LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Any vegetarians on Dr. B's diet?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Any vegetarians on Dr. B's diet?
bashibazouks
Member
Member # 28286

Icon 1 posted      Profile for bashibazouks     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi all,
I'm looking forward to seeing my first real LLMD on Friday, thanks to tips from LymeNet. In the meantime I've been reading up on Dr. Burrascano's guidelines and trying to plan how my lifestyle is going to change, particularly adapting to the new diet. I've been a vegetarian for 8 years so I eat a pretty carb-heavy diet with lots of bread, pasta, potatoes, etc. Sounds like I'm supposed to go easy on the carbs and eat a lot of protein once I start treatment. Anyways, I guess I just wanted to know if anyone else was in the same boat... if you have any vegetarian but protein-rich recipes, send them my way!! I'm going to try to stick to vegetarianism unless I feel like it will really compromise my health.
As usual, thanks to everyone for your help. This site has really come to mean a lot to me, just in the past couple weeks.

--------------------
Currently infected with Lyme, Babesia, Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Mycoplasma, & Q-fever.

10 months into treatment, currently on Bicillin, Rocephin, Doxy, Biaxin, and Mepron.

Posts: 87 | From USA | Registered: Sep 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Glad you have found help here!! We're happy about that too!!

As for your question.. I do hope someone will be able to help you. It IS important to go low carb, so I would say this will be difficult for you.

Guess you'll have to eat plenty of green vegetables and tofu!!

Do you eat eggs?

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95672 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Breaking up text so more can read:

Hi all,

I'm looking forward to seeing my first real LLMD on Friday, thanks to tips from LymeNet. In the meantime I've been reading up on Dr. Burrascano's guidelines and trying to plan how my lifestyle is going to change, particularly adapting to the new diet.

I've been a vegetarian for 8 years so I eat a pretty carb-heavy diet with lots of bread, pasta, potatoes, etc.

Sounds like I'm supposed to go easy on the carbs and eat a lot of protein once I start treatment. Anyways, I guess I just wanted to know if anyone else was in the same boat...

if you have any vegetarian but protein-rich recipes, send them my way!! I'm going to try to stick to vegetarianism unless I feel like it will really compromise my health.

As usual, thanks to everyone for your help. This site has really come to mean a lot to me, just in the past couple weeks.

(bashibazouks in Newark, DE)
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I was vegetarian for many years but found I really needed some animal protein in order to not pass out so much. I also did not do "vegetarian" correctly. Unaware that taurine was nearly absent in my diet, my nerves suffered.

I'm not sure why you are committed to a vegetarian diet but do ask your LLMD about this.

You will need go to easy on carbs from grains but, if vegetables, nuts and legume are your mainstay - with supplementing B-12 as well as Taurine (as vegetarians risk low levels), this could work.

I wonder if you would consider eggs and fish. Both are excellent nutrition sources that are not carb heavy.

A diet free of gluten, corn, soy and dairy is suggested. It's going to be tougher being free of soy - at least at first to see how you so as many are allergic and it can block thyroid, some say.

If you do eat soy, it MUST be organic. MUST be.


No simple sugars, no processed foods, etc.

Below are some BASIC suggestions. Carbs - only complex WHOLE GRAIN are to be moderate, in proportion to vegetables and protein.

====================================

Vegetarian:

www.christinacooks.com

CHRISTINA COOKS - Natural health advocate/ chef, Christina Pirello offers her comprehensive guide to living the well life.

Vegan, with a Mediterranean flair. Organic.

She was dx with terminal leukemia in her mid-twenties. Doctors said there was nothing more they could do. Among other things, she learned about complementary medicine and she learned how to cook whole foods. She recovered her health and is now a chef and professor of culinary arts.

She has program on the PBS network "Create" a couple times week. Check your PBS schedule.

To adapt: in the rare dishes where she uses wheat flour, it can just be left out for a fruit medley, etc. Brown Rice Pasta can be substituted (Tinkyada or Trader Joe's). Quinoa and the dark rices can also be used.

