010

New research conducted at the Oregon Health & Science University Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute explains how a virus that has already infected up to 80 percent of the American population can repeatedly re-infect individuals despite the presence of a strong and long-lasting immune response.

The research involves cytomegalovirus (CMV), which infects 50 percent to 80 percent of the U.S. population before age 40.

Details of the new findings are printed in this week's online edition of the journal Science.

"CMV evades these alert systems by making genes that disrupt the MHC-I molecules' ability to communicate an ongoing infection to the T cells.

In essence, CMV is able to cutoff an infected cell's call for elimination. This allows CMV to overcome this critical immune barrier during

re-infection," explained Klaus Frueh, Ph.D., a senior scientist at the VGTI and a professor of molecular microbiology and immunology in the OHSU School of Medicine.


My question is- did they give them a Elisa and a

WB for Borrelia to be included in the research?

As it is capable of being maternally transmitted

these studies with today's knowledge of borrelia are worthless.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
massman
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Sojourner - did you mean Epstein Blah ? [Wink]

MS IMO is late stage Lyme.

Viruses are opportunistic and love injured areas.
Lyme injures then toxifies an area, THEN viruses move in, IMO.

But I suppose that is way too simple a concept for those high rolling "researchers".

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Pinelady
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This information could help down the line

identifying patients who can and should be treated

for these and other virus' to prevent syndromes

like RSD and others that are caused by virus' in

patients with Lyme=known or unknown.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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