LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Is the General Medical Population Biased against Women?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Is the General Medical Population Biased against Women?
cafe67
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My husband and I saw the same GP. Myself, first after 8 months of on going symptoms. GP diagnosed me as anxiety/depression prescribed anti-depressant. I finally, through much research and much help from here, figured out it is lyme and am now being treated by a great LLMD.

My husband, after recently starting with the same symptoms, went to our GP. My Hubby presented to him with the EXACT same symptoms as me. Joint aches, major fatigue, heart palps, tight/squeezing chest, shortness of breath, dry cough, etc.

The GP, even after knowing my history, diagnosed him with pleurisy. Chest x-ray everything ok! Perfect specimin, if I do say so myself!

1. He did however get doxy - I think the GP is catching on. Along with an inhaler and prednisone, which now I KNOW he should not take.

2. I think maybe I focused more on heart palps and hubby focused more on chest pains? And the doctor took that cue?

3. In a way this might be good that I was the "depressed" one first because my H could have been on prednisone and getting worse.

Not only are we fighting against proper treatment for lyme, but as women, against the pre-disposed opinions of the medical world, who want to fit us neatly into the mental health category; depression.

Just some food for thought.


IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cafe67
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Cave: I know! LOL I have had several answers in my posts which don't make sense, then I realize that someone has replied to you by mistake. Keeps me laughing anyway, you bunch of lymebrains.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymesux
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6248

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lymesux     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I, too think the med profession is biased against women.

Though I tend to see it even with my children - the boy may have the same symptoms as the girl and the boy gets much more of a work up than the girl. Hers are somatic or she is copying her mom.

SAD.


Posts: 799 | From home | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dontlikeliver
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 4749

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dontlikeliver     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes. And, it's not just the medical profession. Let me not even get started on that one!

DLL


Posts: 2824 | From The Back of Beyond | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kara Tyson
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 939

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kara Tyson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it has always been this way, from the earliest of times. It is nothing new. It is basically treating women as children who cannot make their own decisions.

When my parents divorced in the early 70's my mother wanted a tubal ligation. She couldnt get one without my dad's permission (they were not married) OR a male neighbor/friend. So our next door neighbor "gave" his permission.


Posts: 6022 | From Mobile, AL | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
janet thomas
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 7122

Icon 1 posted      Profile for janet thomas     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Has a Western Blot been ordered for your husband?? Hugs. Janet
Posts: 2001 | From NJ | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cafe67
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
JH - I'm sure our GP did your favorite ELISA test. That's ok, I want him to see how bad they are - we get Hubby an Igenex test at our LLMD next week.

Kara: Funny, not! I am the one who researched all this and made all the mistakes; dealt with drs., etc. Pay and organize all the medical bills to those doctors.

My husbands like "erlicky what" "babooneoisis what"? I basically have to tell him how to go about getting treated - which he is happy to relinquish to me.

Doctors should take better care of the "caregivers of the world"

Well, gotta run I have to do laundry, pay bills, make dinner, get basketball uniform ready for oldest son, pack things to keep others happy at BB game, pack medicine that hubby forgot...............


IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
NP40
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 6711

Icon 1 posted      Profile for NP40     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Of course they treat men and women differently ! Why not ? Us men, when we go to the doc, we're really sick !

Seriously, ladies and germs, women are much more in tune with their own bodies. Probably stems from hauling the little papooses around for 9 months.

Men, on the other hand................would sever their leg in a chainsaw accident, and grudgingly go to get a couple of stitches to fix er' up............and then would fantasize about doing the female paramedic on the way to the hospital.

What can I say, we're nutso ! I think the old stereotype holds, that men only go as a last resort, if they can't "shake it". Sooooo, they must "really" be sick ! We are.

Psychologically.

Women of course, will go at the drop of a hat, because they go in the early stages, before they sever all the way through with the chainsaw...........and of course they want to check out the doc to see if he's "marrying" material, for their daughters.


