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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » books to read, novels????

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Author Topic: books to read, novels????
sofy
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The last couple months I have been able to read books since before 2000. Its wonderful but now Im at a loss as to what to read next.

I went to our scaled down library, due to construction of a new one not yet even started, and took out some books of old favorite authors. Our paper used to give book reviews and I use to save them but all that stuff is gone now.

Anyone know of a sight where books are reviewed or discussed etc.

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Moose
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HI Sofy,
I am not sure what type of books you like, but being a book lover myself, you might like this one. Cruel and Unusual by Patricia Cornwell. Boy, it was so good that I could hardly put it down. It was the first book I'd ever read by Patricia Cornwell, since then I have read several others by her. I still think Cruel and Unusual is the best one. If you enjoy watching CSI shows then this is a cool read.

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Andie333
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Hi, Sofy!
I think it's so great that you're able to read again. It was also hard for me to do initially. My short-term memory was so compromised I'd find myself reading the same sections over and over again.

Also, I get overwhelmed pretty easily (that's stil the case), so I have to take nonfiction slowly.

If I want to find out more about a new title or author, I'll sometimes go to Amazon and read their customers' reviews of the books. I know these aren't critical reviews (for those, a site like Powells Bookstore is good). But I have found I frequently agree with the consensus opinions.

Right now, I'm reading a crime/mystery writer named Lee Child (his settings and characters are often military).

I'm also reading a book for my bookgroup -- Sixteen Pleasures. It's set in the 1960s, about a young woman who travels to Italy. I'm enjoying it so far. The progatonist is really likeable.

I'm also reading Healing Lyme, which is very slow-going for me.

Andie

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trueblue
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Sofy,
You could try here...
http://www.bookcrossing.com/

It's a book "freeing" site, actually, but you can search books and see what others had to say about them.

You can search by author, category, title, etc...


(Everything in the upper left hand sidebar has toggles to open up the menus.)


There are also forums (under community), one is specifically "book talk".


You could even hunt "wild" books, although it's harder than it sounds. I love the whole releasing them to the wild idea. [Cool]

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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henson2
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The "Amelia Peabody" mysteries by Elizabeth Peters - reading them in order can help, as new characters are introduced. Spunky lady archeologist with multi-purpose parasol at turn of 19th-20th centuries solves mysteries in Egyptian tombs and pyramids, meets love of her life -- full of hilarity, melodramatic send ups and real wit. [Smile]

In a number of them, a very precocious son will make you laugh until your sides hurt. And always good suspense!

Write in if you like mysteries bec. I like many others and would be glad to share.

I'm happy you can read again. It took me months and months before I could focus on a page.

Happy reading [Smile]

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AP
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I absolutely love reading... I don't really trust online sites for book information. I love browsing through the selves at Barnes and Noble.

Wally Lamb is one of my favorite authors... She's Come Undone, and I Know This Much is True are two of his books. I read them straight through.

Of course, the Davinci Code, and Angels & Demons were great by Dan Brown. (Read Angels and Demons first).

The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova had the same idea as the Davinci Code, but in this novel, they are in search of Dracula.

The Year of Pleasures (Elizabeth Berg) is a heartwarming tale about a lady who loses her husband and struggles to start anew.

Helen Fielding (author of Bridget Jones's Diary) made me laugh so hard I almost peed my pants with Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination. I strongly suggest everyone read this one. It was HILARIOUS.

I've liked every thing by Jennifer Weiner, Little Earthquakes Everywhere is her most recent, and another that I read straight through.

Alice Sebold wrote The Lovely Bones, and Lucky. Two wonderfully heartbreaking stories. Make sure you're next to your kleenex.

My last suggestion (though I could go on for hours) is A Girl Named Zippy by Haven Kimmel. This book was so memorable, I named my car "Zippy."

OK, I lied. One more. The Four People You Meet in Heaven was a book I put off for a long time. (I try not to follow the crowd). When I finally read it, I was pleasantly surprised. It was a quick read, that was very easy to follow. I ended up buying copies for everyone I know. I've gotten great reviews.

Hope this helps...

[ 14. January 2006, 07:46 AM: Message edited by: AP ]

--------------------
Sometimes when I say Oh, Im fine I want someone to look me in the eyes & say tell the truth

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shazdancer
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How about reading Amy Tan's books? We need to keep that girl in business, lol!

