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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Orthorexia

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Author Topic: Orthorexia
Life+Lyme
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Has anyone had issues with disordered eating since having Lyme and starting treatment? At what point does trying to eat healthy and avoiding certain foods get into a bad situation?

I'm having issues being hypervigilant about food. I have an obsession with avoiding certain foods, and I think it is only getting to be a wider and wider pool of food.

I know you all may think it's good to understand what food is healthy for you and what food is dangerous, but where should I draw the line? Suggestions?

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/orthorexia/MY00768

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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girl
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What all do you avoid?
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Keebler
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It IS important to consider all this:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=029690;p=0

Excitotoxins; MSG; Aspartame; & "Natural" Flavors;

GMO foods that destroy the GI Tract; Gluten; Dairy.
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Life+Lyme
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It started off with avoiding junk food, but now it is the majority of food. I am not saying it's bad I have a knowledge and vigilance about the quality of food, but the obsession isn't good. I don't know how to do things any different, though.

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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Keebler
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How it is an obsession to avoid putting junk into our bodies and eat only real food? It's a commitment.

How is it an obsession to avoid foods if we know that we know they create trouble for us (gluten, dairy, corn, soy)?

Processed "food" is not really food after it's been processed - it's been literally worn out by machines and striped of its nutrients.

Same with GMO products. GMO foods can create some terrible trouble for a body.

Those who call it an obsession to be committed to a diet of healthful food show signs of bullying and not being able to understand . . . or they may just have money tied up in such food industry stocks.

Look who brings us this new "term" someone at Mayo - where they can't understand much of a complex nature when it comes to chronic illness in the first place but where they also

want to peddle pharmacueticals forever. Those who rely on processed foods will "need" to be on far more pharmaceuticals to compensate for pain, bloating, depression, that these additives can cause.
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KentuckyWoman
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Obsession, No
Vigilant, Yes

There is so much JUNK out there and even more junk disguised as "good for you."

I like the "Eat Clean Diet Plan" by Tosca Reno to get started. Basically, if God didn't make it, then don't eat it.

NOW we have all the problems with GMOs and foods swimming in everything poisonous like pesticides.

I'm fighting the battle this month of trying to identify and acquire organics and avoid the hidden GMOs in EVERYTHING it seems.

No, I'm not obsessed. I want to get well and protecting my liver and my body starts with what goes into my mouth, then what I breath, etc.

Knowledge is power, not obsession. [Smile]

I understand your question about "where should I draw the line?" I have this same question. I draw it, when the task gets too overwhelming. I take a break, then push forward to learn more. I can't learn everything in a day or month.

Each week I try to achieve a goal or two. This week, I am working on ideas for Lyme Awareness Month coming in May. Our local lyme support group is planning a push for education.

I am also focusing on preparing meals while I have energy that are as "close to healthy" as I can get for my situation of ignorance vs education.

Don't stress too much.. remember.. that stress is also bad for liver toxin buildup. go for small victories a few at at time. Don't try to take on the entire food chain at once.

That's my strategy anyway.

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KentuckyWoman
tired of medical run-arounds

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
~ ~ Robert Frost

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KentuckyWoman
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If you are getting to a point where you feel like you just "CAN'T" eat anything,

and you are truly feeling like you have a real "disorder" as you call it... aka.. true orthorexia...

a disorder that involves "quality" of food and not "quantity" such as with anorexia or bulimia, then I recommend your really try to sort that out with a professional.

I doubt any of us on here could really encourage or help you if it is a TRUE eating disorder.

Best of wishes for your health and wellbeing.
kw

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KentuckyWoman
tired of medical run-arounds

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
~ ~ Robert Frost

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Keebler
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KentuckyWoman,

Agreed. Perhaps there has been a misreading on my part.

Anorexia is not what I'm talking about - and I did not think they were, either. The blurb from the link posted - I thought - was talking about people who did not want to eat food that has been processed or certain food groups that may cause sensitivies.

Maybe I did not read enough and maybe they spoke later about anorexia, which is quite different from the way I thought they described their new term.

There are many who think that if they give up foods that are packaged that there is nothing more to eat, though.