Posts: 1632 | From Northern Wisconsin | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymester
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 5848

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymester     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It's bias based on fear of womens understanding and the ability to self diagnose themselves and family far earlier than any school/med education could teach a doc. Everybody's threatened.

Societally (sp)?:

A woman is always expecting that she needs to be better than she may be, so physically understand when they dont feel well and know/care enough to do something about it.

A man thinks he's pretty good already and doesn't aspire to be any better. When they feel sick, then their life is over, they're dying... wah, wah, wah.

I also feel that the man can't accept the female partner's weakness. It's like driving a used car with square tires. They want you to be there to take care of them like mom used to.

Guys... I AM Generalizing. I have a great husband, but I have dealt with this for so long I would have been better off explaining to him that I had terminal cancer.


Posts: 519 | From CT | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Linda LD
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 6663

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Linda LD     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I read about a study and who knows it might have been in the Enquirer--but the article said that a study was published and they sent so many actresses and actors of the same general age to the same emergency rooms describing the same pains. 90% of the men were diagnosed correctly with a heart attack. 90% of the women were told to go home--they had emotional problems.

Wish I could remember where I read this...

l


Posts: 1171 | From Knoxville, TN US | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kara Tyson
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 939

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kara Tyson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it is just that men dont want to know what is wrong with them.
Posts: 6022 | From Mobile, AL | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
laserred
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6796

Icon 1 posted      Profile for laserred     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
And statistics say women live at an average of 10 years longer then men also....
so...DUH...tell ya anything, guys??????

Just goes to show...You guys shouldn't just try to "tough it out", that isn't always the smartest thing to do....but then again...that brings us back to the fact that...(what cave76 added)...They also would probably get lost on the way to the hospital because "they wouldn't ask for directions". !

[This message has been edited by laserred (edited 09 June 2005).]


Posts: 493 | From MidWest NorthWoods | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kara Tyson
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 939

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kara Tyson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It would be interesting to do a survey just between men and women, "if you had terminal cancer, would you want to know?"

I want to know what is wrong with me. No matter what!


Posts: 6022 | From Mobile, AL | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aniek
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5374

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Aniek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I can't help but wonder how much of this goes back to old traditions of midwives and women taking care of their family through folk remedies. The doctors needed to believe the women were wrong in order to convince people that a doctor was needed. And, back then, all doctors were men.

For so many years, medical research was also done primarily on white men. That means that doctors simply know more about the male body and the impact of drugs on the male body. And, it's even limited by race.



Posts: 4711 | From Washington, DC | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kara Tyson
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 939

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kara Tyson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Unfort. the 1960's insisted that men and women were the same (and that all races were the same)medically. Neither is true.

Women react differant to medications, so do people of differant races.

There is much research that shows that people do better with blood transfusions from others of the same race (if possible). But heaven forbid that we consider this fact.


Posts: 6022 | From Mobile, AL | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymerayja
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6839

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymerayja     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree that women definitely get the short end of the stick as patients, just like they do in most (not all) other spheres of life. Also, the Steere camp is mainly men - some of them very viciously sexist, like Sigal and Shapiro.

Here is an excellent new article just out, dealing with medical misogyny, by ILADS Dr Virginia Sherr:

Med Hypotheses. 2005 May 27; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, Links

Munchausen's syndrome by proxy and Lyme disease: Medical misogyny or diagnostic mystery?

Sherr VT.

47 Crescent Drive, Holland, PA 18966-2105, USA.

Chronic, tertiary Lyme disease, a vector-borne infection most accurately designated neuroborreliosis, is often misdiagnosed.

Infectors of the human brain, Lyme borrelial spirochetes are neurotropic, similar to the spirochetes of syphilis. Symptoms of either disease may be stable and persistent, transient and inconsistent or severe yet fleeting.

Characteristics may be incompatible with established knowledge of neurological dermatomes, appearing to conventional medical eyes as anatomically impossible, thus creating confusion for doctors, parents and child patients.

