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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Shakes and Tremors

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Author Topic: Shakes and Tremors
LymeMom Kellye
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My daughter has a new symptom and I can't find anything in the archives when I search.

Her hands are really shakey. She reminds me of my elderly grandmother the way they tremble. They're also weak.

Last week she started a new abx, Cefitn. LLND states that it crosses the blood/brain barrier. She has had 5 good days in a row, and it seems like this abx addition is helping, except for the tremor... [confused] [confused]

Has anyone had this symptom? Tonight she went dancing, yes DANCING!!! and she said her legs were really shakey...

Thoughts, Ideas? Thanks!

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kellephant
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this is a MAJOR problem for me! my hands shake so badly that sometimes i accidentally throw my hairbrush across the room... i am constantly spilling drinks of myself, and i always drop/knock things over. i have no idea how to solve the problem, but i definitely think it is a symptom.
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sammy
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I struggle with hand tremors also. It gets worse as I get more fatigued or if I'm herxing badly. I drop and spill things, have trouble griping silverware and holding pens to write. My arms and legs also get shaky if I'm tired.
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lymetwister
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You have to remember that Lyme affects the Central Nervous System. With that said, Tremors are a symptom of a screwed up CNS.

I have had them on and off over the last year or so. I would say they are worst for me upon awakening.

I also feel very nervous and anxious upon awakening and at some points during the day.

I attribute this to the disease and now also to treating the Lyme.

If you think about it, the Brain send signals to the rest of the body and regulates just about everything in our bodies. With that said, I personally believe that most symptoms associated with Lyme, not all, but most, are attributed to faulty signals originating from the brain.

Once the infection is cleared to a reasonable level, I believe these faulty signals are then corrected.

Of course, I can't back up any of this, but it does seem to make sense. Hope that helps.

Gary

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Keebler
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Ditto to Lymetwister: "You have to remember that Lyme affects the Central Nervous System. With that said, Tremors are a symptom of a screwed up CNS." end quote.

Adrenal hormones are probably all out of balance, too, as lyme really fries that whole system.

Magnesium (and maybe calcium) is likely dangerously low. Fish oil, too, is vital.

She may need more protein. And be sure glucose levels are stable. She may also need more complex carbohydrates to help keep blood sugar stable.
-

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Keebler
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Glad to hear that she was able to go out dancing. Her reaction indicates that she either overexerted herself &/or the sensory input was just too much for her adrenals, her nervous systems.

Here's are some self-care guidelines that your daughter may not have yet seen. The next time she goes dancing, she might be able to make some changes so that she can better enjoy the evening - and the days to follow.

As no alcohol can be consumed, she should make friends with the manager - even calling ahead - to be sure they will stock things she can drink: pomegranate juice with no added sugar is a good one. She can take a packet of STEVIA (from a plant source, not artificial) with her.

Bars usually have cranberry juice but it either has sugar, corn syrup or artificial sweeteners, none of which are acceptable.

She might even be able to take in her own beverage and tip them to keep it chilled for her and serve her as requested. They could add some sparkling water (but carbonated water should be in moderation).

================

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Dr. Burrascano's Treatment Guidelines (2008) - 37 pages

Joseph J. Burrascano, Jr., M.D.

* Page 27 for SUPPORTIVE THERAPY & the CERTAIN ABSOLUTE RULES

* Pages 31 - 32 for LYME DISEASE REHABILITATION and specifics in coordinating a rest / work-out schedule and Physical Therapy.

==========

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Treatment Guidelines, 16th edition, October, 2008
Joseph J. Burrascano, Jr., M.D.

Page 20:

. . . If treatment can be continued long term, then a remarkable degree of recovery is possible.

However, attention must be paid to all treatment modalities for such a recovery - not only antibiotics, but rehab and exercise programs, nutritional supplements, enforced rest, low carbohydrate, high fiber diets, attention to food sensitivities, avoidance of stress, abstinence from caffeine and alcohol, and absolutely no immunosuppressants, even local doses of steroids (intra-articular injections, for example). . . .


* Page 27 for SUPPORTIVE THERAPY & the CERTAIN ABSOLUTE RULES


Page 31:


LYME DISEASE REHABILITATION

Despite antibiotic treatments, patients will NOT return to normal unless they exercise, so therefore an aggressive rehab program is absolutely necessary. It is a fact that a properly executed exercise program can actually go beyond the antibiotics in helping to clear the symptoms and to maintain a remission.

Although the scientific basis for the benefits of exercises is not known, there are several reasonable theories.

It is known that Bb will die if exposed to all but the tiniest oxygen concentrations. If an aggressive exercise program can increase tissue perfusion and oxygen levels, then this may play a role in what is being seen.

Also, during aggressive exercise, the core body temperature can rise above 102 degrees; it is known that B. burgdorferi is very heat sensitive. Perhaps it is the added tissue oxygenation, or higher body temperature, or the combination that weakens the Lyme Borrelia, and allows the antibiotics and our defenses to be more effective.

Regular exercise-related movements can help mobilize lymph and enhance circulation. In addition,there is now evidence that a carefully structured exercise program may benefit T-cell function: this function will depress for 12 to 24+ hours after exercise, but then rebound.

This T-cell depression is more pronounced after aerobics which is why aerobics are not allowed. The goal is to exercise intermittently, with exercise days separated by days of total rest, including an effort to have plenty of quality sleep.

