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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » My son just diagnosed with diabetes!

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Author Topic: My son just diagnosed with diabetes!
nefferdun
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My 22 year old son went to the doctor because of a yeast infection covering his tongue that has not gone away for a year and then frequent urination. His fasting blood sugar was 189 so they did another test and that one was over 160.

He goes back for another test tomorrow. I am so worried. He is the picture of health. He is slim, has always be athletic and strong and never eaten a lot of sugar. I am terrified it is Type 1 and uncontrollable.

Does anyone have experience with this? I feel so depressed I don't know how I am going to wait until tomorrow to get answers. He is very worried to, feels his life will never be the same. He is doing interviews for dental school and worries that they might not accept him because of it.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Lymetoo
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Oh man. That is awful!! I do so hope it is Type II. That's bad enough!!!

He's lucky (smart) that he got diagnosed. More damage could have happened had he not found out now.

Hugs to both of you. Keep us posted on what you find out.

[group hug]

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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Dental School cannot deny someone for a dx of diabetes. Diabetes can usually be controlled. sometimes, it can even be reversed.

I dated a guy in high school who had Type I diabetes and it never stopped him from any activity, although he took shots, he just took his little kit with him everywhere. He went on to college and then to grad school and to have a normal adulthood.

Infections can cause diabetes. As he has a yeast infection, is that from abx? Does he have lyme? As lyme attacks the whole endocrine system (and that includes the pancreas which is deficient with diabetes), lyme can make us more susceptible to diabetes.

Adrenal support is key in that case to reduce stress from infection. That, in turn, helps the pancreas and the entire endocrine system.

======================

This book is specific to lyme and other chronic stealth infections. The author discusses the endocrine connection and effects of STRESS on a person with such infections. You can read customer reviews and look inside the book at this link to its page at Amazon.

Note: even slim people can be affected by what he calls the "potbelly" regarding the inside of their arteries, etc.
------------------------

http://tinyurl.com/6xse7l

The Potbelly Syndrome: How Common Germs Cause Obesity, Diabetes, And Heart Disease (Paperback) - 2005

by Russell Farris and Per Marin, MD, PhD
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[ 11-09-2010, 06:06 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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Gymnema Sylvestre has been a near miracle for me in helping to keep my blood sugar down. It's amazing, really. Adrenal support along with that also supports pancreatic function.
-----------------

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

Gymnema Sylvestre - 141 abstracts

=======================

This author has had Type I diabetes since the age of 11. Middle aged now, in excellent health, he mentions his methods a few times throughout the book and in our past conversations. Surely diabetes can turn our lives around but, with the right tools, it need not stop us or even slow us down.

From a fabulous book, "The One Earth Herbal Sourcebook" (Tillotson, et.al.):

http://tinyurl.com/5z2klz

GYMNEMA (Gymnema sylvestre). . . is bitter in taste, and cooling in action. It improves blood sugar control in diabetics, numbs the taste of sweet completely (for about 20 minutes), and decreases appetite (for about 90 minutes).

. . . Should not be used by people with low blood sugars (hypoglycemia). . . .

. . . Gymnema actually means "sugar destroyer." It grows in the wild forests of central India, all the way to Western Ghats and up to the Himalayas.

Research indicates that gymnema stimulates insulin secretion or release of insulin from the pancreas. Japanese studies have shown that it improves glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes, and other studies show that the effects can last for up to two months after discontinuation.

This herb is a good long-term tonic for Type I and II diabetics. Results are best seen after long-term administration, over six months to a year. I prefer to use it in combination with several other herbs for blood sugar control, because it affects only a few aspects of the imbalance.

In case you're curious, sugar tastes like sand for twenty minutes after you chew on a little gymnema. . . .

- Full chapter at link above. And you can also search the book for ``Diabetes'' for a gold mine of more information.