It can take a while to figure out what to do with food in is orginal state. I actually remember such a time when I had to avoid anything package and felt so lost. then I got to know real food.

Guess I need to go back and read more about that book. But the title is not about anorexia, that I thought was said early on. I thought.
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Life+Lyme
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Thanks Keebler and Kentucky woman.

I think you guys raise a great point that while ER should do our best with what we put in our bodies, we have to give ourselves a little bit of a break. The pressure of having a perfect diet isn't healthy, either.

Yes, Keebler, I am referring to more of a disordered state of eating. Maybe I shouldn't have included the new term or the Mayo link...sorry for the confusion.

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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Keebler
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A perfect diet, if defined as not eating toxins, is a good goal. They author(s) clearly say that is wacko and they are talking about those who want "pure food" - I do not agree with their stance on this at all and they are singling out those who just want not to be fed junk.

From that link above:

These individuals fixate on eating foods that make them feel pure and healthy -- to the extent that they avoid foods with any:

Artificial colors, flavors or preservatives

Pesticides, genetic modification

Unhealthy fat, sugar or added salt


For some people with orthorexia:

Preparation techniques must result in "clean food," meaning it's been washed multiple times, cooked to ensure no bacteria and minimally handled.

Eating out is out of the question because it's important to avoid food that they don't buy and prepare.

(end quote)
----------------------

Well, they obviously have not read the ingredients in fine print (or just not publicized) on some of the foods at restaurants.

Still, most who are health minded will know the restaurants that serve good food.

I think they are unfairly targeting those who are just wanting to keep junk out of their bodies. Even one meal of junk can have profound effects. I've had seizures from making assumptions in restaurants regarding the additives.

Avoiding stuff that has profound effects is just wise. The authors don't seem to undertand that.
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Keebler
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What that kind of food can do:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=029690;p=0

Excitotoxins; MSG; Aspartame; & "Natural" Flavors;

GMO foods that destroy the GI Tract . . .
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beaches
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Life+Lyme, I am concerned that you use words/phrases like ``disordered eating'' ``hypervigilant'' and ``obsession'' when it comes to food choices. You indicate that this is becoming worse, with a wider and wider pool of food being affected and that you are avoiding the majority of food.

I think your issue goes beyond just avoiding junk food, GMOs, etc.

I am not a health professional, but I would recommend that you seek some sort of counseling/medical attention for this situation. Best of luck and health to you.

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lpkayak
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when my 10yo daughter was dx the llmd wanted her on yeast free, gluten free and a whole bunch of other no nos.

she was a size 0...her teachers were worried about her...before lyme i wasnt that worried cuz i saw her eat alot-she was just growing fast-she ended up being 6'

but when she started the "lyme" diet on top of meds that needed to be kept cold and snacks every 3 hrs cuz she was hypoglycemic...i saw her one day staring at the fridge and saying-"im hungry but im not allowed to eat anything"

i just decided that as long as she didnt eat junk i needed to keep the pressure off her

she already ate pretty healthy -but i put gluten and dairy back in and it helped things.

she wasnt anorexic...yet...and i didnt want to go there. she had so much stress about taking her meds to school etc...

i think it was right. she eats really healthy now, exercises, and she did respond to the lyme tx

me...im a whole other story. and im going thru some wierd change in the last 2 weeks...i cant even describe what is happening to me...but i know it freaks me out trying to find "clean" food when the air and water and soil are all polluted...

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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Life+Lyme
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Thanks for all the input. Yeah, I need to work on things.

Lpkayak, thanks for telling me about your daughter's story. It's hard just feeling like I can't eat anything, and then it spirals to the little food I can eat. Sorry you've had a rough past couple weeks!!

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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Keebler
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As we move away from additives that are literally drugging our brains to crave more & chemicals that do not belong in food . . .


There are hundreds of vegetables, dozens of seeds and grasses that are used as grains and are naturally gluten-free (amaranth, millet, buckwheat groats, brown, red, black and wild rices - regular, red and black quinoa)


and many way to get protein. We might try duck as, just a duck breast can be bought and prepared in a way that is quite lean enough. Lamb and Buffalo offer unique nutrients and flavor.

