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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » it's official: bio-terrorism includes lyme

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Author Topic: it's official: bio-terrorism includes lyme
lpkayak
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HAS THIS BEEN POSTED YET?

Star-Telegram
Texas News
Mon, Nov. 14, 2005

UTSA opens new bioterrorism lab

Associated Press


SAN ANTONIO - A new research lab for bioterrorism opened Monday at the
University of Texas at San Antonio.

The $10.6 million Margaret Batts Tobin Laboratory Building will provide a
22,000-square-foot facility to study such diseases as anthrax, tularemia,
cholera, lyme disease, desert valley fever and other parasitic and fungal
diseases.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these diseases as
potential bioterrorism agents. Fifteen university researchers make up the
newly established South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Earlier this year, the researchers were awarded $9 million in federal funding
for bioterrorism research conducted in a smaller lab on campus.
*****

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Copyright 2004 Knight Ridder.

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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lymie tony z
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I don't think this has been posted previously...so it's good to see some official recognition...

A lot of we lymies have suspected lyme is a genetically engineered bio weapon that was developed by US and Russia...to not outright kill people but render them useless in fighting a war or wars....mentally and physically.

I even went so far as to write the whitehouse about it's possibilities a couple years ago...course I never got a reply...
Gulf war syndrome is much the same as lyme disease....hhhmmmmmmm..........

Thanks for the post...................zman

--------------------
I am not a doctor...opinions expressed are from personal experiences only and should never be viewed as coming from a healthcare provider. zman

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Somerset
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"lpkaya," Thank you for posting info on bio-lab.I try hard to keep an open mind on things ,but for years now I find that the controversial side of some things,such as this have more logic behind them , for me it it started with Mycoplasma & Aids soooooooooooo interesting. Robin
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cantgiveupyet
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Ive been thinking about this the last couple of weeks. Especially the fact that certain foods bring out more symptoms....because of yeast. Basically you are in a lot of pain and then have to watch what you eat as well....it sounded to me that this was a man made disease....Also the fact that certain parts of the country are more affected...like the east coast...

thanks for posting.

--------------------
"Say it straight simple and with a smile."

"Thus the task is, not so much to see what no one has seen yet,
But to think what nobody has thought yet, About what everybody sees."

-Schopenhauer

pos babs, bart, igenex WB igm/igg

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lightfoot
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Thanks and yikes!!!!

--------------------
Healing Smiles.....lightfoot [Smile] [Smile] [Smile]

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James H
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How ironic! There is not a Dr. in San Antonio that is willing to treat someone for Lyme, or even acknowledge it is possible for someone in Texas to have it.

They know it is not good for their careers and would prefer not to even grant an appointment to discuss the possibility of Lyme.

I am quite sure that at least some of them know the truth of the matter, but none seem willing to take the risks of stepping out of line to do something about the problem. In some ways I don't blame them.

They located that new lab right in the midst of a dark abyss of feigned ignorance.

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Ann-OH
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Lyme disease is not a man-made disease. It has been proven that it existed in this country and all over Europe along with other tick-borne-diseases.

I know there are conspiracy theories rampant about it. But seeing as it is spread by mice, deer, birds and people through urban sprawl, I think Mother Nature was ahead of that game.

It does need to be studied as someone could release a huge batch of infected ticks on people, infecting them with multiple diseases(including tularemia - also mentioned in the article) just as one could release malaria- or West Nile infected mosquitoes, spray anthrax dust, release rats carrying plague or valley fever etc. etc.

I just hope this lab is built in an area where accidents couldn't carry anything to people or animals in the area.

Ann - OH

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www.ldbullseye.com

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Jellybelly
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Wow! Whether man made or not, just to see a lab studying bio terrorism ranking Lyme in with ANTHRAX and CHOLERA!!!!! Tells me that there are plenty of people out there who already know Lyme is dangerous. What a world we live in.
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Andie333
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During the hurricanes earlier this fall, I posted a CNN interview with a director of a bio-terror research lab in TX.

The interview (by Rita Cosby) focused on the lab's security (or lack of it, more accurately). The director mentioned that most of the research was being conducted with ticks and other insects.

I found it pretty chilling.

As interesting reading on this topic, I recommend Lab 257 by Michael Carroll. It's about similar research conducted on an island off the coast of Long Island.