=====================

http://www.vrp.com/ArticlesSearch.aspx?k=Gymnema

Search results for Gymnema: 6 articles

(Other beneficial supplements are also included in most of the articles).

===================

http://www.itmonline.org - ITM

Search: Gymnema - 2 articles, one on interaction with drugs

Search: Diabetes

- Eight pages of links, the top three focus on ``Treatment of Diabetes with Chinese Herbs . . . ``

======================

This is the formula my ND suggests:

http://www.acuatlanta.net/gymnema-capsules-p-18480.html?osCsid=753b4cc3d371e8f224053b6ccded731e

Ayush Herbs - Bio Gymnema

You can read the Ingredients here, too.

========================

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35099601/ns/health-diabetes/

Avoid extremes in diabetes control, study warns

Driving blood sugar down too low can be as risky as leaving it too high

Jan. 27, 2010

LONDON - Moderation appears to be the best approach to controlling blood sugar in a form of diabetes that affects many adults, researchers said Wednesday, since lowering it too far can be as risky as letting it stay too high. . . .

- full article
-

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Keebler
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

Curcumin, diabetes - 127 abstracts

============================

etc.
-

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Keebler
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Only a very few MDs work (or are trained) regarding the use of nutritional supplements to support a patient who has diabetes. Here's how to find NDs, and others who are trained in such methods:

If certain herbs or supplements are tried, it's best to first have all the tests to know WHY diabetes has left its calling card. Sometimes, it can be helpful to have imaging of the pancreas, etc.

===================================

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/2/13964?

Topic: How to find a LL ND (naturopathic doctor), acupuncturist, etc.

Includes how to find an ILADS-educated LL ND, an Acupuncturist, a doctor of Oriental Medicine (O.M.D.), or a doctor of Ayurvedic Medicine (D.Ay.), certified herbalists or nutritionists, etc.

================================

To find holistic MDs, DOs, DCs:
---------------------

http://www.holisticmedicine.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=131

The AHMA was founded in 1978 to unite licensed physicians who practice holistic medicine. . . .

* American Holistic Medical Association (AHMA)
* American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM)
* American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM)
* International College of Integrative Medicine (ICIM)

-----------------

http://www.holisticmedicine.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=118

Find a Holistic Practitioner

Physicians, Licensed Professionals, & CAM Practitioners
-

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Misfit
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I have a nephew in his early 30's who has diabetes. I'm not sure which kind, I know he does take a medication to control his blood sugar levels.

He's *supposed* to be watching his diet, but he's not very good at it. The medication is keeping his blood sugar at a good level.

I keep harping on him about his diet.

I'm hoping for the best for your son..he will probably have a long, happy life with maybe some modifications.

Please keep us updated....

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nefferdun
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Thanks everyone. He does not have lyme. We would know because there are no deer ticks; the wood tick is carrying it and it would be hard to get bitten by one of them and not know it.

I know that alpha lipoic acid and acetyl l carnitine is good to regulate blood sugar so I am giving him that. Today we have really focused on low carbs. I hope the test tomorrow is better. I will look up everything recommended.

This is just too scary. I hope the doctor can ease his fears tomorrow. We need to make an appointment with an endocrinologist as he just went to a clinic and he said the person didin't even know how to prick his finger for the first test and the second test they could not find a vein. He came home with bandaids all over him. It would be so nice if they messed the test up and he is ok but they sent it to a lab so probably not.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Keebler
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About the low carbs, to control blood sugar, complex carbs are good that digest more slowly. Lentils and moderate amounts of whole grains are best, in the complex carb category, to go along with vegetables to help them last longer.

A strict low carb diet can be too severe for those who need longer lasting foods. Complex carbs are not necessarily known as low carb but they can make up a meal that is low to moderate on the glycemic index - meaning they have a slower absorption rate than food that are just typically known as low carb that can drop someone an hour or two after a meal.