Physicians unfamiliar with Lyme patients' shifting, seemingly vague, emotional, and/or bizarre-sounding complaints, frequently know little about late-stage spirochetal disease. Consequently, they may accuse mothers of fabricating their children's symptoms - the so-called Munchausen's by proxy (MBP) "diagnoses."

Women, following ancient losses of feminine authority in provinces of religion, ethics, and healing - disciplines comprising known fields of early medicine, have been scapegoated throughout history. In the Middle Ages, women considered potentially weak-minded devil's apprentices became victims of witch-hunts throughout Europe and America. Millions of women were burned alive at the stake.

Modern medicine's tendency to trivialize women's "offbeat" concerns and the fact that today's hurried physicians of both genders tend to seek easy panaceas, frequently result in the misogyny of mother-devaluation, especially by doctors who are spirochetally naive. These factors, when involving cases of cryptic neuroborreliosis, may lead to accusations of MBP.

Thousands of children, sick from complex diseases, have been forcibly removed from mothers who insist, contrary to customary evaluations, that their children are ill.

The charges against these mothers relate to the idea they believe their children sick to satisfy warped internal agendas of their own. "MBP mothers" are then vilified, frequently jailed and publicly shamed for the "sins" of advocating for their children.

In actuality, many such cases involve an unrecognized Lyme borreliosis causation that mothers may insist is valid despite negative tests.

Doctors who have utilized MBP tactics against mothers are likely to be unaware that in advanced borreliosis, seronegativity is often the rule, a principle disagreed upon by its two extant, published, peer-reviewed, Standards of Care. These are guidelines for Lyme disease management - the older system questioning the existence of persistent Lyme and the newer system relying on established clinical criteria.

Mothers must be free to obtain the family's preferred medical care by choosing between physicians practicing within either system without fear of reprisal. Doctors and mothers together may then explore medical options with renewed mutual respect toward the best interest of children's health.

PMID: 15925450 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


[This message has been edited by Lymerayja (edited 10 June 2005).]


Posts: 284 | From UK | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
JillF
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5553

Icon 1 posted      Profile for JillF     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My LLMD makes my weight an issue every time I see him.

He wants me to see a nutritionist he works with.

My husband needs to lose at least as much weight as me.

The same LLMD will not bring up my husband's weight at all. Does not tell him to lose weight, does not ask him if he's lost any weight, does not tell him that he needs to see the nutritionist...

I am not amused at all that this LLMD is making my weight a big deal but won't even mention my husband's weight at all.


Posts: 1485 | From USA | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
DR. Wiseass
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6777

Icon 1 posted      Profile for DR. Wiseass   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Is the medical profession biased against women?

Why, OF COURSE IT IS, darling!

hahahahaha!

I know it's not really a laughing matter, but I'd rather laugh hysterically and inappropriately than to cry - because if I CRY -that just means my hormones are messed up because I'm an overly-sensitive WOMAN! Gag)

The only time I generally have penis envy is when I see a doc for the first time, and right after Thanksgiving dinner when the 'boys' retire in front of the TV with their hands down their pants - and the 'women' get to clean up!

------------------
DR. Wiseass - not a real doc - just a real wise ass.
www.twistoflyme.blogspot.com


Posts: 792 | From USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Carol in PA
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 5338

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Carol in PA     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The answer to your question is, "Heck yes!"

When I had five teeth surgically removed, the dentist told me to take Tylenol for the pain.
Several years later, my husband went to the SAME oral surgeon to have wisdom teeth removed, and the doc gave him a prescription for narcotics for pain relief.
Sheesh.....

Carol


Posts: 6947 | From Lancaster, PA | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
brainless
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6771

Icon 1 posted      Profile for brainless     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A Portland, Oregon radiologist told me, "There are a lot of neurotic women out there."

b


Posts: 210 | From lalaland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.