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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Life Insurance?

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Author Topic: Life Insurance?
firefly999
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Anyone have success getting life insurance after a Lyme diagnosis? I am starting the life insurance search and would like any pointers or success stories!
Posts: 5 | From Pacific Northwest | Registered: Jun 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
firefly999
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Or denial stories [Frown] The more information the better!
Posts: 5 | From Pacific Northwest | Registered: Jun 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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I got mine before I knew I had Lyme. (whew!)

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 96217 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lostlyme
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So far for me aflac No,
Posts: 238 | From Where | Registered: Aug 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
steve1906
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Some will, some will deny you & some will charge you much more than the avg.

Read these post from 2009 on Lymenet, may help a little.
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/86901?

Steve

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Everything I say is just my opinion!

Posts: 3529 | From Massachusetts Boston Area | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
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no but I had mine cancelled because a doctor, who didn't believe in lyme, told them I was suicidal.

try getting any insurance with that. I can't.

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
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Its so awful that such arrogant ignorant people have so much control over our lives

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
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Has anyone tried the aarp place where age and dx are not supposed to matter

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
firefly999
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thanks for the responses. & thanks for the link Steve. I read something on here years ago that said about the same thing.
The companies will deny for lyme. I can't see not telling them about it, but I thought I read if you don't tell them about an illness and die from that illness they won't pay benefits, but would they pay if you died of something else?
Still hoping there are some companies that will cover & which ones they are.

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steve1906
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I wouldn’t lie to any questions on the application, to risky.

They’ll find a loophole to not cover you if you die from anything.

Don't forget, they have very good lawyers on their side.

Here's some post @ links from "2011" on life ins.
What a crazy world we all live in!
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/113044?

Steve

--------------------
Everything I say is just my opinion!

Posts: 3529 | From Massachusetts Boston Area | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GretaM
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Got mine before lyme dx.

Also, sometimes the questions are very specific. Mostly smoking drinking lifestyle choices etc.

If possible, just go the bare bones on the questions.

"Do you exercise daily?"

A simple "Yes" or "No" will do. Do not elaborate that simply getting out of bed and showering is full aerobic exercise.

Lol. At least it is for me.

I have avoided travel insurance for this reason. I am not sure if they are able to look at prescription history. If one does, then it will be awfully tricky to explain all the meds without spilling the beans.

Another option...don't use lyme disease, use one of the many misdiagnosises.

Migraines
IBS
IC
Anemia
Seasonal Allergies
Panic Attacks
Psoriasis excema

(going through my list as an example).

I don't appreciate how when we need meds, the entire planet denies the existence of lyme disease.

But when we need insurance, all of a sudden lyme disease exists.
[group hug]

Posts: 4358 | From British Columbia, Canada | Registered: Jun 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
steve1906
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Your Drug Prescription History May Affect the Cost of Your Health Insurance

Just updated today June 26, 2014>

When you apply for health or medical insurance, there will be a number of judgments used by the underwriters to determine how much they will charge you to insure you. Since, by law, they can no longer refuse to insure you (as of passage of the Affordable Care Act), they must instead determine how much it will cost to pay for your care, which they then add to the amount of profit they expect to make, too. The total will comprise your health insurance premium.

In order to make those judgments, they will purchase data from a variety of sources; data that has been collected about you and your health which you were probably never aware was being collected. Among those pieces of data will be your Medical Information Bureau report, your credit score, your prescription history and your medication adherence score.

Most of us have no idea that anyone besides ourselves or our doctors, is keeping a history of our prescriptions. In fact, that history can be purchased by insurers and others from two companies. The IntelliScript database (produced by a company called Milliman) and the MedPoint database (produced by a company called Ingenix) both track this data, then sell it to health, disability and life insurance companies.

Since the information pertains to individuals' health and care, both these companies are required to adhere to HIPAA laws. They cannot sell or share the information without your permission. However, in order to apply for health insurance, you are required to give that permission.

