LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Sex and Lyme

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Sex and Lyme
Cathy DeVoe
Member
Member # 11271

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Cathy DeVoe     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi Everyone,

So we all know this lyme affects us in every area of our life.

My husband has been trying to understand all this stuff but medical stuff is greek to him.

What he has heard is I have at least 7 co-infections from late stage lyme.

Toxic, detox, neuortoxins, infections, abx. These words scare him and seeing how sick I have been and what I am going through.

Basically he is afraid to have sex with me because he is afraid of getting sick. Even with a condom.

He worries that with the abx bringing out the co-infections he is more at risk.

My LLMD says there is no risk because the infections are in my tissues and muscles and not airborne.

But we have read other articles on this subject.

What do any of you guys know about this?

Thanks for all your help with such a sensitive subject.

Skooch

Posts: 88 | From Carnation | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treepatrol
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 4117

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treepatrol     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hes probaly already got it.It just hasnt shown up yet. [Frown]

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SForsgren
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 7686

Icon 1 posted      Profile for SForsgren         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately, no one really knows and he may have good reason to be concerned. That said, if it is transmitted between people, he likely already has it. I don't think we know at this point.

--------------------
Be well,
Scott

Posts: 4617 | From San Jose, CA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kendrick
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 10990

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kendrick     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I doubt he has it, unless you contracted it at the same places your husband visits(your home
---> he got bit too). Otherwise, after 100 years of Lyme disease and definitely sex, humankind would now be extinct.

--------------------
Never walk through a cornfield backwards.

About me(Yahoo): http://360.yahoo.com/profile-NR1Y8cw6fqhtrewwItSlfsgQDIhaOojd

Posts: 315 | From Florida | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I Lyme about 35 years ago before I was married. We've been married for 22 years and hubby shows no signs of it ... and we don't use condoms.

I think that if your hubby was going to get it from you, he'd already have it.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SForsgren
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 7686

Icon 1 posted      Profile for SForsgren         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
No signs does not mean he does not have it. I know people that had no "signs" and still tested positive for Lyme. It may just be that it takes some longer to become ill but that they later have some neuro-degenerative condition such as ALS, Parksinson's, Alzheimers, etc.

I would not take absence of proof to equate with proof of absence.

--------------------
Be well,
Scott

Posts: 4617 | From San Jose, CA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Blackstone
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9453

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Blackstone     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My LLMDs do not believe in sexual transmission. For all the people who have Lyme, many have spouses that show no signs or symptoms.

Scott - do you mean tested positive on an IgeneX Western Blot? This is a problem with antibody tests. Just because you "test positive" doesn't indicate active infection. Do you have anything to suggest the lyme would "jump" right to ALS/Alzheimers, instead to going through the normal path of acute infection > entrenched chronic infection etc... if it was a normal tick bite? Shouldn't someone get fatigue, CFS or Fibro type symptoms first? It just doesn't seem likely that someone could be infected sexually and not display any of the symptoms of acute or chronic lyme. While Lyme may be one cause of Alzheimers, there are many others out there so we can't relegate the fact someone gets Alzheimers 20 years down the road directly to Lyme. At this point, I don't think we can even make the connection with an antibody response, as opposed to antigen present.

I'm not saying don't be cautious, but there's a certain point at which "better safe than sorry" diminishes quality of life severely.

Posts: 685 | From East coast, USA | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mommy*of*3
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 11688

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Mommy*of*3     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
FWIW, I don't have any published statistics to send you, but out LLMD said that in the married patients he treats, over 90% of spouses also tested positive for lyme via Igenex lab tests. If one family member tests positive, he recommends all family members be tested. It is entirely possible that it is sex. transmitted, but again, I have no published data for you. Just my 2 cents.
Posts: 101 | From USA | Registered: Apr 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Geneal
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 10375

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Geneal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My hubby and I both have Lyme.

I was dx. first in Oct. of last year.

He was recently diagnosed this past April.

I never saw a tick on me while he can recall at least two tick bites.

I think I am at greater risk of him giving it to me (I believe it has been found in sperm)...

However, at this time it is basically a moot point.

Either we are too sick, too tired or just not interested (decreased sex drive due to Lyme).

