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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » baking with sugar substitutes

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bill+1
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I am burning out on salads and rice . Doc wants me on sugar , glueton and nightshades free diet.

Ineed info on sugar subs. that I bake and make jelly with and not end up with a runny mess .

Any info is welcome , my taste buds are screaming !! [lick] BILL

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Wishing us all well !

Posts: 99 | From Southern Illinois | Registered: Feb 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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No matter how you do it, baking usually produces foods that are high on the glycemic index.

How about freezing your fresh berries and eating whole, with a touch of STEVIA (a plant sweetener)? It's always better to eat food in the whole form when possible.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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Here are some good cookbooks - adaptations can be easily made with these.

==================

www.christinacooks.com

CHRISTINA COOKS - Natural health advocate/ chef, Christina Pirello offers her comprehensive guide to living the well life.

Vegan, with a Mediterranean flair. Organic.

She was dx with terminal leukemia in her mid-twenties. Doctors said there was nothing more they could do. Among other things, she learned about complementary medicine and she learned how to cook whole foods. She recovered her health and is now a chef and professor of culinary arts.

She has program on the PBS network "Create" a couple times week. Check your PBS schedule.

To adapt: in the rare dishes where she uses wheat flour, it can just be left out for a fruit medley, etc. Brown Rice Pasta can be substituted (Tinkyada or Trader Joe's).

Regarding her use of brown rice syrup, just leave it out and add a touch of stevia at the end.

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www.rickbayless.com

Rick Bayless is a very good chef for MEXICAN meals that are healthy. These are heavy on vegetables.

====================

http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/

Spoonful of Ginger site

Books: http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/pages/books.php

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER (1999)

From Nina Simonds, the best-selling authority on Asian cooking, comes a ground-breaking cookbook based on the Asian philosophy of food as health-giving. The 200 delectable recipes she offers you not only taste superb but also have specific healing . . . .

. . . With an emphasis on the health-giving properties of herbs and spices, this book gives the latest scientific research as well as references to their tonic properties according to Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, the traditional Indian philosophy of medicine. . . .

You can find this at Amazon, too.

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http://www.simply-natural.biz/Cure-Is-In-The-Kitchen.php

THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN, by Sherry A. Rogers M.D., is the first book to ever spell out in detail what all those people ate day to day who cleared their incurable diseases . . .

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http://www.ecookbooks.com/p-4293-from-curries-to-kebabs.aspx

FROM CURRIES TO KEBABS - RECIPES FROM THE INDIAN SPICE TRAIL - by: Jaffrey, Madhur

==========================

Mediterranean Diet (minus the wheat and the wine) is also good. Quinoa and pomegranate juice can be substituted.

Also look up Black Forbidden Chinese Rice here:

www.LotusFoods.com
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bill+1
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thanks Keebler for the tips . I may try some of these . have to get em checked out.

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Wishing us all well !

Posts: 99 | From Southern Illinois | Registered: Feb 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
grandmother
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Why nightshades free?
Posts: 919 | From CT | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
massman
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In some people I believe nightshades can lower thyroid function.
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Keebler
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For some, nightshades are suspected as causing (or exasperating) joint inflammation and pain - arthritis symptoms.

On the flip side, the tomatoes are simply a marvelous package for some very powerful nutrients.

I went off nightshades for a while but saw no difference so now can enjoy them all, especially tomatoes and red bell peppers. And cherries are actually helpful for many with arthritis.
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Keebler
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http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=62

Overview - the basics about nightshade foods

. . . Potatoes, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, eggplant, tomatillos, tamarios, pepinos, pimentos, paprika, cayenne, and Tabasco sauce are classified as nightshade foods. . . .

Pharmaceutical nightshades

. . . The best-known nightshades when it comes to pharmacy include mandrake (Mandragora officinum), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and belladonna, also called deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna). . . .

Nightshade vegetables and fruit

The most famous food members of the nightshade family include potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum), many species of sweet and hot peppers (all species of Capsicum, including Capsicum annum), and eggplant (Solanum melongena).

Less well know, but equally genuine nightshade foods include ground cherries (all species of Physalis), tomatillos (Physallis ixocapra), garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasum), tamarillos (Cyphomandra betacea), pepinos (Solanum muricatum), and naranjillas (Solanum quitoense).

Pimentos (also called pimientos) belong to the nightshade family, and usually come from the pepper plant Capsicum annum. . . .

. . . Although the sweet potato, whose scientific name is Ipomoea batatas, belongs to the same plant order as the nightshades (Polemoniales), it does not belong to the Solanaceae family found in this order, but to a different plant family called Convolvulaceae. . . .

Nightshade spices

The seasoning paprika is also derived from Capsicum annum, the common red pepper, and the seasoning cayenne comes from another nightshade, Capsicum frutenscens. Tabasco sauce, which contains large amounts of Capsicum annum, should also be considered as a nightshade food.

It may be helpful to note here that black pepper, which belongs to the Piperaceae family, is not a member of the nightshade foods.

Excerpt:

Some researchers have speculated that nightshade alkaloids can contribute to excessive loss of calcium from bone and excessive depositing of calcium in soft tissue.

For this reason, these researchers have recommended elimination of nightshade foods from the meal plans of all individuals with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other joint problems like gout. . . .

. . . Practical tips

First, if you are an individual with existing joint problems like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout, temporary 2-3 week elimination of nightshade foods from your meal plan may be a worthwhile step to determine if these foods could be contributing to your joint problems.

This same recommendation would apply to individuals with existing nervous system problems, particularly nerve-muscle related problems.
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Lymetoo
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Nightshades cause me PAIN! If you have pain, bill, stay on it for at least 6 wks to see if it helps.

Artificial sugar is a really bad choice, sorry to say!!

Use stevia when possible in order to sweeten things. You could make smoothies with it, if you could find a recipe. Try yogurt and berries, with stevia.... go from there.

But be careful not to eat too much fruit or you will have yeast to deal with.

Drink green tea with stevia when the sweet tooth strikes or granny smith apples.

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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bill+1
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I thank all of you for the information . Doc wanted me off the inflamatories I been on for osteoarthritis and off nightshades for a while .

Makes sence to see what happens . So far the joint pain has been bad but I'll stick with it for 6 weeks like ya said TuTu . BILL

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Wishing us all well !

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Lymetoo
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Sadly, it may be hard to tell if the nightshade diet is working when you're herxing!!!

Happy 4th!! [Smile]

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95817 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Richard1062
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Bill,

For baking, use stevia as a sweetener, you only need a little bit. Then put some unsweetened applesauce in the recipe, to make up for having taken out all the sugar. It's a texture thing.

Sometimes we cheat a bit and use agave syrup instead of stevia, it really tastes good.

I think I remember that I started out using 1/2 cup of applesauce in place of 1 cup of sugar. It keeps your baked goods from being totally flat and strange. Now I just sort of guess on the amounts, and it comes out fine.

Use whole wheat flour, not white.

Good luck with it.

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Richard1062
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Oops, just remembered you are gluten free too. Try using millet flour. It tastes ok, and it's not as grainy as rice flour.

Don't buy the gluten-free flour mixes because they contain potato starch.

Posts: 228 | From Mass. | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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