Andie

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DR. Wiseass
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As a native Texan -- the thought of a biowarfare research lab being in my great state...

well, all I can say is:

@#$% @#$# @#$%!!!!! [cussing] [rant]

And of course -- [puke] !!!!


Hugs & [kiss]

--------------------
DR. Wiseass
NOT a real doc - just a real wise  -
 -

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Lymetoo
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Disgusting and frightening. It will be spread to all the deer in the area, which number in the thousands. Of course, the deer there already carry Lyme. Now we'll have more strains of it there.....and no doctors to treat it. [rant]

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Southampton Lyre
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quote:
Originally posted by Ann-OH:
Lyme disease is not a man-made disease. It has been proven that it existed in this country and all over Europe along with other tick-borne-diseases.
Ann - OH

Ann, please don't forget, that anthrax is not a "man-made" disease either, neither is plague, smallpox, or 99% of the other most feared biowarfare agents in the world. And while the oldest reports of Lyme bacteria date back to the late 19th century, anthrax goes back possibly thousands of years.

Southampton Lyre

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lymeloco
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Anthrax is an infection caused by a bacterium (a type of germ) called Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis). Although it's most commonly seen in grazing animals like sheep, pigs, cattle, horses, and goats, anthrax can also occur in humans - although it's very rare.

In the environment, the anthrax-causing bacterium forms spores (a version of the germ covered by a hard protective shell) that can live in the soil for years. People can become infected by coming into contact with these spores through a break in the skin (such as a cut or scrape), by eating food (usually undercooked meat) contaminated by them, or by inhaling spores (breathing them into the lungs). But anthrax is not contagious, which means that it can't spread from person to person.

It's extremely unlikely that you or someone you know could get anthrax. In fact, there are usually only one or two reported cases of anthrax per year. Most of these have been in people who work with animals or animal products.

Why Are People So Concerned About Anthrax?
Anthrax that occurs naturally in the environment isn't a huge threat. But B. anthracis can be grown in a laboratory and some people are worried about anthrax germs being grown as a weapon.

The issue of laboratory-grown anthrax received lots of attention in 2001 after an anthrax outbreak in the United States. The outbreak scared a lot of people, in part because five people died (which is very rare) and also because the outbreak corresponded with the September 11 terrorist attacks. However, bioterrorism experts believe that it is technologically difficult to use anthrax effectively as a weapon on a large scale.

What Are the Signs of Anthrax?
There are three main types of anthrax:

Cutaneous (pronounced: kyoo-tay-nee-us) or skin anthrax, can occur if someone with a cut or scrape handles contaminated animals or animal products. More than 95% of anthrax cases are of the cutaneous type, which is the least dangerous form. A person with cutaneous anthrax will notice a small sore that develops into a painless ulcer with a black area in its center. If left untreated, the infection can spread to other areas of the body.
Intestinal anthrax can occur if someone eats undercooked contaminated meat. Intestinal anthrax is far less common than cutaneous anthrax, but it can make someone much sicker. Intestinal anthrax symptoms include severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, severe diarrhea, and bleeding from the digestive tract.
Pulmonary (pronounced: pul-muh-ner-ee), or inhaled, anthrax is the rarest form of anthrax - but it's also the most dangerous. Pulmonary anthrax can only occur if someone breathes thousands of anthrax spores into the lungs. Pulmonary anthrax usually seems like a common cold or the flu at first, but it rapidly turns into severe pneumonia and requires hospitalization.
It usually takes fewer than 7 days for a person to show signs of anthrax infection. And symptoms of pulmonary anthrax can sometimes take months to appear.

How Difficult Is It to Get Anthrax?
It's very difficult to get anthrax. Just being exposed to the spores or coming into contact with an infected animal doesn't mean that a person will automatically develop the disease.

For example, to get pulmonary anthrax (the type of anthrax that killed the five people in the 2001 outbreak), a person has to inhale thousands of spores. This is extremely difficult to do when the anthrax spores are found in soil or on infected animals. Even in the case of the man-made outbreak in 2001, several of the people who were exposed were found to have B. anthracis spores only in their nostrils when tested. These spores hadn't made it to their lungs in sufficient amounts to cause a problem. In other words, the people had been exposed to the bacteria but had not developed the disease.