I have a neighbor who has now recognized that he has probably had Lyme for over 30 years.

His wife is completely asymptomatic.

I know this doesn't really help your situation.

We are all afraid of the unknown....

I hope to get back to a "normal" relationship with my husband....soon.

Hugs,

Geneal

Posts: 6250 | From Louisiana | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it's probably true that most families all have Lyme. I don't think it's necessarily because of person to person transmission. Most families spend time together in the same places.

I think I'm the exception rather than the rule in that I know I was exposed before we were married, or had even met. I can believe that over 90% of spouses test positive, but I'd bet this is due to spending time together in the same tick infested places.

My husband shows absolutely no health problems whatsoever. He rarely even gets sick. I agree with the poster that it would be highly unusual for him to be perfectly healthy then all of a sudden come down with something serious due to latent Lyme.

Even though I lived more or less healthy for years, I still got infection after infection. I still battled fatigue and brain fog. I was a health nut and on supplements because they helped the way I felt. I was aware of detoxing for the same reason. I had some symptoms, but nothing even worth treating.

I'm not saying sexual transmission isn't possible. But I do think Lyme would be far more epidemic than it already is if it was common.

Out of five kids I've given birth to, only one shows any kind of symptoms at all and we know that it can be passed congenitally.

Are the rest asymptomatic or did their immune systems fight it off right at exposure? Does my husband have it and has fought it off, or did he not get it at all?

Along the same line of thought, why are some here so much sicker than others? Why do some take so much longer to heal than others?

This isn't just a cut and dry topic with a simple answer. In fact, I think overall with this disease, we have more questions than answers.

I still stand by what I said, if your husband was going to get it from you, he'd already have it.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Just Me
Member
Member # 11827

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Just Me     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Perhaps Borrelia is sexually transmitted, but we simply don't know. If it is possible, then it may be only happening rarely.

Of course Borrelia has adapted to transmission via ticks and vertebrates, so it doesn't need sexual transmission like T. pallidum.

Posts: 30 | From Here | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tincup
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5829

Icon 7 posted      Profile for Tincup         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
From memory.. I think it was at the last LDA conference in Philly...

It was told that the keets can be in hiding .. I want to say 20 years... before they bing bang boom.

It may have been 15 years.. but I THINK it was 20 years. Don't quote me on the years.. but it was documented.. and it was a lot longer than the 10 years I originally knew about.

I also know the health department's stand on this is..

If it hasn't been documented, it can't be so.

As far as I know they have NEVER EVER EVER looked. So much for brains!

[lol]

If it were me.. and what I DO tell others is..

Better safe than sorry.

Until we have absolute proof it CAN'T be... treat it as if it were a sexually transmitted disease... as it IS the cousin to syphlis and we know it can be transmitted to babies from the mother.

And who know...

Next month the "proof" could be there. Either way.

But with the minimal research being done on Lyme.. chances are it will take a number of years before it would be documented.

In the meatime.. a bottle of wine and some hot-to-trot pj's might help?

[kiss]

PS.. Some of the research to locate keets or evidence of them was done on the foreskin remnents of circumsicisons.

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

Posts: 20353 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymied
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6704

Icon 10 posted      Profile for Lymied     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
TinCup - You crack me up!

I am glad I wasn't one of those researchers with the foreskins. Can you imagine arriving at work in the morning with your coffee to a row of those waiting for study??!!?? YIKES!

--------------------
Pride is concerned with who is right. Humility is concerned with what is right. - Ezre Taft Benson

Posts: 655 | From NC, Exit 88 on the Deer SuperHighway | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vanilla
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Just wondering did that research show anything? I mean besides the obvious?????
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MariaA
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 9128

Icon 1 posted      Profile for MariaA     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymied:
TinCup - You crack me up!

I am glad I wasn't one of those researchers with the foreskins. Can you imagine arriving at work in the morning with your coffee to a row of those waiting for study??!!?? YIKES!

and also, where in the world did they get enough exposed-to-Lyme foreskins to do a study???????

eew.

--------------------
Symptom Free!!! Thank you all!!!!