But she focuses mostly on very filling vegetable dishes and garden herbs.

Regarding her use of brown rice syrup, just leave it out and add a touch of stevia at the end.

==================

Not vegetarian but can be adapted.

www.rickbayless.com

Rick Bayless is a very good chef for MEXICAN meals that are healthy. These are heavy on vegetables.

====================

http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/

Spoonful of Ginger site

Books: http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/pages/books.php

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER (1999)

From Nina Simonds, the best-selling authority on Asian cooking, comes a ground-breaking cookbook based on the Asian philosophy of food as health-giving. The 200 delectable recipes she offers you not only taste superb but also have specific healing . . . .

. . . With an emphasis on the health-giving properties of herbs and spices, this book gives the latest scientific research as well as references to their tonic properties according to Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, the traditional Indian philosophy of medicine. . . .

You can find this at Amazon, too.

=========================

http://www.simply-natural.biz/Cure-Is-In-The-Kitchen.php

THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN, by Sherry A. Rogers M.D., is the first book to ever spell out in detail what all those people ate day to day who cleared their incurable diseases . . .

She has a newer book out about simple Indian meals. Not necessarily vegetarian.

==========================

http://www.ecookbooks.com/p-4293-from-curries-to-kebabs.aspx

FROM CURRIES TO KEBABS - RECIPES FROM THE INDIAN SPICE TRAIL - by: Jaffrey, Madhur

==========================

Also look for MOOSEWOOD Cookbooks and THE ENCHANTED BROCCOLI FOREST

==========================

MEDITERRANEAN DIET (minus the wheat and the wine) is also good. It's many vegetable based, with delicious herbs in the meat dishes. Quinoa, dark rices - and unsweetened pomegranate juice can be substituted.

===================

www.LotusFoods.com

Look up Black Forbidden Chinese Rice & the Red Bhutanese Rice. The nutritional content is excellent and these will help fill and fortify you, even in moderation, along with lots of vegetables.

-------------------
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_og_wild_wehani.aspx

Wehani & Wild Rice (Organic)

-----------
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_nf_japonica.aspx

Black Japonica

---------
http://www.quinoa.net/181.html

Quinoa Recipes

----------
http://www.quinoa.net/4600.html

Red Quinoa Recipes
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
If you have enough protein (and that is combined with good veggies and other complex carbs - and good fats) your body will not crave simple carbs.

Protein helps our bodies make glutathione and that helps the liver detox . . . protein's amino acids help our brain, our hearts, our muscles, etc.

Taurine (found mostly in muscle meats) is vital, too. Vegetarians and vegans should consider supplementing taurine, as well as B-12 and L-Carnitine.
-------------------

http://icmr.nic.in/ijmr/2006/august/0804.pdf

THE REQUIREMENTS OF PROTEIN & AMINO ACID DURING ACUTE & CHRONIC INFECTION . . . - 20 pages

Anura V. Kurpad - Institute of Population Health & Clinical Research, Bangalore, India 129. Indian J Med Res 124, August 2006, pp 129-148.

Excerpt:

" . . . In general, the amount of EXTRA protein that would appear to be needed is of the order of 20-25 per cent of the recommended intake, for most infections. . . ."

- Full article at link (or google the title if it does not go through).

=============================

Note: Eggs should be from cage-free, truly free range chickens that are given organic feed. "Happy Chickens" give more healthful eggs.

Fish should be LOW mercury or NO mercury (if possible). Google for sites to guide you. Tuna fish is off the menu as it's loaded with mercury - even the "dolphin-safe" tuna is too high in mercury.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=020605

MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR LLMD VISIT
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
up for "bash"

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95672 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
nefferdun
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 20157

Icon 1 posted      Profile for nefferdun     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am not doing the high protein diet and I would be a complete vegetarian if I had better recipes. I have not eaten any red meat for two years and I feel better now than before.