The overall gylcemic effect of a meal or snack is more important than it being low carb, although the definition and distinctions can be a bit fuzzy.
-

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Keebler
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http://newsletter.vitalchoice.com/e_article000992918.cfm?x=bbVV2P3,b7b1jv7h,w

Beans and Lentils May Deter Diabetes

. . . Beans are the best food source of resistant starch: in general, the starch in beans is about evenly divided between slowly-digested starch and resistant starch. (Whole, intact grains are also substantial sources of resistant starch . . .

==============================

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=52

LENTILS (from Whole Foods website)

. . . Not only do lentils help lower cholesterol, they are of special benefit in managing blood-sugar disorders since their high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising rapidly after a meal. . . .

. . . Lentils, like other beans, are rich in dietary fiber, both the soluble and insoluble type. . . .

. . . Lentils' contribution to heart health lies not just in their fiber, but in the significant amounts of folate and magnesium these little wonders supply. . . .

Lentils Give You Energy to Burn While Stabilizing Blood Sugar

In addition to its beneficial effects on the digestive system and the heart, soluble fiber helps stabilize blood sugar levels.

If you have insulin resistance, hypoglycemia or diabetes, legumes like lentils can really help you balance blood sugar levels while providing steady, slow-burning energy. Studies of high fiber diets and blood sugar levels have shown the dramatic benefits provided by these high fiber foods.

Researchers compared two groups of people with type 2 diabetes who were fed different amounts of high fiber foods.

One group ate the standard American Diabetic diet, which contains with 24 grams of fiber/day, while the other group ate a diet containing 50 grams of fiber/day. Those who ate the diet higher in fiber had lower levels of both plasma glucose (blood sugar) and insulin (the hormone that helps blood sugar get into cells).

The high fiber group also reduced their total cholesterol by nearly 7%, their triglyceride levels by 10.2% and their VLDL (Very Low Density Lipoprotein--the most dangerous form of cholesterol)levels by 12.5%. . . .

- full page at link above.
-

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Keebler
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http://www.livestrong.com/article/155649-nutrients-in-steamed-black-rice/

BLACK RICE - Nutrients in Steamed Black Rice

Excerpt:

Benefit: Protection Against Diabetes . . .

Black rice is a whole grain with low glycemic value.

You metabolize it slowly and are not subject to the unhealthy blood-sugar spikes or uptick in blood triglycerides that contribute to type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is increasing nationwide.

In the June 15, 2010 issue of the New York Times, Roni Caryn Rabin's article "Eating Brown Rice To Cut Diabetes Risk," describes a new report from Harvard University that says you can decrease by 10% your chance of getting type 2 diabetes by eating two or more servings of brown rice every week, compared to eating it less than once a month.

Black rice, mentioned above as sometimes called brown rice, provides this benefit as well. . . .

- more detail through link above.
-

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nefferdun
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Thanks Keebler. He like whole grains and nutritious foods so he won't have to be converted to them. I am sure he will like lentils too. My husband bought me some organic lentil apple soup which was delicious. I can get some for him to try.

I don't know what black rice is unless you mean wild rice. He likes brown rice. It is easy for him to not eat sugar.

I don't know why this occured. When he was young he was overweight until 8th grade, then abruptly dropped it all and was skinny. He is 6'4" and has just started to fill out a year ago.

Since childhood, he never ate a lot of sugar so I do not know how it could be type two. He said his diet in college was not very good. Maybe that was it. I wonder if he did much drinking.

His girlfriend enjoys cooking but she is not health conscious.
The night he was diagnosed she served "brown rice" which was instant. . . and egg rolls.

I had a wild rice/brown rice mix cooked and in the refrigerator and i wanted so much to replace hers with mine but refrained. When he was real skinny she used to make all kinds of deserts for him trying to fatten him up.

If anyone should have diabetes it is my husband who has always hidden bags of candy all over the place. He would make himself cookies in the middle of the night and eat most of it by morning.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Keebler
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Black rice is not the same as wild rice. Links below.

