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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » New- Excellent- Study By Sapi, Liegner, et. al.

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Author Topic: New- Excellent- Study By Sapi, Liegner, et. al.
Tincup
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
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Another AMAZING Study by Eva Sapi & Company!

Note that Dr. Liegner is also an author!

Good combo- good results!

We owe them many thanks for all of the hard work they do!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31614557

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www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

Posts: 20332 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tincup
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
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In comparison, I just saw this nonsense with Wormser & Aucott joining forces!

Quote- "Reliable blood biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Lyme disease in patients with erythema migrans are needed."

HUH? If you have the rash, a blood test isn't necessary!

And as a side note...

To read the full useless article by Wormser & Aucott you must BUY it!

I just posted a wonderful article above by Eva Sapi & Dr. Liegner, et. al. and it was free to all and very helpful!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31618575

Easy to see tell who are the ones truely helping us and the ones who watch us suffer as they rake in the dollars.

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www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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Keebler
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Thank you.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MADDOG
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Very good.
And the last but not least thing Lyme does is turn into a virus to avoid ABX,then turn back into a bacteria when the coast is clear.

MADDOG

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Ann-Ohio
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Thanks TC!
This one is a very interesting case study. I like the nice long list of co=authors. You can see where they work if you click on Author Information.
And the total text is free! Might be a good one to show doubting doctors.

Or maybe just print to this link and summary:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31614557

" In summary, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that B. burgdorferi can persist in the human body,

not only in the spirochetal but also in the antibiotic-resistant biofilm form, even after long-term antibiotic treatment.

The presence of infiltrating lymphocytes in the vicinity of B. burgdorferi biofilms suggests that the organism in biofilm form might trigger chronic inflammation."

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Ann-OH

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TX Lyme Mom
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quote:
Originally posted by MADDOG:
Very good.
And the last but not least thing Lyme does is turn into a virus to avoid ABX,then turn back into a bacteria when the coast is clear.
MADDOG

I used to wonder if bacteria could turn into viruses, but I've never seen anything in the medical literature suggesting this possibility. Do you have any reliable reference to confirm this statement?

Please understand that I'm not trying to contradict you nor to put you on the spot. My motive for asking is for my own personal knowledge. I do not have a strong background in biology. (I used to be an elementary school teacher with an "advanced sixth grade background in Simple Science.")

If anyone else can answer this basic question, please help us out.

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Bartenderbonnie
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Thank you so much for posting this Tincup.
I know you know the back story to this case.

Thank you to Dr Eva Sapr, Dr L, and others 💚
The patient's name was Vicki Logan. Her case has been widely publicized. She was Dr L 's patient. He never gave up on her and wrote a book about this amazing Lyme warrior;
Vicki Logan continues to this day in helping other Lyme sufferers.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81pIydrREEL.jpg

"The Long-Term Persistence of Borrelia burgdoferi Antigens and DNA in the Tissues of a Patient with Lyme Disease"

Abstract;
Whether Borrelia burgdoferi can persist for long periods of time in the human body even after a long clinical course and after long-term antibiotic treatment.

Human autopsy tissues were obtained and investigated from a 53 year old female from Weatchester County, NY State. This Lyme patient recieved extensive antibiotic treatments over the course of her 16 year-long illness. Autopsy tissue sections of the brain, heart, kidneys, and liver were analyzed.
Significant pathogicalchanges including Borrelial spirochetes clusters were found in all the organs. The cluster aggregates were contained in a well-established biofilm.

Analyses show significant numbers of infiltrating inflammatory CD3 and T lymphocytes cells present next to the B burgdoferi biofilms.

In summary,we provide several lines of evidence that suggest the B burgdoferi can persist in the human body, not only in the spirochetal but also in the antibiotic-resistant biofilm form even after long-term antibiotic treatment.

The presence of CD3 T lymphocytes in the vicinity of the B burgdoferi biofilms suggest that the organism in the biofilms might trigger chronic inflammation.

Clnical History;
39 year old woman is evaluated by one of the authors, Dr L in 1989
2 year history of spastic paraparesis, cranial nerve palsied and abnormal large number of lymphocytes in CSF.
Patient lived in highly epidemic area of Lyme, Westchester County, NY.
No history of tick attachment or EM rash
Testing of Lyme disease was entirely negative
Splenectomy was performed in 1976
Patient was a well-functioning and highly valued pediatric intensive care nurse prior to falling ill
She did not have any pets

Patient was treated for 21 day I.V. Cefotaxime in April 1990
Minocyccline for 4 months
A 'pulse' regimen of Cefotaxime in Jan 1992 weekly fior 13 weeks and intensified for 10 more months
IV antibiotic treatment was discontinued, she deteriated and transferred to Mayo Clinic in MN
In Jan 1993, she was given 10 day IV cefriaxone followed by oral prednisone steroid for 6 weeks
In May 1993 she deteriorated
Treatment with 109 continuous days of IV resulted in dramatic improvement and enabled her to walk
Daily IV cefotaxime was continued for an additional 3 months
In the ensuing months off treatment, she once again deteriated

Changes in the patient's insurer's policies for reimbursement prevented further antibiotic treatment and she deteriorated
She often failed to satisfy CDC criteria for 5 out of 10 CDC specific IGG bands

Patient filed lawsuit againest her insurers for declining treatment throughout her illness, lost, appealed, lost;
(The suit was ultimately settled out of court, the terms of which were sealed. Whatever the settlement was, it did not include any acknowledgement of Vicki's right to be reimbursed for costs of treatments.)

https://www.leagle.com/decision/2000462275ad2d1871429

Donated IV Ceftriaxone (3x week) provided by the manufacturer in 2000 and March 2001, with some hiatuses showed no benefit

Following another change in her insurance to public health benefits, IV cefotaxime was applied for 3 weeks in May 2003 but was suspended because of lack od reimbursement

While attempts to secure means of reimbursement were underway, on July 6, 2003, patient suffered from seizure disorder
Patient was transported by ambulance to local hospital
After discussion with hospital physicians and next of kin, a DNR order was issued
Shortly after patient died

Pathological findings of brain, CNS, PNS, heart, kidneys and lungs showed biofilms of B burgdorferi spirochetal clusters surrounded by CD3 and T lymphocytes which caused local tissue inflammation.

Frontal cortex and subcortical white matter were most severely affected in brain
Spinal cord cord shows servers degeneration
The heart sections of left and right ventricles showed fibrous scars
The liver showed marked lymphocytes cell inflammation
The kidneys had large biofilms of B burgdoferi spirochetal clusters

All organs had evidence of B burgdoferi spirochetal clusters and aggregates ( multi biofilm bateria micro-organisms in a colony).

Biofilms are responsible for long-term persistence.
Biofilms protect bacteria from antibacterial therapy.
Biofilms are surrounded by CD3 lymphocytes, which cause inflammation.

Our recent studies demonstrated that only certain antimicrobials and a combination of antibiotics are able to reduce the size of borrelia biofilms (stevia, bee venom, and melliltin.)

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Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
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Bonnie, Your post is so very helpful, and it really wakes me up in many ways I cannot even voice right now . . . (and thanks so much for breaking up the text into readable portions, that's such a help!) . . .
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Bartenderbonnie
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 49177

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Thanks Keebler

When I read the full text, I knew I had to write a back story.
I cried over this, it broke my heart.

This happened to a REAL person, sometimes that gets lost in medical literature and jargon. She did not need to die.

Forever grateful for all the Lyme warriors that came before us.
So important to give back and help others once we are able.

You are the BEST example of this. 💚

Posts: 2151 | From Florida | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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