Find me at Lymefriends, I post under the same name.
diet: http://lymefriends.ning.com/group/healthylowcarbrecipes
Homemade Probiotics thread
Herbal Links Thread

Posts: 2552 | From San Francisco | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Searching4Answers
Member
Member # 11079

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Searching4Answers     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I personally believe it is common sense that it is not transmitted sexually, OR it would be an epidemic of untold proportions! Everyone, and I mean everyone would have it. Unless it is like AIDS, where it is transmitted sexually but only when there is an opportunity for it to be spread (don't want to get graphic).

Just a thought.

I know I was not having sex at all when I was infected! (Damnit! Wish I was!)

Posts: 69 | From Washington | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treepatrol
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 4117

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treepatrol     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I personally believe it is common sense that it is transmitted sexually its a epidemic of untold proportions!
 -
Transmission Fleas Mosquito's Food Etc

Transmission Etc


Black Flies & Lyme

Non Tick Transmission

Transmission Art Doherty

Babesiosis/Lyme & Blood Transfusion

Sexually Transmitted ???

Tansmission through sex

Sex Question--serious--adult content


sexual transmission

Is LD contgious via sex?

is our saliva contagious?

About sexual tranmission

You Tell Me

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treepatrol
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 4117

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treepatrol     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Borrelia in mosquitos

Zakovska A, Capkova L, Sery O, Halouzka J, Dendis M.
Department of Comparative Animal Physiology and General Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno, Czech Republic. [email protected]

A total of 662 samples (winter period: 469; summer period: 193 specimens) of female mosquitoes of the genus Culex, Aedes and Anopheles were collected during the period March 2000-April 2001 from the locality of Vysoke Myto (Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic). They were examined by dark field microscopy for the presence of spirochetes. The motile spirochetes were observed in 4.2 % of all species of investigated mosquitoes. One spirochetal strain out of the 8 isolation attempts (BRZ14) was obtained (cultivation rate was 12.5 %) and the spirochetal strain was then successfully cultivated and identified using PCR for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., and subsequently with the RFLP as genomospecies Borrelia afzelii. This strain was derived from overwintering Culex (Culex) pipiens biotype molestus female mosquitoe. This is apparently one of the sporadic cases of the occurrence of pathogenic borreliae in haematophagous arthropods, other than Ixodes ricinus complex ticks.

PMID: 17199258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Kosik-Bogacka D, Bukowska K, Kuzna-Grygiel W.
Department of Biology and Medical Parasitology, Pomeranian Medical University, 70-111 Szczecin, al. Powstancow Wielkopolskich 72, Poland. [email protected]

The mosquitoes were caught within the period of their highest activity, i.e. June August 2001, in recreational areas of the city of Szczecin. Spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were detected in mosquitoes with the aid of the method of indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) using rabbit anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies and goat anti-rabbit IgG marked with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). A total of 639 mosquito females representing genera Aedes (99.1%) and Culex (0.9%) were collected. The mean value of the infection rate of mosquitoes from the area studied was 1.25%. The highest infection rate was recorded in June (3.2%), while the lowest -- in July (0.6%). All mosquitoes infected with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes belonged to the genus Aedes. The results of the present study confirm a potential role of those arthropods in epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis

PMID: 12088398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Halouzka J, Wilske B, Stunzner D, Sanogo YO, Hubalek Z.
Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno.

During the years 1995-1996, a total of 1,743 overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus female mosquitoes were tested for the presence of spirochetes in several localities in South Moravia, Czech Republic.The spirochetes were observed in 5% of the mosquitoes investigated. One of the five isolated strains of spirochetes (BR-84) was identified as Borrelia afzelii. The potential role of mosquitoes in the ecology and epidemiology of Lyme disease (LD) borreliae should be further investigated.

