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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Can anyone help with Chinese translation?

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Author Topic: Can anyone help with Chinese translation?
Andromeda13
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I've been reading a Chinese site about Lyme and although it's all been translated automatically by google, it doesn't make sense.

Just wondered if anyone here would be able to look at a few sentences of the Chinese script and tell me what it really means.

Many thanks,

Best wishes,
Andromeda

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Keebler
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Sorry, I cannot. If you get no responses here, you might contact the closest university to you and ask if someone there can help you. There may also be a school of Oriental Medicine or Acupuncture near you that you could contact and they could better interpret concepts as well as words.

There was no word for lyme - no such illness in China until very recently (or they did not know that is what it might have been).

However the article below explains how they treated similar conditions for centuries. There may be some similar language on that website you're looking at. Gu Syndrome is a very distinct concept in China.

I was treated by a N.D. with this method. Unfortunately, he failed to adequately respect the nature of the spirochete, thinking that lyme was not really that unique. Still, this work is very important in many regards. You may see this mirrored at that website.

--------------

http://www.classicalchinesemedicine.org/clinicalinfo/downloads/fruehauf_gufinal.pdf

GU SYNDROME: A Forgotten Clinical Approach to Chronic Parasitism

- by Heiner Freuhauf, Ph.D., L.Ac.

=========================

Below is a site by a doctor who was trained in China - then in the U.S. - he has taken great care to study the spirochete and has taken Chinese Medicine a step farther regarding understanding the unique nature of lyme:

http://tinyurl.com/5drx94

Lyme Disease and Modern Chinese Medicine - by Dr. QingCai Zhang, MD & Yale Zhang

web site: try www.sinomedresearch.org and use "clinic" and then "clinic" for the passwords or call Hepapro through www.hepapro.com
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Robin123
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I know someone I could ask. Can you pm me with the site info? thx -

Also, re China, we have a report that there's a sign in a park in Inner Mongolia saying Beware of Ticks.

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Andromeda13
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Thank you so much Keebler.

Here below is some of the info from that web site: very interesting and useful.

Best wishes,
Andromeda


Spirochete Diseases in China and Modern Chinese Medicine

The first LD cases in China were reported in 1986, and now LD has been reported in more than 18 provinces. There is no record of this disease in the literature of TCM, but effective TCM treatments exist for five other known spirochetal diseases: syphilis, yaws, relapsing fever, rat-bite-fever, and leptospirosis.

The treatments that have been developed for these spirochetal infections can be borrowed to treat LD. Over the last forty years, Chinese medical scientists have sought to integrate TCM with modern western medicine by comparing the pharmacological effects of the TCM remedies with the physiological actions of western medicine. This integration of TCM and western medicine created a new medicine -- modern Chinese Medicine (MCM).

Based on western medicine's understanding of the etiology and pathology of these diseases, certain MCM herbal remedies, which have anti-spirochetal and anti-inflammatory effects, have been studied to treat these diseases.

Anti-spirochetal Chinese herbs have been successfully used for treating syphilis and leptospirosis in China. Syphilis was a severe illness and affected millions in China. As a result, many effective TCM herbal therapies were developed for treating this disease.

Smilax glabrae Rhizoma (SG), as a major ingredient of the herbal formulas, is used to treat syphilis and achieves a greater than 90 percent sero-convert rate back to negative. Even for the late stages of syphilis, the cure rate is above 50 percent.

Leptospirosis is transmitted through contaminated water in the rice paddies in China. In poor rural areas, barefoot farmers work in the rice fields and epidemics of this spirochete disease affected millions of farmers in China. Smilax glabrae Rhizoma has been studied as a preventive treatment for leptospirosis. Out of 2,000 people tested, the incidence rate of a pre-treated group compared with a control group was 1:5.58 -- a statistically significant result, demonstrating that taking SG can successfully prevent leptospirosis.

In recent years, the active ingredients listed below have been identified, and gone through both animal studies and human clinical trials. They were tested and found to kill the spirochetes in leptospirosis, and have been used clinically to treat leptospirosis in China: Allicin, an active ingredient of garlic; Decanoylacetaldehyde, an active ingredient of Houttuyniae Herba (HH); Coptin, an active ingredient of Coptis chinensis Radix, Smilax glabrae Rhizoma, and Scutellariae Radix, etc.

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Pinelady
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http://babelfish.yahoo.com/


http://www.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

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Keebler
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Andromeda13 ,

Thanks for posting that as I was curious as to what might be written about lyme for a site from China. I recognized it and searched the title so that I can see who wrote it. It was one of the authors I posted above. Good to see that.

Here's the link to that article on the author's US website:

http://www.sinomedresearch.org/ld/treatment/SpiroMCM.htm

From: Lyme Disease and Modern Chinese Medicine - by Dr. QingCai Zhang, MD & Yale Zhang

Home page: http://www.sinomedresearch.org
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Andromeda13
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Hi Pinelady,
Thanks for the info.

This is what the yahoo site babelfish came up with, and the second one was worse, so it will probably take someone with knowledge of Chinese to make sense of it. It's quite funny really!

e sensitive anti-sparse helicoid immune body initially sieves the experiment. *Adaptation card: Chronic walks randomly the red spot, the skin benign Lymphatic tissue to increase falls ill, the lymphocyte meninx rhizitis, the carditis, arthritis, the chronic atrophy acrodermatitis and nerve sparse spirochetosis. *Blood serum outset degree of dilution: 1:10(IgM),1:100(IgG).

Best wishes,
Andromeda

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Robin123
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I love this one: chronic walks randomly the red spot [lol]
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jennyflyer
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I have a friend who is Chinese/Filipino, I'll ask him to translate it.

--------------------
Jennifer

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Keebler
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I think that site has an English language twin. There may be no translation necessary if it's from the Sinomedresearch site link I posted above.

However, if that is just an excerpt from a much larger site, that is different.
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