I try to eat health promoting foods like broccoli, spinach, blueberries, pomegranite, honey, ground flax, coconut oil, apple cider vinegar (with mother), yogurt, nuts, seeds, mushrooms and even whole wheat flour, organic milk and cheese.

When I followed "the diet" I smelled horrible and I was constipated. Red meat has a lot of toxins so I do not believe it is healthy for me. I do not have any problem with gluten or dairy.

What I do completely avoid is alcohol and sugar. I do not touch it.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

Posts: 4676 | From western Montana | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sillia
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 23994

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sillia     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I eat a plant-based, whole foods diet, and have been for nearly ten years. No meat, no dairy. Various kinds of beans and lentils are an integral part of what I eat, so I do not worry about protein. I eat a little tofu occasionally, maybe once a week.

I don't eat any "simple carbs" like flour products, sugar, refined foods or anything in a package. I stay completely away from wheat and gluten for now, though I am not sure this will be necessary long-term.

I do eat a lot of "complex carbs"--brown rice, other whole grains, potatoes, sweet potatoes, root vegetables, etc, plus a lot of fresh and frozen vegetables, and fruit.

I am only six months into my Lyme treatment so I can't testify as to how well I'm doing. I guess there's no way to know for sure how your diet influences your progress, but striving for the healthiest possible diet seems worthwhile.

Posts: 261 | From Nebraska | Registered: Jan 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MichaelTampa
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 24868

Icon 1 posted      Profile for MichaelTampa     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am a vegan and for time periods have really minimized carbs.

I supplement some with hemp protein powder, nutiva brand much better than manitoba farms in my opinion.

I would soak nuts and seeds and then put them through the champion juicer with the plastic piece instead of the metal screen, which basically turns them into mush. Then, I would add whatever flavorings I wanted (onion powder, garlic powder, turmeric, ceyenne, etc.) and turn them into burger type things.

Agree it's important to look into taurine, but best if you can energy test and be careful to notice reactions. I tried taurine supplements and they had a bad reaction in my head, funny feeling. I later read something that I believe explained why it's not right for everyone, but don't remember the details of that, it was a while ago.

Michael

Posts: 1927 | From se usa | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
fatigued15
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for fatigued15     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am a vegetarian and have been for 35 years. I will send you some recipes in the next few days. Good luck at your appointment.

If I forget send me a PM to remind me.

Posts: 488 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
shadesofpurple
Member
Member # 23923

Icon 1 posted      Profile for shadesofpurple     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I follow a plant based diet as well, on rare occasion i do deviate and might add some seafood, but rarely. I don't believe that animal protein is neccessary at all, but have yet to be able to give up certain things, like cheese & eggs.

I do eat a lot of things with beans in them, so maybe you could boost your bean intake. I avoid any soy that is not organic.

Beans & Rice
Bean Burritos
Vegetarian Baked Beans
Vegetarian Chili
Eggs are good source if you are not vegan
If you are not vegan you could have
french toast
scrambled egg wraps
eggs & hash browns etc
etc....
Portabella Mushroom sandwichs are great.
stir fry with nuts are good too (cashews & almonds, pine nuts work well)

I have been treating Lyme since Feb and do feel much better.

I do avoid all alcohol and try to avoid added sugar and processed foods, anything out of a box etc.

You can look up some great recipes online at :
allrecipes.com

You can then type in vegetarian and it will narrow your search

There are many vegetarian websites as well that have great recipes.

I have to say I am happy to see so many responses on here supporting your choice to be vegetarian.

I do have to add that with all things, everyone is different and somethings may or may not bother you , I think it is just trial & error.

Bread & pasta doesn't bother me , but I have heard many people on here say they avoid it, for whatever reason.

I love potatoes and try to curb that craving but substituting sweet potatoes when ever i can.

You will have to see what is best for you.

Personally I think plant based diet is the best thing you can do for your health, but you have to make sure you stay the course and avoid junk and keep things balanced.

Posts: 86 | From Central PA | Registered: Jan 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bashibazouks
Member
Member # 28286

Icon 1 posted      Profile for bashibazouks     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow, I just noticed all these responses-- fantastic! Thanks so much for your thoughts & suggestions.