PMID: 10885843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Zakovska A, Capkova L, Sery O, Halouzka J, Dendis M.
Isolation of Borrelia afzelii from overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus
mosquitoes.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(2):345-8.
PMID: 17199258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Kosik-Bogacka DI, Kuzna-Grygiel W, Gornik K.
Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection in mosquitoes from Szczecin area.
Folia Biol (Krakow). 2006;54(1-2):55-9.
PMID: 17044261 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Nefeev AA.
[Investigation on mixed natural foci of zoonotic infections]
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2005 Mar-Apr;(2):117-8. Russian. No abstract
available.
PMID: 15881957 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Cechova L, Durnova E, Sikutova S, Halouzka J, Nemec M.
Characterization of spirochetal isolates from arthropods collected in South
Moravia, Czech Republic, using fatty acid methyl esters analysis.
J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2004 Sep 5;808(2):249-54.
PMID: 15261818 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Kosik-Bogacka D, Kuzna-Grygiel W, Bukowska K.
The prevalence of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in ticks Ixodes
ricinus and mosquitoes Aedes spp. within a selected recreational area in the
city of Szczecin.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2004;11(1):105-8.
PMID: 15236506 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Zakovska A, Nejedla P, Holikova A, Dendis M.
Positive findings of Borrelia burgdorferi in Culex (Culex) pipiens pipiens
larvae in the surrounding of Brno city determined by the PCR method.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(2):257-9.
PMID: 12498597 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Kosik-Bogacka D, Bukowska K, Kuzna-Grygiel W.
Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in mosquitoes (Culicidae) in
recreational areas of the city of Szczecin.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):55-7.
PMID: 12088398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Parola P, Raoult D.
Ticks and tickborne bacterial diseases in humans: an emerging infectious
threat.
Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Mar 15;32(6):897-928. Epub 2001 Mar 14. Review. Erratum
in: Clin Infect Dis 2001 Sep 1;33(5):749.
PMID: 11247714 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Halouzka J, Wilske B, Stunzner D, Sanogo YO, Hubalek Z.
Isolation of Borrelia afzelii from overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus
mosquitoes.
Infection. 1999;27(4-5):275-7.
PMID: 10885843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10: Hubalek Z, Halouzka J, Juricova Z.
Investigation of haematophagous arthropods for borreliae--summarized data,
1988-1996.
Folia Parasitol (Praha). 1998;45(1):67-72.
PMID: 9516997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Halouzka J, Postic D, Hubalek Z.
Isolation of the spirochaete Borrelia afzelii from the mosquito Aedes vexans in
the Czech Republic.
Med Vet Entomol. 1998 Jan;12(1):103-5.
PMID: 9513946 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12: Hubalek Z, Halouzka J.
Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genomic groups in Europe, a
review.
Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;13(8):951-7.
PMID: 9476827 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13: Adebajo AO, Axford JS, Rees DH.
Lyme disease in sub-Saharan Africa.
J Rheumatol. 1994 Mar;21(3):580. No abstract available.
PMID: 7911837 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14: Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF.
Ticks and biting insects infected with the etiologic agent of Lyme disease,
Borrelia burgdorferi.
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Aug;26(8):1482-6.
PMID: 3170711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15: Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF, Barbour AG.
The etiologic agent of Lyme disease in deer flies, horse flies, and mosquitoes.
J Infect Dis. 1986 Aug;154(2):355-8. No abstract available.
PMID: 2873190 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Morshed MG, Lee MK, Jorgensen D, Isaac-Renton JL.
Molecular methods used in clinical laboratory: prospects and pitfalls.
FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2007 Mar;49(2):184-91.
PMID: 17328752 [PubMed - in process]