All kinds of legumes can expand our world, expecially when we add lemons and limes and tomatillos - and garden herbs and spices.

Guacamole with tomatillos is amazing.

We can make our own HUMMUS in a variety of ways.

BABA GANOUSH is so easy and can also be varied. Both of these require no chewing and are easy on any tummy.

Nuts, too, round out food from the earth. All kinds of nut oil, and even avocado oil can bring new life to a recipe.

Think if all the food that grows for us - and has for thousands of years.

There is no need to limit foods to the same things day in and day out.

I bet we could try a new vegetable each day without repeating for many months - even from what our local farmers can provide.

Zuchinni and parsnips with ground corriander - and lemon eggs make a wonderful breakfast. A little wild rice on the side, with more corriander & hazelnut oil starts my day today.

Getting to know dozens of garden herbs and spices from around the world will open up a world of flavor to us.

Make dates (really, call then and ask for some guidance) with the produce manager at your market -- or the director of ALL your area FARMERS' MARKETS.

Maybe visit area farms. Go see where your eggs come from at the free range farms.

Today, everyday: Saut an onion. Add Ginger & Garlic and you have a fabulous start to whatever else you want to add to that.

Just Saut an onion and you are a chef. Olive Oil, even Butter in moderation (again, real foods that have been around from before there were even grocery stores).

Onions, garlic, ginger, etc. can be sauteed ahead of time and frozen in small sturdy glass jars in the freezer. (Best to always avoid plastics).

Once that aroma fills the air, flavor can bloom. And this enhances our exeperience - helps us fall in love with food - real food.
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Keebler
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SOUPS, NOURISHING SOUPS

[not sure if all the recipies in this book are gluten-free but, obviously enough are - or are easily adapted - as to wind up on this gluten-free blog]


http://www.glutenfreecat.com/category/healthy-living/

Book Review of:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936608677/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1936608677&linkCode=as2&tag=glufrecat-20

Ladled: Nourishing Soups For All Seasons - by Kimberly Harris (December 18, 2012)

over 50 reader reviews, a near perfect composite 5 star rating.

http://www.glutenfreecat.com/ - not the book author but a book blurb on this other site:

I'm a curious girl, wife, teacher, friend, fitness fanatic, gluten-free foodie, health food nut, child of the King, and Mama Cat to two amazing little creatures. I love gluten-free cooking and baking and want to share my successes and failures with you. Follow me, and I'll take you on my gluten-free journey!
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Keebler
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Both also very flavorful adventures in nutrition:


THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN

&

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER
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Life+Lyme
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Thanks for all the helpful info, Keebler!

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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Keebler
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For eating out, Google "SLOW FOOD" or "slow food movement" and your location.

Google may also help find the organic (or close) restaurants nearyby -- and I'm sure there is way to find which local (organic or nearly so) farmers supply which restaurants in your area.

"Local" food movements are sprouting up all over the place (har-har).

By finding good establishments this way, we are more likely to avoid chemicals and additives and also support those in our home towns and regions. These kinds of places keep the money at home and also offer a deeper community connection.
-

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lpkayak
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i realy like what LL doc JW says in this video

he talks about Bb "controlling your mind" to eat sweets and carb s cuz that makes Bb stronger

he also talks about eating whole, unprocessed foods. organic and better yet your own garden food

i think it is about 30 min in and then 45 min in...the beginning is slow and boring so FF

http://www.autismone.org/content/parasite-paradigm-complex-paradigm-lyme-borreliosis-and-chronic-infections-dr-jeff-wulfman

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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Life+Lyme
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Yes, I can't help but thinking the bugs are playing a role in my distorted cravings and appetite. Little boogers!

Thanks for the suggestion, Keebler. I hadn't thought of that, but it makes sense!

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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Razzle
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B complex and chromium can help control sugar cravings, as can candida treatment.

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Life+Lyme
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Oh ok, good to know Razzle! Thanks

--------------------
You name it, I've got it.
Full-time medical anomaly.

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