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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Vitamin B-complex ingredients

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average joe
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Ok so I just went to take a B-complex vitamin and noticed on the label it says yeast [Eek!] and liver base. Not good for us lymies. Is this common for vitamins ect?

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If you play at the beach, expect to get some sand in your shorts [Smile]

Posts: 223 | From central pa | Registered: May 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marrit
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You can get yeast-free B's.
Pure Encapsulations is yeast-free and has no added fillers.

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Keebler
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Just as we can enjoy many mushrooms (which are fungi), and some are even medicinal mushrooms that support our immune system or calm our nervous systems . . . certain other members of the fungi world are not only good for us, they are excellent.

Yeast, as in NUTRITIONAL yeast is excellent for us, actually. In fact, it offers good nutrients, including some key probiotics. More here about that:

=========================

http://www.drlwilson.com/articles/candida.htm

CHRONIC INTESTINAL YEAST INFECTION
by Lawrence Wilson, MD

Yeasts, molds and fungi are one-celled organisms that are ever-present in the environment.

* Beneficial ones include brewers and nutritional yeast, and lactobacillus acidophilus.

Many others are beneficial as well, and are used in industry and in our bodies to produce various vitamins, for example, and other beneficial substances. . . .

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http://www.smdp.com/Articles-c-2009-04-24-52910.113116_Singing_the_praisesof_nutritional_yeast.html

Singing the praises of nutritional yeast

By Elizabeth Brown

Excerpt:

. . . Nutritional yeast, unlike yeast used in baking or making beer, is a deactivated yeast, made by growing it in a medium of sugarcane and beet molasses, then harvesting, washing, drying and packaging the yeast.

It is candida albicans free, which means it can be enjoyed even by yeast sensitive individuals. . . .

. . . Since your body can only absorb so much of any one nutrient at a time and since you need B-vitamins dispersed throughout the day to help your body convert food to energy, I recommend adding just a teaspoon of nutritional yeast to foods at each meal. . . .

[Elizabeth Brown is a registered dietitian and certified holistic chef]

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Her suggestion of taking just one teaspoon at a time (a measured teaspoon from your cooking tools, not from the silverware drawer) . . . it would decrease chances of overstimulation that the natural glutamate may cause for some people if they were to try to get a day's worth all at once.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutritional_yeast

Nutritional yeast

Nutritional yeast, similar to brewer's yeast, is a deactivated yeast, usually Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

. . . Nutritional yeast products do not have any "added" monosodium glutamate as an ingredient, however all inactive yeast (dead yeast) contains a certain amount of free glutamic acid because when the yeast cells are killed the protein that comprises the cell walls begins to degrade breaking down into the amino acids that originally formed it. Glutamic acid is a naturally occurring amino acid in all yeast cells, along with many other vegetables, fungus and meats.

Some people report similar side effects when consuming high levels of free glutamate as they do when consuming MSG.

High temperature* nutritional yeast products apparently yield elevated concentrations of the excitotoxin glutamate as a by-product. . . .

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*[So, just back down in dose if it produces any agitation.]

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http://www.vitacost.com/Lewis-Labs-Brewers-Yeast

Lewis Labs Brewer's Yeast -- 32 oz

This premium yeast is grown on sugar beets which are known to absorb nutrients from the soil faster than almost any other crop. As a result, this yeast is exceptionally rich in selenium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, copper, manganese, iron, zinc and other factors natural to yeast.

. . . [See link for list of nutrients] . . . .

Other Ingredients:

CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING MINERAL AND TRACE ELEMENTS: Calcium, Chromium, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Potassium, Selenium, Silicon, Sodium, Zinc

* Free Of Gluten *

Per serving, going by the RDA, It lists the B-vitamins out by their individual names.

It is loaded with these B vitamins:
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Thiamin 80% (that is vitamin B1)

Riboflavin 90% (that is vitamin B2)

Niacin 50 % (That's B-3)

Vitamin B6 40 %

Folic acid 15 % (another one of the B vitamin complex)

Biotin (which is B7), Pantothine (that is B 5) and B-12 are in much lower concentrations but you also get more from food.

Inositol 101 grams (that is part of the B-complex family)

Choline 126 grams (also a B-Complex Vitamin)

16 grams of PROTEIN is excellent, too. Pretty power packed, actually.
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Marrit
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But, some people are sensitive to yeast. I can't eat anything with baker's yeast, and nutritional yeast causes the same painful gastrointestinal issues.

I used to be able to eat it years ago before I got sick and became both gluten intolerant and yeast sensitive.

When my son was in college, he started taking nutritional yeast for energy, and after a few days, he broke out in hives all over his body. He tried again a month or so later and the same thing happened.

I wish I could eat it. If I could, I'd probably become a vegetarian.

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Marrit
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p.s. I tried to take the Florastor, and after only 2 capsules I had to quit. Very bad reaction gastro-intestinally, just like other types of yeast. And the Florastor is supposed to be good for you?!
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