2: Lange R, Seyyedi S.
Evidence of a Lyme borreliosis infection from the viewpoint of laboratory
medicine.
Int J Med Microbiol. 2002 Jun;291 Suppl 33:120-4.
PMID: 12141736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Woodrum JE, Oliver JH Jr.
Investigation of venereal, transplacental, and contact transmission of the Lyme
disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Syrian hamsters.
J Parasitol. 1999 Jun;85(3):426-30.
PMID: 10386432 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Cox DL, Akins DR, Bourell KW, Lahdenne P, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.
Limited surface exposure of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface lipoproteins.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996 Jul 23;93(15):7973-8.
PMID: 8755587 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Kumi-Diaka J, Harris O.
Viability of Borrelia burgdorferi in stored semen.
Br Vet J. 1995 Mar-Apr;151(2):221-4. No abstract available.
PMID: 8920118 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: De Boer R, Hovius KE, Nohlmans MK, Gray JS.
The woodmouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) as a reservoir of tick-transmitted
spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) in The Netherlands.
Zentralbl Bakteriol. 1993 Aug;279(3):404-16.
PMID: 8219511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Peters DH, Friedel HA, McTavish D.
Azithromycin. A review of its antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic
properties and clinical efficacy.
Drugs. 1992 Nov;44(5):750-99. Review.
PMID: 1280567 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Burstain JM, Grimprel E, Lukehart SA, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.
Sensitive detection of Treponema pallidum by using the polymerase chain
reaction.
J Clin Microbiol. 1991 Jan;29(1):62-9.
PMID: 1993770 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Schmid GP.
Epidemiology and clinical similarities of human spirochetal diseases.
Rev Infect Dis. 1989 Sep-Oct;11 Suppl 6:S1460-9. Review.
PMID: 2682958 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Netusil J, Zakovska A, Horvath R, Dendis M, Janouskovcova E.
Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in mites parasitizing small
rodents.
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2005 Fall;5(3):227-32.
PMID: 16187890 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Fernandez-Soto P, Perez-Sanchez R, Encinas-Grandes A.
Molecular detection of Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup organisms in larvae
of Neotrombicula autumnalis (Acari: Trombiculidae) captured in Spain.
J Parasitol. 2001 Dec;87(6):1482-3.
PMID: 11780844 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Chai G, Zhang X.
[Ultrastructural characteristics of Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia
burgdorferi) isolated from Ixodes persulcatus in China]
Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 1993 Jun;33(3):214-8. Chinese.
PMID: 8236953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Mather TN, Duffy DC, Campbell SR.
An unexpected result from burning vegetation to reduce Lyme disease
transmission risks.
J Med Entomol. 1993 May;30(3):642-5.
PMID: 8510127 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Zhang Z.
[Geographic distribution of Lyme disease in Mudanjiang]
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1991 Jun;12(3):154-7. Chinese.
PMID: 1863948 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Durden LA, Wilson N.
Parasitic and phoretic arthropods of sylvatic and commensal white-footed mice
(Peromyscus leucopus) in central Tennessee, with notes on Lyme disease.
J Parasitol. 1991 Apr;77(2):219-23.
PMID: 2010854 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Pan LN.
[The discover of Lyme disease in Fujian Province]
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1991 Feb;12(1):1-4. Chinese.
PMID: 1878953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Pokorny P.
[Incidence of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in arthropods (Arthropoda)
and antibodies in vertebrates (Vertebrata)]
Cesk Epidemiol Mikrobiol Imunol. 1989 Jan;38(1):52-60. Review. Czech.
PMID: 2646031 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Krampitz HE.
In vivo isolation and maintenance of some wild strains of European hard tick
spirochetes in mammalian and arthropod hosts. A parasitologist's view.
Zentralbl Bakteriol Mikrobiol Hyg [A]. 1986 Dec;263(1-2):21-8.
PMID: 3554840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Sabbatani S, Manfredi R, Chiodo F.
Neurosyphilis in a young adult: very early tertiary syphilis?
Int J STD AIDS. 2005 Dec;16(12):832-4.
PMID: 16336771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV, Rijpkema SG, Schouls LM.
Sexual transmission of Borrelia garinii by male Ixodes persulcatus ticks
(Acari, Ixodidae).
Exp Appl Acarol. 1999 Feb;23(2):165-9.
PMID: 10356767 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Powell JJ, Wojnarowska F.
Lichen sclerosus.
Lancet. 1999 May 22;353(9166):1777-83. Review.
PMID: 10348006 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Exchange of Borrelia burgdorferi between Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae:Acarina)
sexual partners.
J Med Entomol. 1996 May;33(3):351-4.
PMID: 8667380 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Venereal and cannibalistic ways of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato exchange
between males and females of Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae, Acarina).
Rocz Akad Med Bialymst. 1996;41(1):103-10.
PMID: 8673793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
treepatrol
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 4117

Icon 1 posted      Profile for treepatrol     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by treepatrol:
Borrelia in mosquitos

Zakovska A, Capkova L, Sery O, Halouzka J, Dendis M.
Department of Comparative Animal Physiology and General Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno, Czech Republic. [email protected]