I recently read her latest, "Saving Fish from Drowning." A nice departure from her mother-daughter relationship theme, it is the story of a tour group kidnapped in Burma. There is a lot of humor and a lot of pathos in how Americans react to being strangers in a strange land.

I loved it!

Regards,
Shaz

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trueblue
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Sofy ~ have you tried Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series? The first is "One for the Money". The series gets funnier and funnier as it goes.

What type of book do you like to read?


Henson ~ I like the Amelia Peabody books a lot. [Smile]

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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Jillybean
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I am also a fan of Patricia Cornwell, and have
read every one of her books. Then again, her main character is a forensic pathologist, and each
book deals with serial killers.

The same goes with another of my favorites: James Patterson...serial killers again, but each chapter is ony 2-3 pages, and easy to read.

I guess it all depends on your taste.

I also recently read A Million Little Pieces by James Frey, which has become quite controversial in the news. It is a brutal recount of an addicts
recovery process in rehab. While this book is not for some people, I found it of great interest for personal reasons.

I would hate it if I couldn't read anymore....enjoy!!!!

Jill

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hiker53
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I suggest any book by Alexander McCall Smith. He wrote the No. One Lady Detective Agency and many others. Light reading and good humor.

I just finished Ann Rice's latest called Christ the King: Out of Egypt. It is a novel told in 1st person (Christ) about Jesus as a young boy. Very good.

I also recommend any book by Scott Turow, Anne Perry, Joanthan Kellerman etc. I don't know what I would do without books, since most everything else in my life has been taken by Lyme. Happy reading! Hiker

--------------------
Hiker53

"God is light. In Him there is no
darkness." 1John 1:5

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Kentucky Girl
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I would recommend the Left Behind series.

It is a 12 book series and very easy to read.

By Tim Lahaye and Jerry Jenkins. My church library and local public library have the entire series.

--------------------
Dani

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Andie333
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Hiker,
I also like Smith's novels. The detective agency is wonderful!

Andie

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tequeslady
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If you haven't read the Harry Potter books, I would highly recommend them. They take you away to another place.
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Aligondo Bruce
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'120 days of sodom' by the marquis de sade.

it's interesting because it wasn't published until the 20th century...the manuscript was lost during the french revolution, and was never complete...so what it actually is is an incomplete manuscript, complete with his notes on how he plans on furthering the plot and character development.

de sade is underrated as an author and thinker. he was a brilliant although depraved man.

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rosesisland2000
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Seems as if most of the authors that I really like are all male.

Try anyone of these authors for a good read.

David Baldacci ...if you remember the movie Absolute Power ...he wrote that one. Also, The Winner
Hour Game
The Camel Club



Carl Hiaasen ...his books are "laugh out loud" funny...one of his books was a movie, Striptease. Also wrote:
Tourist Season
Stormy Weather
Tourist Season


James Patterson I think that he has had a couple or even more of his books made into movies. And, IMO, the books are always better than the movies. IMO, his "Alex Cross" books are great reads. Some of his books are:

Along Came a Spider
Kiss the Girls
Jack & Jill
Cat and Mouse
Pop Goes the Weasel
Roses Are Red


Stuart Woods
Orchid Beach (Holly Barker Novel)
Orchid Blues (Holly Barker Novel)
Blood Orchid: (Holly Barker Novel
Capital Crimes

Lawrence Sanders I loved all the McNally's series books he wrote.

Robert B. Parker:
Widow's Walk (Spenser Novels)
Hush Money (Spenser Mysteries)
Any of the Spenser series, actually.


Ed McBain

All of the above have most of their books on "best" selling lists when they come out, and most of their writing are Mysteries.


Have fun...

[ 16. January 2006, 10:36 AM: Message edited by: rosesisland2000 ]

--------------------
Rosemary

Please pray for our troops!!!

Click here for a POSITIVE Lyme Disease website

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sofy
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Thanks guys.

I like books that if I skip over a few words I feel as if I have cheated myself out of the pleasure of reading such beautifully written prose.

If the book teaches me about another culture, people or is a political novel even the better.