The trick is to time the exercise days to take advantage of these rebounds. For an example, begin with an exercise day followed by 3 to 5 rest days; as stamina improves, then fewer rest days will be needed in between workouts.

However, because T-cell functions do fall for at least one day after aggressive exercises, be sure to never exercise two days in a row. Finally, an in intermittent exercise program, properly executed, may help to reset the HPA axis more towards normal.

On the following page is an exercise prescription that details these recommendations.

This program may begin with classical physical therapy if necessary. The physical therapy should involve massage, heat, ultrasound and simple range of motion exercises to relieve discomfort and promote better sleep and flexibility.

Ice (vasoconstriction) and electrical stimulation (muscle spasm and trauma) should not be used!

The program must evolve into a graded, ultimately strenuous exercise program that consists of a specific regimen of non-aerobic conditioning- see below.

Have the patient complete a gentle hour of prescribed exercise, then go home, have a hot bath or shower, than try to take a nap. Initially, patients will need this sleep, but as they recover, the exercise will energize them and then a nap will no longer be needed.

NOTE: a cardiac stress test may be necessary prior to exercising to ensure safety.
-------------

Page 32:

LYME REHAB-PHYSICAL THERAPY PRESCRIPTION

. . . (there is a P.T. prescription all set to fill out here) . . .

Excerpt:

PROGRAM:

1. Aerobic exercises are NOT allowed, not even low impact variety, until the patient has recovered.

2. Conditioning: work to improve strength and reverse the poor conditioning that results from Lyme, through a whole-body exercise program, consisting of light calisthenics and/or resistance training, using light resistance and many repetitions.

This can be accomplished in exercise classes called "stretch and tone", or "body sculpture", or can be achieved in the gym with exercise machines or carefully with free weights (see cautions above).

3. Each session should last one hour. A gentle hour is preferable to a strenuous half-hour. If the patient is unable to continue for the whole hour, then decrease the intensity to allow him/her to do so.

4. Exercise no more often than every other day. The patient may need to start by exercising every 4th or 5th day initially, and as abilities improve, work out more often, but NEVER two days in a row. The nonexercise days should be spent resting.

5. This whole-body conditioning program is what is required to achieve wellness. A simple walking program will not work, and simply placing the patient on a treadmill or an exercise bike is not acceptable (except very briefly, as part of a warm-up), as aerobics can be damaging and must be avoided. . . .

- Much more at the link.

==============

To help support body functions:

http://www.lymepa.org/Nutritional_Supplements.pdf

Nutritional Supplements in Disseminated Lyme Disease

J.J. Burrascano, Jr., MD (2008)

====================

You asked why no aerobics during infections: (in addition to explanations above) heart and brain are two reasons. With infection, aerobics can damage the heart.

www.ott.zynet.co.uk/polio/lincolnshire/library/uk/post-me.html

or http://tinyurl.com/33rxy8

From Dr. Bruno's "Fainting and Fatigue" in the Spring 1996 CFIDS Chronicle

Post-polio expert Dr. Richard Bruno points out that physical over-activity is the biggest cause of post-polio symptoms. [3]

Excerpt:

``when mice infected with Coxsackie B3 were forced to swim in a warm pool, the virulence of the virus was drastically augmented.

In fact, viral replication was augmented 530 times. This did horrendous things to the animals' hearts. We all know that to play squash with the flu can lead to heart attacks.

Much the same danger can be courted by undertaking hard exercise with M.E. (CFS).'' - End quote.

==============

See the post about brain hypoperfusion (and how aerobic exercise making that worse for CFS patients) from the SPECT details from the Nightingale group. This thread also talks about POTS, etc.:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/77325

Topic: To everyone with cardiac symptoms please read !


Tai Chi, Qi Gong, some kinds of Yoga and Pilates routines . . . strength training . . . walking . . . maybe slow biking . . . water movement (Tai Chi in water is very nice) . . . whatever brings you joy of movement while safely supporting your body. Do what you love. Dancing can be good.

There are many speeds to most activities. Do what you love at a speed your body will love you for.
-

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Keebler
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-
This is included in Burrascano's Guidelines, but you may want to be able to refer to it separately, too:

http://www.lymepa.org/Nutritional_Supplements.pdf

** Nutritional Supplements in Disseminated Lyme Disease **

J.J. Burrascano, Jr., MD (2008) - Four pages
-

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Aimee
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I too have mild tremors in my hands - and they often feel weak as do my arms and occasionally my legs too.

I switched up my abx to Ceftin, Probenecid and Biaxin a week ago and have noticed mild improvement.

Most of my remaining symptoms are neurological and I am hopeful too that Ceftin will cross the BBB and kick lyme out. I'll be curious to hear how your daughter does on Ceftin as well - post and update!

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jwick25
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I also deal with the shakes and weak arms and legs. In fact, as I type this, my arms feel practically numb.

While not a doctor, I agree with other posters about the central nervous system. I've experienced this myself and believe that it will improve with proper treatment.

All the best!

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eightybarb
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I too have shakiness in the hands, feeling weak all over,tingling in the palms,feet. Last week I had my eyes got tested and my neck was trembling like crazy. My LLMD says it is related to Lyme.
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sickpuppy
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I shake too. Don't worry LymeMom, it's the bugs.
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