How Is Anthrax Diagnosed and Treated?
Medical professionals can diagnose anthrax by taking samples from the skin sores or blood of people who are believed to have been exposed to B. anthracis. These samples are then sent to a lab to check whether the person has the bacteria in his or her system.

If anthrax is caught early, it is almost always successfully treated with antibiotics. Although there is a vaccine for anthrax, in the United States it is currently only recommended for people who are at risk of coming into contact with B. anthracis. They include people who work with B. anthracis in laboratories, people who handle potentially infected animal products, and U.S. military personnel. The vaccine is not given routinely to people in the United States and it hasn't been studied for use in people younger than 18.

If you worry when you hear about anthrax, remember that it's very rare, and it's unlikely that you will ever be exposed to the germs that cause anthrax. If you're worried about it, talk to a science teacher or medical professional - someone who can help you find the answers to any questions you may have about anthrax. You can also learn more from the organizations listed in the Resources tab at the right of this article.

Updated and reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD
Date reviewed: August 2004
Originally reviewed by: Frederick A. Meier, MD

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lymeloco
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ATLANTA - The federal government's chief public health agency is preparing to open a rebuilt $1.5 billion campus here, one that reflects the contradictions of a nation worried about terrorism, global calamity and death while committed to personal happiness, healthy lifestyles and environmental responsibility.


Matching the importance of its mission, the CDC's newly-renovated Atlanta campus rises in the skyline.
(ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will soon have the capacity to do five times as many experiments on smallpox virus, Ebola and other high-risk pathogens as they can now. Their laboratories are supposed to be relatively impervious to truck bombs, and it should be very difficult for strangers to get anywhere near them. Their bosses will track disasters and epidemics from a futuristic command center worthy of Hollywood's most apocalyptic scripts.

At the same time, the facility was designed to be prettier and more relaxing. There will be fewer lonely cubicles. The architecture will encourage researchers to engage in the sort of casual conversation that can spawn new ideas. Many will be able to look up from computer screens and gaze on a giant Japanese garden where captured rainwater ceaselessly flows down an exquisitely planted slope.

''We finally have world-class space for world-class people,'' Julie L. Gerberding, the CDC's director, said during a tour last week of the project's first phase.

She said that although many of the improvements are ones that ''should have been done 25 years ago,'' the overall transformation ''is a metaphor for a lot of changes going on in CDC.''

The plans for the agency's reconstruction go back more than a decade, but they are heavily colored by recent events, said William H. Gimson, the CDC's chief operating officer. ''This agency has completely changed since 9/11. The stakes are much higher, and failure is not an option,'' he said.

This year, the CDC's congressional appropriation is $7.7 billion (with some of the money going to build a drug and vaccine stockpile). It has more than 9,000 employees, with about 6,000 in the Atlanta area. In addition to offices in many states, the agency has several specialty laboratories across the country, such as the one in Fort Collins, Colo., that studies West Nile virus, tularemia, plague and other ''vector-borne'' diseases carried by animals or insects.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Adding up CDC's numbers

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total budget: $7.7 billion current allocation
Employees: 9,000 worldwide, of which 6,000 are posted to the Atlanta offices

Cost of renovations: $1.5 billion

Center's main areas of focus: emerging infectious diseases,

bioterrorism, vaccine availability and distribution, major climactic events with health implications


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



The CDC has two campuses here. The main one is next door to Emory University; a somewhat larger one is in suburban Chamblee, Ga. About 70 percent of the Atlanta-based employees, however, are in neither place. They are in about 35 rented offices scattered across the city like a load of buckshot.

The new construction will let the agency give up all but one of the rented sites and move nearly all employees to the campuses. That will provide them, and their scientific work, with greater security. It will also offer more opportunities for intellectual cooperation and cross-fertilization, Gerberding said.

There is little debate that many of the buildings on the campus are obsolete and needed to be replaced. Most of them date from the 1950s and 1960s; the main campus looks like a cluster of suburban high schools. Contemporary laboratories require much more service space for duct work, wiring and storage than they did 40 years ago, which means many of the existing buildings have been retrofitted several times.

The new buildings also reflect the evolution of the CDC's mission.