Would he and his girl-friend enjoy taking a couple cooking classes together? (Oh, my . . . sugar to fatten him up? Ohhhh.)

If your husband is interested, Gymnema Sylvestre helps stop sugar cravings. When I'm taking that, I don't crave it at all. Magnesium helps, too. And, sauteing an onion with as many foods as possible will also help stop sugar cravings.

========================

www.LotusFoods.com

Black Forbidden Chinese Rice -- & the Red Bhutanese Rice. The nutritional content is excellent and these will help fill and fortify you, even in moderation, along with lots of vegetables.

-------------------
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_og_wild_wehani.aspx

Wehani & Wild Rice (Organic)

-----------
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_nf_japonica.aspx

Black Japonica

---------
http://www.quinoa.net/181.html

Quinoa Recipes

----------
http://www.quinoa.net/4600.html

Red Quinoa Recipes
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Keebler
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To help get over sugar being the main "flavor" of desire:
----------------------------

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/find-eat-drink/spices-chefs-love-to-use_b_772205.html

SPICES CHEFS LOVE TO USE

Slideshow of some chefs' favorite spices, mixtures.

1. Chef Ana Sortun cooks Mediterranean-inspired food at her restaurant Oleana in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She loves the spice mixtures from La Boite a Epice.

http://www.findeatdrink.com/Index/Purveyors/Entries/2010/8/12_laboiteaepice.html

LA BOTE EPICE - CUSTOMIZED SPICE BLENDS


2. New York's La Fonda Del Sol chef Josh DeChellis likes Pimenton de la Vera (smoked paprika) to add to dishes to give it a Spanish flair.

3. Chef Joji Sumi of Mezze Bistro and Bar in Williamstown, Massachusetts in the Berkshires, melds Asian and French flavors with local, seasonal ingredients. His spice choice: Togarashi.
It's a blend of Asian peppers, citrus, sesame seeds.

4. Chef Jose Garces of Garces Group in Philadelphia and Chicago creates his own spices.

5. Chef Jehangir Mehta of Graffiti and Mehtaphor in New York uses turmeric, chili powder and onions when he cooks his Indian-inspired food.

6. Chef Michael Anthony of New York's Gramercy Tavern opts for simple. Basics like sea salt enhance flavors without hiding them.

7. Chef Joshua Whigham at The Bazaar by Jose Andres in Los Angeles uses cinnamon for his playful and sophisticated cuisine.
Cinnamon is an underused spice. When cooking with cinnamon, it adds an unbelievable depth of flavor to any foods you are cooking.

[poster's interjection: cinnamon also helps balance blood sugar]

8. Michelin starred chef Gary Danko of Gary Danko in San Franciscos uses coriander for both sweet and savory preparation.
Coriander adds an intriguing fragrance and character. It plays an important flavor in savory duck confit, as well as other ethnic dishes and spice blends.
-

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nefferdun
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THanks for all the information. i know cinnamon is supposed to help with blood sugar. I just thought of that today, and I think coconut oil is good too. I am going to look for the black rice.

I was thinking about a cooking class too but we would have to travel about 100 miles round trip. We could probably get the black rice at the same place they teach cooking. I think we would all benefit. My cooking is healthy but boring.

My husband is an alcoholic, has not had a drink in 26 years but still craves sugar. He has always hidden things so I don't know if my son may have been hiding a drinking problem as well.

It just makes no sense for him to have diabetes when he is so thin, does not eat a lot of sugar and there is no history of type 1 diabetes in our family - only diabetes connected to alcoholism or obesity, both of which are related to sugar.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Lymetoo
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Neffer... Did he find out which kind of diabetes he has?

I think sometimes, diabetes just "happens." Just had a thought though. Isn't celiac disease one thing that predisposes a person to diabetes?

Maybe he's a celiac too.

www.celiac.com

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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nefferdun
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We haven't found out yet which kind it is. He took another test yesterday which is supposed to give an average of his blood sugar over the last three months.