To pull this data together in a form that they can sell to insurers, IntelliScript and MedPoint purchase information from Pharmacy Benefits Managers (PBMs). PBMs range from your corner pharmacy (which is probably part of a larger chain) to large mail order pharmacies like ExpressScripts or CVS Caremark. When you fill your prescriptions at any of the PBMs, they are able to track who your doctor is (and therefore what his or her specialty is), the drugs and dosages your doctor has prescribed for you for any reason, whether or not you filled the prescription, and whether or not it was refilled.

From that data, they can draw a number of conclusions:

•They can figure out what your diagnosis is, or at least a close proximation, and therefore whether you have (or had) an acute problem (one that will go away) or a chronic problem (which will either recur on occasion, or bother you for the rest of your life.)


•They can also tell the extent to which your diagnosis affects you by the strength of the dosage or how often your doctor thinks you should take it. An acute problem may not bother you anymore, so it won't cost them much money, if anything. But a chronic problem, like diabetes or heart disease, even just high blood pressure, may get very expensive over time. When they see chronic problems that are at all advanced, it will be a clue to the underwriters that they need to project even more cost to the company, and raise your premiums accordingly.


•They can determine if you have comorbidities, meaning, more than one thing wrong with you. The combination of medical problems can cost them even more than the cost of treating each problem individually. For example, the cost of treating heart disease and cancer at the same time can be more expensive than treating heart disease in one patient plus cancer in another patient.


•The data will reflect how regularly you fill your prescriptions and therefore, whether or not you are adherent. This is information similar to that projected by FICO's medication adherence score which the underwriters may use to compare. If you are adherent, of course, your drug prescriptions will have a cost they can project. But it may also tell them, depending on your diagnosis, that you are controlling the problem and therefore that there won't be bigger costs in the short term that are not anticipated.

•The underwriters will also look to see if you have been prescribed pain drugs for any length of time. If you needed them a few years ago but haven't filled a prescription for them recently, then there won't be additional expense.

But if you are currently taking pain pills, and if the dosage has increased either in strength or frequency, it will be a red flag to the underwriters that that they need to raise the cost of your premiums. They may try to assess if you are abusing the drugs, for example. Or they may decide to charge you more for even bigger problems which may result if you continue seeking care for your pain, or even more expense in pain drugs.

There may be other conclusions these companies draw from the use of your prescription history, too. And over time, as more and more information becomes available from additional sources like loyalty reward cards, underwriters will judge additional aspects of how you lead your life, and price their insurance premiums accordingly.

Unfortunately, it makes no difference if their conclusions and judgements are, or are not, correct. And the cost to you will be based on those conclusions, no matter how wrong they might be.

There is little or nothing patients can do to protect themselves from this information except to make sure it the prescription history data is correct. Since it is used to determine the cost of your insurance, both IntelliScript and MedPoint must, by law, adhere to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA.) That means that, just like your credit score, you can request a copy of your pharmacy history report for free from either of these organizations once a year, or at the point you are turned down for life or disability insurance.

It makes sense then, if you are in the market for health insurance, that you obtain a copy of your medical records (all records, not just your pharmaceutical history), review them carefully, and correct any errors.

To get a copy of your IntelliScript pharmacy history report, call 877-211-4816.

For your MedPoint report, call 888-206-0335 or write to:

MedPoint Compliance
Ingenix, Inc.
2525 Lake Park Blvd.
West Valley City, Utah 84120

http://patients.about.com/od/healthinsuranc1/a/Your-Drug-Prescription-History-May-Affect-The-Cost-Of-Your-Health-Insurance.htm

Steve

--------------------
Everything I say is just my opinion!

Posts: 3529 | From Massachusetts Boston Area | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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I'm sure they could find out if you did not tell them you had lyme. If you died of ANYTHING, and they find out you lied about ANYTHING, it's null and void.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 96217 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
firefly999
Junior Member
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Well that's a lot of info.
I talked with one company today and they said Lyme is not on their list of medical issues. We'll see how they respond the the neurological symptoms I've had in the past. Also someone PM'd me and told me they were approved for life insurance with a diagnosis of Lyme as well.
Hope the exam portion of the interview goes well!

Posts: 5 | From Pacific Northwest | Registered: Jun 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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