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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Earplugs that really work..

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Author Topic: Earplugs that really work..
RZR
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is there such a thing? I have plugs that I got at Wally World in the sporting goods dept. Even with them in, I can still hear my husband snoring in another bedroom.

Any recommendations for earplugs that truly block out noise?

--------------------
Tick bite May 2009
Diagnosed June 2009

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Keebler
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-
Magnesium is your best supplement helper. Holy Basil (Tulsi), Scullcap or Milky Oat seed. Still, it is a tremendous challenge.

I have every type of ear plug on the market and a couple custom made pair. Still, from adjoining apartments, snoring breaks through my ear plugs.

If I move to the living room, my fridge vibration breaks through ear plugs, too.

With vibration, it's not always sound, itself, but the vibration stimulates the inner ear and that can deprive the brain of rest/sleep AND trigger nausea.

Often, I add a professional ear "muff" to be able to doze off but that really hurts my neck.

So, yes, even in another bedroom and, even with ear plugs, this is possible.

The white dense ear plugs work better than the bright orange ones.

Some suggest soft music but that keeps the brain awake. It's also not good to fall asleep to an iPod or to any electronic gadget anywhere near your head. Put a CD player across the room. But, still, even the most peaceful music stimulates the ear receptors at a time when you need them to be still.

A fan might work but, for most with lyme, the vibration can stimulate the inner ear through the body and cause nausea. I've tried all fans and sound atmosphere machines and the motor in every single one is just too much vibration for my ears. You may do better with that, though.

Noise cancellation headsets are not effective against snoring - except for a short time but the biggest concern there is that the electronic pulses of the headsets can actually increase tinnitus and it's just not good to use those unless absolutely necessary (as in traveling).

Having closets between the rooms helps, changing location of the beds, etc. Making changes in the insulation can help but can be extremely expensive and much more technical than one can imagine as all holes or leaks must be sealed.

Sound insulation can also be loaded with chemicals.

I've often thought of building myself a wood "tree house" enclosure in my bedroom but the design of a fresh air exchange has me stumped.

Can you build a sleeping pod anywhere else in your home?

* Has your husband seen an ENT to be checked for nasal polyps or other obstructions?

* Then, assessed by a sleep specialist for sleep apnea?

Throat exercises, even singing lessons, are seeing some success to help stop snoring. Some links to that approach were just posted last week to this thread:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP - Links to articles & supplements

=================

http://www.amazon.com/Quiet-Please-Foam-Ear-Plugs/dp/B001FXRIHE

Flents Quiet! Please Foam Ear Plugs

While far from perfect, this are the best I can find - but I do worry about the foam in the ears - it's all chemical. I have been able to put a thin tissue between my ear and the ear plug. Not sure if it would stop the chemicals from being absorbed into the ear but it does absorb sweat better than the foam.

A new pair every few days is best.

==========================

www.hyperacusis.net

Hyperacusis Network -

========================

Above, check out different kinds of ear plugs. There is one I have not yet tried. A band around the back of the head and ear plugs. Not sure how comfortable it would be for sleep - and if it could go around the front - but the way sound is blocked in that is supposed to be different. Here's that link:

http://www.sensgard.com/products-1

SensGard ZEM Hearing Protection

==========================

Also remember that sound travels though skin and bones, and your nose, too. We have to keep that open.

On a personal note, I hope your husband takes every possible measure to solve HIS snoring problem that so affects both his health and yours.

When I was married (long ago), I was shocked by the intensity of my new husband's snoring. He would do nothing about it. I begged him to see doctor many times over many years and he just would not.

Turns out, about ten years after our divorce we had a phone conversation when he was telling me of his upcoming marriage - and that (by the way) I had been correct about his snoring. He had a major cyst for a long time. It was removed and he no longer snored.

It not yet come to light at the time of our conversation but it turns out that (in addition to sound torture from lyme) I have a structural problem in my ear canals so vibration is intensified a million times for me. I'll come back with a link for that condition, SCD, as it should be considered for anyone who is abnormally affected by vibration.

As a condition, SCD has only been recently discovered. Many doctors have not heard about it and the tests for dx are extremely specific. Most imaging tests miss it.

Good luck.
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[ 06-01-2010, 03:52 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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sparkle7
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Yes... I know the snoring problem. For some reason, the snoring seems to make everything vibrate. I live with someone with sleep apnea. It's a bad combination when one has Lyme & insomnia & they live with someone with sleep apnea...

Usually, both people end up having sleep impairment when you live with someone with sleep apnea.

I read that playing a digeredoo is supposed to help with sleep apnea. (LOL)

I don't know about any earplugs. I don't like to sleep with them if I can help it. Keebler seemed to suss everything out. The fan does help a bit but I don't normally use it unless it's hot.

My significant other has a C-pap but he takes it off during the night. It must be hard to sleep with a mask on but there aren't alot of other options for sleep apnea these days.

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Keebler
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-
While ear sensitivities go hand in hand with lyme, excessive pain and nausea from vibration may indicate a more serious problem:

=============

Superior Canal Dehiscence -- ABC news VIDEO - nine minutes - on YOU TUBE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6vAkdGw8T4

SCDS - The Musician who heard too much

Adrian McLeish, musician

-------------

More links about SCD over here:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/65801

Tinnitus Thread
-

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Lymetoo
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If you have the money you can get some at a hearing center.