For some reason they have not referred him to an endocrinologist.

Edited as I am an emotional mess;

i think I am going through the grieving process. First denial, thinking it must be a mistake and then anger at everyone that may have contributed in some way. Now just despair.

His last fasting blood sugar was 210 and his average for the last three months was 260.

He has to travel this week end and he has not been put on any meds or even seen an endocrinologist yet. i don't even know if it is really safe. Will his blood sugar make him feel more anxiety in his interviews? Should he tell the interviewers?

[ 11-11-2010, 09:50 PM: Message edited by: nefferdun ]

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Karen Mc
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Hi Sweetie,
I havent been on much lately as I havent been doing too well but I just ran across your post...

I am so sorry and am praying for you and your son.

Please keep us posted on how he is doing and please PM me if you just want to talk or vent.

I will try to keep a check on my messages.

God Bless!

Karen

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Keebler
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NO, he should not tell the interviewers, unless he starts to feel ill during an interview and then only that he has to attend to some blood sugar issues, in a very positive way of taking care of himself.
-

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Holsky
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Hello! I'm new here. I ran across this post and wanted to come by and say something. My brother is a Type 1 diabetic. He has been a diabetic since he was 14 years old. At first, he was angry about it, but through love and prayer he has learned to deal with it. Some people think it's something that was done to cause diabetes like "they just ate too much sugar!" But that isn't the case with Type 1. My brother has never been someone to eat alot of sweets. My family has had to deal with people saying things like that. My brother is now 28 years old. He has a pump that regulates his sugar. He also helps others with understanding diabetes. With a diet and keeping up with your sugar, you can live a relatively normal life. The key is to find a good endocrinologist and someone who is compassionate. I say that because we all know too well how uncompassionate doctors can be.

Edited to explain: Type 1 diabetes is caused by multiple autoimmune disorders but the most common is a viral infection like strep throat.

Something to encourage: The QB for the Chicago Bears has adult onset of Type 1 diabetes.

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nefferdun
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Thanks again everyone. The doctor that referred him to an endocrinologist (Dec 8 earliest) said he probably has Type 1.

I bought a book by Suzy Cohen which is very helpful. It explains a lot that Keebler was trying to tell me - and everyone else for so long, concerning dairy and gluten among other things.

Some type 1 diabetes is caused from milk causing an autoimmune reaction destroying the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. I want him to take the test for it as well as gluten intolerance.

I am one of those people that leaps into action trying to find out everything I can and do everything possible to get well - even some of my horses have been cured of severe problems from diet changes and supplements.

But it is hard to get someone else to follow my advice. He won't even take the Alpha Lipoic Acid I gave him. The doctors in this area are so backwards I dread to hear what they tell him.

There was a study at Georgetown University that found a vegan diet greatly reduced the blood sugar of diabetics. If he was still a little boy he would be on a vegan diet to see if it helped but he is an adult now. You know how that is!

I found black rice, Keebler, and I love it.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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Keebler
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Hey, I see you are off to the "City by the Bay" tomorrow. Good luck.

Glad to hear you found the black rice. I've been out of it for couple weeks and my recent store delivery forgot it. I forgot how much I have come to depend upon it.

I made a wonderful dressing out of it a few weeks ago with all the same onions, celery, seasonings & spices as a bread dressing. Wild Rice is also good or buckwheat groats - or a combo. I think the whole grain dressings are so much better than the bready ones. No residual Macy's Day Parade flat effect (bloating) from it, either, as from the bread stuffings.

Keep your same recipe for all the flavor, just change the main flavor carrier.

Thanks for that book title.

Wonder if your son would be interested in talking with this author?

He has had Type I diabetes since the age of 11. Middle aged now, in excellent health, he mentions his methods a few times throughout the book and in our past conversations.

http://tinyurl.com/5z2klz

"The One Earth Herbal Sourcebook"
-

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