By political novel I mean authors like Charles Dickens, Ayn Rand or Barbara Kingsolver. They have a political agenda and yet have the billiance to put it into a novel form so that if you arent paying attention you dont even realize you are being fed a political point of view. The brilliance of that kind of mind boggles me. The plot has to come to them that will enable you to enjoy their book and yet be fed their political agenda.

I like most of the fiction authors who won the yearly award from The National Books Critics Circle

I like books that make me laugh and will try a couple of those listed in the above posts.

I dont care for Hemingway type books that seem to suggest that we are hear to suffer and then die. If we have to suffer I like to read that we also learn how to cope and not let it define us. Poor old Hemingways books reflect the hopelessness he must have felt that caused him to end his own life. I find those a downer to read.

I quit reading mysteries more than 25 years ago when I had read so many that they all started to seem the same and I was skimming thru most of the book to just find out "who done it"

Books I loved, forgive my poor memory and mistakes
secret of santa vittoria
Secret of Santavictorria
Tai Pan
ShoGun
Stone Diaries
Louise Erdrich - any of her books
Amy Tam - same

Lots more that I cant remember right now

I spent age 13 as a home student and this is when I learned to love books. My doc introduced me and I loved my visits with him cuz we discussed bookd to read. He had his own special method of healing. He introduced me to Ayn Rand and the fact that novels can be about ideas not just plots. I found that so exciting and stimulating.

My mid 20 to 30's I had no TV and didnt miss it a bit cuz I had my books. Now I can have them again!!!!!!!

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northstar
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http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/40063#comments

(publishers weekly, 2009):
http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/ca6704595.html

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DeniseNM
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I love books!

I just finished the latest in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series, excellent historical novels that you really need to read in order. Set in 1700's Scotland and America (this last one covered the Revolution).

Also historical fiction - Phillipa Gregory.

Authors:
Linda See (Asian historical novels)
Christopher Moore (political humor)

Happy reading!

--------------------
dx: MS in 1998
2007 - Lyme suspected
2009 - Positive Lyme, MS worse. Now: Copaxone shots for MS
gall bladder out 7/09
Ceftin, Zith, Septra
LDN
Acyclovir
Monolaurin, DHEA, Pregnonelon, Curcumin

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Lymetoo
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Two excellent Christian books are The Shack and the one in my signature.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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lymewreck36
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I head up one book club and am a member for a second book club, and try to squeeze in a third for the month.

My two book club reading lists this year are as follows:


Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks.

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe.

Still Alice by Lisa Genova.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer.

The Life of Pi by Yann Martel.

The Middle Place by Kelly Corrigan.

The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields.

Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell.

Aberystwyth Mon Amour by Malcolm Pryce

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

Touching History by Lynn Spencer

Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson

Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

German Boy by Wolfgang Samuel

Agatha Christie An Autobiography by Agatha Christie

Traveling Mercies by Anne Lamott

Parliament of Whores by P.J. O'Rourke

One Thousand White Women: The Journal of May Dodd by Jim Fergus


Titles from last reading year for book club:

The Angle of ReposeI by Wallace Stegner

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

Half Broken Things by Morag Joss

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Ai Sijie

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Red Tent by Anita Diamont

Possesion by A.S. Byatt

Passage to India by E.M. Forster

Away by Amy Bloom

Queen Lucia by E. Benson

Wicked by Gregory Maguire

The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards

Bel Canto by Anne Pachett

To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham

The Welsh Girl by Peter Ho Davies

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff by Christopher Moore

A Line Between Friends by Denise VanOrt Cozzens

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Into the Wild by Jon Krackauer


O.K. I made it to about 75 percent of the book club meetings, so I squeezed in most of the titles. There is a lot of good reading here.l

Mary

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farraday
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How I envy those wonderful lists! I can read a little now, but only for a short while and then I often forget. I used to keep the local library in business!

One of my favorite authors was Jeffry Archer. His books always kept me coming back for more.

I, too, love Patricia Cornwell and Janet Evonovich. Definitely read the Stephanie Plum series...they are hilarious!

For awhile I "read" books on tape. That way I could rewind if I forgot. Very relaxing.

--------------------
DOCTOR: "I don't think you are sick."
PATIENT: "We are all entitled to our opinions. I don't think you are a doctor."

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