A total of 662 samples (winter period: 469; summer period: 193 specimens) of female mosquitoes of the genus Culex, Aedes and Anopheles were collected during the period March 2000-April 2001 from the locality of Vysoke Myto (Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic). They were examined by dark field microscopy for the presence of spirochetes. The motile spirochetes were observed in 4.2 % of all species of investigated mosquitoes. One spirochetal strain out of the 8 isolation attempts (BRZ14) was obtained (cultivation rate was 12.5 %) and the spirochetal strain was then successfully cultivated and identified using PCR for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., and subsequently with the RFLP as genomospecies Borrelia afzelii. This strain was derived from overwintering Culex (Culex) pipiens biotype molestus female mosquitoe. This is apparently one of the sporadic cases of the occurrence of pathogenic borreliae in haematophagous arthropods, other than Ixodes ricinus complex ticks.

PMID: 17199258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Kosik-Bogacka D, Bukowska K, Kuzna-Grygiel W.
Department of Biology and Medical Parasitology, Pomeranian Medical University, 70-111 Szczecin, al. Powstancow Wielkopolskich 72, Poland. [email protected]

The mosquitoes were caught within the period of their highest activity, i.e. June August 2001, in recreational areas of the city of Szczecin. Spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were detected in mosquitoes with the aid of the method of indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) using rabbit anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies and goat anti-rabbit IgG marked with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). A total of 639 mosquito females representing genera Aedes (99.1%) and Culex (0.9%) were collected. The mean value of the infection rate of mosquitoes from the area studied was 1.25%. The highest infection rate was recorded in June (3.2%), while the lowest -- in July (0.6%). All mosquitoes infected with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes belonged to the genus Aedes. The results of the present study confirm a potential role of those arthropods in epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis

PMID: 12088398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Halouzka J, Wilske B, Stunzner D, Sanogo YO, Hubalek Z.
Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno.

During the years 1995-1996, a total of 1,743 overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus female mosquitoes were tested for the presence of spirochetes in several localities in South Moravia, Czech Republic.The spirochetes were observed in 5% of the mosquitoes investigated. One of the five isolated strains of spirochetes (BR-84) was identified as Borrelia afzelii. The potential role of mosquitoes in the ecology and epidemiology of Lyme disease (LD) borreliae should be further investigated.

PMID: 10885843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Zakovska A, Capkova L, Sery O, Halouzka J, Dendis M.
Isolation of Borrelia afzelii from overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus
mosquitoes.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(2):345-8.
PMID: 17199258 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Kosik-Bogacka DI, Kuzna-Grygiel W, Gornik K.
Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection in mosquitoes from Szczecin area.
Folia Biol (Krakow). 2006;54(1-2):55-9.
PMID: 17044261 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Nefeev AA.
[Investigation on mixed natural foci of zoonotic infections]
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2005 Mar-Apr;(2):117-8. Russian. No abstract
available.
PMID: 15881957 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Cechova L, Durnova E, Sikutova S, Halouzka J, Nemec M.
Characterization of spirochetal isolates from arthropods collected in South
Moravia, Czech Republic, using fatty acid methyl esters analysis.
J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2004 Sep 5;808(2):249-54.
PMID: 15261818 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Kosik-Bogacka D, Kuzna-Grygiel W, Bukowska K.
The prevalence of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in ticks Ixodes
ricinus and mosquitoes Aedes spp. within a selected recreational area in the
city of Szczecin.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2004;11(1):105-8.
PMID: 15236506 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Zakovska A, Nejedla P, Holikova A, Dendis M.
Positive findings of Borrelia burgdorferi in Culex (Culex) pipiens pipiens
larvae in the surrounding of Brno city determined by the PCR method.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(2):257-9.
PMID: 12498597 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Kosik-Bogacka D, Bukowska K, Kuzna-Grygiel W.
Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in mosquitoes (Culicidae) in
recreational areas of the city of Szczecin.
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):55-7.
PMID: 12088398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Parola P, Raoult D.
Ticks and tickborne bacterial diseases in humans: an emerging infectious
threat.
Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Mar 15;32(6):897-928. Epub 2001 Mar 14. Review. Erratum
in: Clin Infect Dis 2001 Sep 1;33(5):749.
PMID: 11247714 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Halouzka J, Wilske B, Stunzner D, Sanogo YO, Hubalek Z.
Isolation of Borrelia afzelii from overwintering Culex pipiens biotype molestus
mosquitoes.
Infection. 1999;27(4-5):275-7.
PMID: 10885843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10: Hubalek Z, Halouzka J, Juricova Z.
Investigation of haematophagous arthropods for borreliae--summarized data,
1988-1996.
Folia Parasitol (Praha). 1998;45(1):67-72.
PMID: 9516997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Halouzka J, Postic D, Hubalek Z.
Isolation of the spirochaete Borrelia afzelii from the mosquito Aedes vexans in
the Czech Republic.
Med Vet Entomol. 1998 Jan;12(1):103-5.
PMID: 9513946 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12: Hubalek Z, Halouzka J.
Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genomic groups in Europe, a
review.
Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;13(8):951-7.
PMID: 9476827 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13: Adebajo AO, Axford JS, Rees DH.
Lyme disease in sub-Saharan Africa.
J Rheumatol. 1994 Mar;21(3):580. No abstract available.
PMID: 7911837 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14: Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF.
Ticks and biting insects infected with the etiologic agent of Lyme disease,
Borrelia burgdorferi.
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Aug;26(8):1482-6.
PMID: 3170711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15: Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF, Barbour AG.
The etiologic agent of Lyme disease in deer flies, horse flies, and mosquitoes.
J Infect Dis. 1986 Aug;154(2):355-8. No abstract available.
PMID: 2873190 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Morshed MG, Lee MK, Jorgensen D, Isaac-Renton JL.
Molecular methods used in clinical laboratory: prospects and pitfalls.
FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2007 Mar;49(2):184-91.
PMID: 17328752 [PubMed - in process]