Think I will stick to vegetarianism after all. Sounds like it won't be TOO terribly challenging. For me, sugar will be the hardest thing to avoid...

I guess I'm still a little confused about the diet though. Everyone seems to agree on "no alcohol" and "no sugar", but what about bread?

Dr. Burrascano says "STARCHES: None!! If it is made from flour- any kind of flour- it is not allowed."

But above, people have listed "whole wheat flour", "toast" and "wraps", etc. as things that are OK to eat.

Similarly, sugar is supposed to be bad, but honey is okay-- even though honey is mostly sugar?

I guess what I'm wondering is, how strict is the diet? Do I need to adhere to it strictly 100% of the time? Or just try to follow the general gist of it?

I'll meet with the doctor on Friday & ask these same questions, so no pressure!

--------------------
Currently infected with Lyme, Babesia, Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Mycoplasma, & Q-fever.

10 months into treatment, currently on Bicillin, Rocephin, Doxy, Biaxin, and Mepron.

Posts: 87 | From USA | Registered: Sep 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
nefferdun
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 20157

Icon 1 posted      Profile for nefferdun     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it depends on the person, just like what abx works best for you. I use a little honey. I did not eat any sweetening at all for months but decided I needed something. There is no printed information saying honey is ok. I am saying I made it ok for me.

Honey, if you research it, kills bacteria. It has been used for hundreds of years for wounds and burns. I eat about one tablespoon a day in different things, like tea or oatmeal. Once in a while I bake something, like carrot bread with it and use about a third of a cup in the recipe. I counteract the "bad stuff" with a lot of walnuts and ground flax and coconut oil.

Maybe I am in denial about eating whole wheat (and shouldn't be doing it) but a small amount seems to be ok. You sure wouldn't want to have it three times a day.

You have to be careful not to create yeast and high carbs that convert quickly to glucose will make you a yeasty mess. But even if you eat high protein (which I tried) you will have yeast issues.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

Posts: 4676 | From western Montana | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
shadesofpurple
Member
Member # 23923

Icon 1 posted      Profile for shadesofpurple     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree I think it depends on the person, I eat bread, all kinds, rye, wheat, pumpernickel, even white etc.
I know some people avoid it altogether.

It does not bother me at all to have bread, but then again I am not eating a ton, just usually rye toast for breakfast and maybe a piece of italian here & there.

maybe a roll with some portabella Mushrooms, & peppers & onions etc. etc. I think it depends on you and maybe also on what you eat it with... like beans with rice etc. my meals are usually pretty balanced.

It probably also depends on how struck down by Lyme you are... and where you are on your treatment.

I did give up all sugar in the beginning, and for me that was pretty easy. Bread on the other hand was not easy for me and i just kind of kept it in there , just at a restricted level in the beginning. I still don't eat much sugar, but that is because it prompts me to have a headache for some reason...

A food log would help you keep track , especially if you log how things make you feel.

i found that helped me know what was tolerated by me and what was not.

I know for some yeast is a BIG issue , so I suggest a food log or journal , it may help you keep track of what you can & can't do. and as you get better i think , at least for me... more things are tolerated.

Posts: 86 | From Central PA | Registered: Jan 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymeshmyme
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 26774

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lymeshmyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Does anyone have a direct link to Dr B's PDF about Lyme? I can't seem to locate it.
Posts: 256 | From Texas | Registered: Jun 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bashibazouks
Member
Member # 28286

Icon 1 posted      Profile for bashibazouks     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
http://www.canlyme.com/2008_October_Burrascano_Lyme_guidelines.pdf

The diet restrictions are towards the end, beginning on page 34.

--------------------
Currently infected with Lyme, Babesia, Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Mycoplasma, & Q-fever.

10 months into treatment, currently on Bicillin, Rocephin, Doxy, Biaxin, and Mepron.

Posts: 87 | From USA | Registered: Sep 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.