The most obvious evidence of that is the new $214 million Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory. It contains four ''biosafety level 4'' (BSL-4) suites, where researchers wearing spacesuits can work on the highest-risk germs, such as smallpox and hemorrhagic fever viruses, including Marburg, Lassa and Ebola. The CDC now has only two BSL-4 labs, and because of their design, all people using them have to work on the same microbe. A logjam of planned research dating back years will begin to break up.

Among the tasks that will get greater attention are the testing of antiviral drugs against smallpox and the search for the natural reservoir of Ebola virus - the place where the microbe hides between outbreaks.

Dozens of new labs suitable for work on less hazardous bugs will also open this fall, and many more in the next few years. Ultimately, all of the CDC's laboratories will be set back from the surrounding roads and clustered in the campus's core, where no public traffic is allowed.

Other new structures include a command center where data from around the world and in every possible form can be gathered and displayed. The CDC has been in emergency operations mode at one level or another 21 times since Sept. 11, 2001, for events such as the anthrax spore letters, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), vaccine shortages, the spread of West Nile virus and the South Asian tsunami. A new broadcast center will allow the agency to communicate with public health officers across the country - and the public - by television, closed-circuit video and Webcast.

(Published: September 1, 2005)

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Southampton Lyre
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Wow, if they can spin anthrax into a harmless disease, they can spin anything.

Pulmonary anthrax is "extremely rare" and "difficult to catch" - of course it is, unless you happen to be showered by the weaponised variety that is specially designed to reach the parts of your lungs that the natural type simply doesn't reach.

All kinds of things happen when insane scientists engineer microbes to be able to infect tissues they don't normally enter.

Here is the second major leak in 24 hours - this time from Europe. Go to the site and save it quick before they remove it:
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/2can/genomes/bacteria.html

EBI is a division of EBML, the biggest network of molecular biology labs in Europe.

On that web-page you will find a database of bacteria with a little comment on each bug. For Borrelia garinii (main cause of neurological Lyme disease in Europe), they describe it as follows:

"causes seronegative Lyme arthritis".

Say what???????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You bastards told us that there is no such thing as seronegative Lyme disease!!!!!!!!

Wow! The Steere camp is leaking like a broken bucket. Wonder what they'll do to the guy/gal who accidentally let that go online on their site, to be archived forever by the internet's search engines........
[Big Grin]

Southampton Lyre

ps - In case any Lymies from US or other non-European countries think it's not relevant to their situation, remember that one of the strains Steere used to develop the infamous CDC serology criteria was a German one.

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tequeslady
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Exactly. I live in Texas too. I can't count the times I've been told that Lyme doesn't exist in Texas. Some people kind of look at you like... yeah, right. And even if you did, it surely couldn't be that bad. It's like you're being viewed as a hypochondriac.

So many times, I've wanted several of these people to live in my shoes for just one day. Then, they'd understand.


quote:
Originally posted by Lymetoo:
Disgusting and frightening. It will be spread to all the deer in the area, which number in the thousands. Of course, the deer there already carry Lyme. Now we'll have more strains of it there.....and no doctors to treat it. [rant]


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Southampton Lyre
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quote:
Originally posted by Lymetoo:
Disgusting and frightening.

Yes, and don't miss this, which is even more important than the CDC leak, since the CDC may deny they told the Associated Press about San Antonio, but the NIH can't deny that this is up on their website:

"Are NIAID scientists already studying potential agents of bioterrorism?

Even before the current emphasis on biodefense, NIAID scientists had been studying organisms that cause a variety of infectious diseases.

Potentially, some of these microbes also could be used as ***agents of bioterrorism***. Examples of diseases caused by these agents include plague, ***Lyme disease***, rabies, tick-borne encephalitis, West Nile virus disease, influenza, anthrax infection, Ebola virus hemorrhagic fever, HIV, tuberculosis, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and Q fever.

All of this work has been carried out in either the Maryland or Montana laboratories with required safety measures in place.

www.niaid.nih.gov/factsheets/detrick_qa.htm

Southampton Lyre

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Southampton Lyre
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quote:
Originally posted by Jellybelly:
Wow! Whether man made or not, just to see a lab studying bio terrorism ranking Lyme in with ANTHRAX and CHOLERA!!!!! Tells me that there are plenty of people out there who already know Lyme is dangerous. What a world we live in.

