LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Need dog-training tips

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Need dog-training tips
linky123
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19974

Icon 1 posted      Profile for linky123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
We adopted a pound-puppy a couple of months ago.

She is a great dog, very smart, sweet disposition etc.

The only problem is, she herds everything and everyone. She reminds me a lot of the blue and red heelers I knew when I lived out in Wyoming.

Now, I know this is 'normal' behavior in some dogs, but she is kind of rough on our older dog and too domineering for our neurotic dog.

Since this seems to be in her DNA, I am having a hard time breaking her of it. She is quite stubborn!

Any advice?

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

Posts: 2607 | From Hooterville | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kgg
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5867

Icon 1 posted      Profile for kgg   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I would look for a person who works with dogs, like a dog trainer. Perhaps your vet has someone to recommend? Even if it is in her nature there are probably things that can be done that a trainer would know about.
Posts: 1600 | From Maine | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
linky123
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19974

Icon 1 posted      Profile for linky123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
kgg, I think you are right. She is a handful. I was hoping I could do this myself without having to pay someone to help me.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

Posts: 2607 | From Hooterville | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treeinatree
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 38613

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treeinatree     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you can teach her some herding related commands, you can have more of an on/off switch for it.
Posts: 146 | From South | Registered: Aug 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dogsandcats
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 28544

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Dogsandcats     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you check community centers, they sometimes offer group classes. Although that might not be the right thing to do....your doggie would have everyone running laps..

I looked on line but didn't find a great link.

Ask your vet for ideas or a name of someone who isn't pricey.

Good luck!!

--------------------
God will prepare everything for our perfect happiness in heaven, and if it takes my dog being there, I believe he'll be there.

Billy Graham

Posts: 1966 | From California | Registered: Oct 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
linky123
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19974

Icon 1 posted      Profile for linky123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks everybody for the advice.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

Posts: 2607 | From Hooterville | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
healthywealthywise
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 8595

Icon 1 posted      Profile for healthywealthywise     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
With our new pup, this ebook has been a godsend!
I hope the link works for you?
Not sure if it helps w/herding but still has a lot of good info pet owners should read.

http://www.dogstardaily.com/files/downloads/AFTER_You_Get_Your_Puppy.pdf

Posts: 867 | From PA | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
healthywealthywise
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 8595

Icon 1 posted      Profile for healthywealthywise     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here is another site that talks specifically about herding dogs.....

Hope it helps?
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?A=1959

Posts: 867 | From PA | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 11290

Icon 1 posted      Profile for randibear     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
randi was a very very active puppy. we always made sure she had treats that she could chew on.

also we used off to spray on shoes and cords so she wouldn't chew them. worked.

and labs are notorious for eating, ummm, poop. we had to dump pepper on the piles. and we cleaned the cat litter box several times a day.

whew, that was no fun, but she grew out of it.

we just kept her so active she was exhausted by the time she went to bed.

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
linky123
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19974

Icon 1 posted      Profile for linky123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
healthywealthy, thanks for the links. I just skimmed them for now, but will take a closer look tomorrow when my eyes are not so tired.

randi, wearing them out is a great idea. Only, problem is, she wears me out long before she is worn out. [bonk]

She would be great at that agility training stuff, but I have no clue on how to train a dog to do that.

I do think it would be fun to try it tho'.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

Posts: 2607 | From Hooterville | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The second link was very interesting, healthy/wealthy!

I wish I could have taken my border collie to agility training. They started classes in my area right about the time my dog passed away.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95725 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
linky123
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19974

Icon 1 posted      Profile for linky123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
tutu, I know how much you must miss her. Border Collies are the dog of choice for the agility type stuff aren't they?

They are so smart.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

Posts: 2607 | From Hooterville | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
nefferdun
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 20157

Icon 1 posted      Profile for nefferdun     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
We adopted a border collie but she is the one getting mauled by our mastiff/lab puppy. The collie is very sensitive and sweet. She loves to play ball so that might help your dog settle more and take away some of that energy.

Our puppy was mauling the cats, eating poop and jumping on people scratching and biting them. I got a training collar for him. It was the only way to keep him from hurting us. The collars have a pager that sends out a vibration.

The electric stimulation goes from 0 to 127. Usually the vibrator is all I need to remind him to stop doing what he is doing. I have used the shock set at 30 a few times when he is biting the collie and won't stop. He just shakes his head, looks at me and then quits.

I can take him on walks off leash and he is very good, not eating horse poop and coming when called. It really has made a difference.

It can be a dangerous tool, not to be used in anger. I tried clicker training first and that made no impression at all. I feel this is the best way to protect my cats and the collie, who is older, as well as company that come over from being jumped on, bitten and scratched. He is a very big dog.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

Posts: 4676 | From western Montana | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.