My husband uses the spongy ones. I get them at Walgreen's.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Hoosiers51
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I got some "nude"/beige colored ones at a Target store by the pharmacy. The brand is Mack's.

If you want to see what the box looks like, go to www.target.com and type in "ear plugs", and it is the first thing that comes up. It's a blue box.

The link was too long to post here.

Anyways, it is important you follow the package directions or they don't really work. Look at the diagram on the box. It's a little spongy thing, and you need to twist it tightly so it is narrow...

...then to put it in your right ear, take your left arm, reach over the top of your head, and pull the top of your right ear upwards (this straightens the ear canal), then insert the *tightly twisted up* earplug with your right hand.

The diagram on the box explains it.

If you put them in any other way, they don't work!

Hope that helps.

If you buy a brand that doesn't have that diagram, just try to use my directions.

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radfaraf
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Ear plugs are rated based upon how much noise they block. The best you will find is a rating of 33 NRR (noise reduction rating). To get any better you need big ear muffs or something simillar.

I have these which I like http://www.amazon.com/Hearos-Ear-Plugs-Xtreme-Protection/dp/B000NP79YM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1275421551&sr=8-3

I think walgreens and other drug stores carry them too.

As hoosiers also mentioned putting them in properly is extermely important. If put in wrong they will block very little noise.

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Keebler
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-
The higher the NRR rating, the better for the sudden bursts of volume that occur for some snorers if they can be rated by decibels rather than low-level vibration. Those kind of sudden bursts of volume, though, endanger the snorer's life and can lead to heart attacks.

However, the NRR rating has little to do with low-level vibration that simply can't be measured by decibels. Sadly, little - or sometimes nothing - can really block all levels of vibration that travels through our bones and sinus structure into our ear system.

Earplugs are designed to protect ears to lessen the impulse that reaches the ear nerves, not to induce silence. It's impossible, anyway, to totally block out sound. I sure wish it were and I have implored many ear specialists in my search.

You may want to buy several different types of ear plugs. What works best can be an individual response.

There are also the silicone blobs - like clear silly putty - by MACKS. I find they are not as helpful but I know someone who likes those best. She puts in a little piece of clean cotton ball first to absorb sweat. Here's a link to that type:

http://www.amazon.com/Maxi-Aids-Silicone-Ear-Plugs/dp/B0001AGMWY

MACKS Silicone ear plugs

=======================

To offset hours of tandem leaf blowers on the property, I tried making a full head helmet but my designs had a few construction challenges. By the way. For a test as just how pour foam is as a sound blocker, put a foam pillow up to a stereo speaker or a radio. The sound travels right through the foam.

So, the more dense the ear plug, the greater chance at some relief. The greater coverage is all around the ear, the better. That that is why the construction-quality muffs are better protection - just not comfortable for sleep - but if the headband can go under the chin, that works a bit better.
-

[ 06-01-2010, 04:57 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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RZR
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Very good info on inserting properly...I did not know this at all. I will look for the blue plugs.

Hubby won't do a darn thing about his snoring. I have begged him to talk to his doctor because I am worried about his health...he won't listen. This has been a problem for years.

--------------------
Tick bite May 2009
Diagnosed June 2009

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abigail
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I work the graveyard shift, and live in the suburbs, so let me tell you what has worked for me. The best ear plugs for me are EAR Ultrafit. They are yellow and look phalanged so you can really get them into your ears as opposed to many others. They have a blue cord they are attached to. I buy them on-line from the ear plug store at http://earplugstore.stores.yahoo.net/ul1pa.html I have also invested in a fan that works wonders. Good luck! Oh yeah, one more thing. Before I got the fan, I also bought a pair of those noise-reducing gunshot dealy bobs that look like headphones. I used to put them over top the inside-the-ear plugs. It is great for noise reduction but hard to roll over in bed. The fan has really worked out great for me. I haven't even had to use any plugs since I got it. Good luck again!

--------------------
Dying is easy. Living is harder.

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sammy
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When I have to travel I always bring along Mack's silicone ear plugs. (Like Keebler mentioned). They work the best for me. All the other ear plugs that I have tried don't fit and don't work well.

You can find Mack's silicone ear plugs in the pharmacy dept of most stores like Walmart and Target. They are pretty cheap and you can reuse the silicone balls a couple times.

My ears are small so I tear the silicone balls in half then mold them to fit into my ears. They work great for snoring and for keeping water out of your ears when swimming. They also stay in place all night. I just take them out in the morning and clean them off with an alcohol pad if I'm going to use them another night.

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sparkle7
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Thank for all the info. I didn't know about the insertion technique.

It's important to get the sleep apnea checked out. I know some men are stubborn about doctors (more men than women - I believe)... You can stop breathing when you are snoring. People die from it.

I've heard my DH stop breathing many times while having sleep apnea. It does really happen. It's hard to sleep with a mask but it does help when he keeps it on.

It's hard on everyone in the house. I can empathize.

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