Yes, and it's worth bearing in mind that the current Lyme Program Officer at NIH, who has always played down the seriousness of Lyme and obstructed any progress, is also the NIH's Anthrax Program Officer.

Life is full of co-incidences.

Southampton Lyre

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Aligondo Bruce
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quote:
Originally posted by Southampton Lyre:
quote:
Originally posted by Jellybelly:
Wow! Whether man made or not, just to see a lab studying bio terrorism ranking Lyme in with ANTHRAX and CHOLERA!!!!! Tells me that there are plenty of people out there who already know Lyme is dangerous. What a world we live in.

Yes, and it's worth bearing in mind that the current Lyme Program Officer at NIH, who has always played down the seriousness of Lyme and obstructed any progress, is also the NIH's Anthrax Program Officer.

Life is full of co-incidences.

Southampton Lyre

Lyme disease is hard to catch and easy to cure! Why would anyone think it had a use in bioterrorism???

LOL.

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Southampton Lyre
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quote:
Originally posted by Aligondo Bruce:
Why would anyone think it had a use in bioterrorism???

[/QB]

Well, when LDA president Pat Smith returned from her visit to the Aberdeen proving Ground and reported that the Army were making helmets with a built-in display in the visor that could tell the soldier the exact rate of Lyme infeciton in the piece of terrain he was stepping on, in real-time; and that portable PCR machines were being made, with the data to be fed into a main database via satellite link every time a soldier got bitten .......

we shoulda smelled a rat, doncha think?

Southampton Lyre

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tailz
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Personally, I don't think Lyme is manmade, HOWEVER...

I think cell phone towers and whatnot messed with their magnetic sense - I just posted in a thread about this.

They discovered that certain types of bacteria always cluster to one side of the culture dish - even if it is turned and left in the dish overnight.

Apparently, the bacteria need this magnetic sense because of tides, and we messed it up with cell phone towers.

Only a few brave researchers are researching this - most are afraid to speak up due to the economic ramifications if cell phone towers and antennas were deemed unsafe.

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bejoy
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So just what does "studying" mean?

Does it mean finding ways to cure lyme if "the enemy" lets it loose on us?

Or does it mean letting it loose on "the enemy," who incidently lives next door to our soldiers?

Or does it mean infecting "the enemy's" livestock?

All of it gives me the shivers.

You can't uninvent the A-bomb. And with a good borellia, you can't just say you're sorry and take it back either.

Either way, it comes home to haunt us.


Yesterday the city weed abatement team came by to trim down the weeds in our back alley.

Five boys with big power tools went to town and took down all the weeds, and our lovely grape vines, grapes and all. They were men on a mission.

Sometimes a group of boys with their toys can be so single minded, and so uninterested in the destructive consequences of their agenda.

--------------------
bejoy!

"Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Cobweb
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quote:
Originally posted by bejoy:
Yesterday the city weed abatement team came by to trim down the weeds in our back alley.

Five boys with big power tools went to town and took down all the weeds, and our lovely grape vines, grapes and all. They were men on a mission.

Sometimes a group of boys with their toys can be so single minded, and so uninterested in the destructive consequences of their agenda.

Jerks

Anyway- can't homeland security see that the enemy has already infilrated our ranks with bioterrorism.

H-E-L-L-O- President Bush has Lyme Disease.

BTW- what nationality is Wormser? What's the make up of the IDSA in terms of countries of origin?

Cobby
ps- and just what were you planing to do with those grapes Bejoy? [Wink]

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blazinglyme
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Hi all,

I to believe lyme is a bio war thing.

I don't know if any of u ever read about plum island... Lab 57?

They did bio war testing here and some of it escape from there and yep 1 was lyme disease and w.nile virus!

The scientist that started this was from Germany and the USA helped him escape from Hilter in WW2.

He wanted an island to do his testing and that was plum Island off of the Hamptom in NY

Here is the site for it and the show it was on

WNYC The lenoard Lopate Show... Germs in our Midst

www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/episodes/2004/03/03

There is also a book out on this too. I think it's called lab 57 or plum island.

Very interesting information here.

Best wishes to all,

blazinglyme
[confused]

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don't give up the fight

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blazinglyme
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SORRY my lyme brain made a mistake on the Lab number I put put on here

It is Lab 257

SORRY!

Best wishes to all

blazinglyme

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don't give up the fight

Posts: 49 | From Frankford, DE | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
heiwalove
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cobweb, i don't have the proof right now, and feel free to correct me if i'm wrong, but i'm pretty sure the IDSA is made up of mostly white (western) men; as are most groups who have any sort of power in this country.

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http://www.myspace.com/violinexplosion

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alliebridge
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Yes, everyone with Lyme should read Lab 257.

The US government had a biological warfare development lab headed by a head Nazi scientist.


From what I read (Lyme brain so could have read it wrong) this man didn't escape Hitler but he was the Nazi's leading biological warfare expert at that time. And then after the war the US government got him. They actually hired a Nazi essentially because of his expertise in the field of bio-warfare.

In a nutshell, the lab was in a poor location (on Plum Island off the coast of Long Island) and was not secured well so that the Lyme bacteria and different viruses got out.

The book goes into detail and is backed up by a lot of evidence, so that there is absolutely no doubt that it's the US government's fault we all have Lyme disease. [shake]

quote:
Originally posted by blazinglyme:
Hi all,

I to believe lyme is a bio war thing.

I don't know if any of u ever read about plum island... Lab 57?

They did bio war testing here and some of it escape from there and yep 1 was lyme disease and w.nile virus!

The scientist that started this was from Germany and the USA helped him escape from Hilter in WW2.

He wanted an island to do his testing and that was plum Island off of the Hamptom in NY

Here is the site for it and the show it was on

WNYC The lenoard Lopate Show... Germs in our Midst

www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/episodes/2004/03/03

There is also a book out on this too. I think it's called lab 57 or plum island.

Very interesting information here.

Best wishes to all,

blazinglyme
[confused]


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GenaD
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My grandfather was a scientist on Plum Island. We lived on Long Island and I was bitten there.

My grandfather's name is in Lab 257 a few times--what it describes in reference to his work is very true.

I have asked him if they ever worked with ticks, and he believes they did--though he personally didn't--he said that many scientists did things the others didn't know of.

When you look at how Plum Island is at the center of all the Lyme activity, it makes a lot of sense!!

--------------------
"Never underestimate the power of a few committed people to change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
--Margaret Mead

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Andromeda13
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Someone has done a research on the facts of this, it's on

www.lyme-rage.info

The writer goes into the background of the scientists involved.

Whether it was a mistake or deliberate, who knows?

Perhaps the cold war days meant that any weapon would be useful, and they were adapting the relapsing fever borrelia?

Whatever happened,the last people to know are the general public, because the psychological effects of thinking about a disease on the loose are nearly as bad as having the disease running rampant.

some recent medical abstracts for you to see below.

with peaceful wishes,
Andromeda

Med Confl Surviv. 2002 Jul-Sep;18(3):271-82.
Comment in:
Med Confl Surviv. 2003 Jan-Mar;19(1):88.

A short history of biological warfare.
Metcalfe N.
Birmingham University Medical School, Selly Oak, B29 6DX. [email protected]

Biological weapons have been used in war from the start of recorded history. This article reviews the history of the subject, including the outbreak of the Black Death and the use of smallpox against American Indians.

The new science of microbiology was misused from soon after its start and, despite the 1925 Geneva Protocol, the Japanese experimented extensively on prisoners in China. The Allies carried out extensive research during the Second World War, notably the United Kingdom into anthrax on Gruinard Island and the United States into a variety of agents.

Despite the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), a major programme continued in the former Soviet Union (leading to an accidental outbreak of anthrax).

Most recently Iraq was revealed as having an extensive programme, with weaponization of large amounts of various agents, and several terrorists groups have attempted to use biological agents as weapons.

Modern developments in biotechnology could lead to even more serious developments, and effective preventive measures, including strengthening of the BWC, are imperative.

PMID: 12201085 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Toxicology. 2005 Oct 30;214(3):167-81

History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

Szinicz L.
Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Neuherbergstr. 11, D-80937 Munich, Germany. [email protected]

Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times.

The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium.

Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community.

The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents.
PMID: 16111798 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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