2: Lange R, Seyyedi S.
Evidence of a Lyme borreliosis infection from the viewpoint of laboratory
medicine.
Int J Med Microbiol. 2002 Jun;291 Suppl 33:120-4.
PMID: 12141736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Woodrum JE, Oliver JH Jr.
Investigation of venereal, transplacental, and contact transmission of the Lyme
disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Syrian hamsters.
J Parasitol. 1999 Jun;85(3):426-30.
PMID: 10386432 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Cox DL, Akins DR, Bourell KW, Lahdenne P, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.
Limited surface exposure of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface lipoproteins.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996 Jul 23;93(15):7973-8.
PMID: 8755587 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Kumi-Diaka J, Harris O.
Viability of Borrelia burgdorferi in stored semen.
Br Vet J. 1995 Mar-Apr;151(2):221-4. No abstract available.
PMID: 8920118 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: De Boer R, Hovius KE, Nohlmans MK, Gray JS.
The woodmouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) as a reservoir of tick-transmitted
spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) in The Netherlands.
Zentralbl Bakteriol. 1993 Aug;279(3):404-16.
PMID: 8219511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Peters DH, Friedel HA, McTavish D.
Azithromycin. A review of its antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic
properties and clinical efficacy.
Drugs. 1992 Nov;44(5):750-99. Review.
PMID: 1280567 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Burstain JM, Grimprel E, Lukehart SA, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.
Sensitive detection of Treponema pallidum by using the polymerase chain
reaction.
J Clin Microbiol. 1991 Jan;29(1):62-9.
PMID: 1993770 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Schmid GP.
Epidemiology and clinical similarities of human spirochetal diseases.
Rev Infect Dis. 1989 Sep-Oct;11 Suppl 6:S1460-9. Review.
PMID: 2682958 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Netusil J, Zakovska A, Horvath R, Dendis M, Janouskovcova E.
Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in mites parasitizing small
rodents.
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2005 Fall;5(3):227-32.
PMID: 16187890 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Fernandez-Soto P, Perez-Sanchez R, Encinas-Grandes A.
Molecular detection of Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup organisms in larvae
of Neotrombicula autumnalis (Acari: Trombiculidae) captured in Spain.
J Parasitol. 2001 Dec;87(6):1482-3.
PMID: 11780844 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Chai G, Zhang X.
[Ultrastructural characteristics of Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia
burgdorferi) isolated from Ixodes persulcatus in China]
Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 1993 Jun;33(3):214-8. Chinese.
PMID: 8236953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Mather TN, Duffy DC, Campbell SR.
An unexpected result from burning vegetation to reduce Lyme disease
transmission risks.
J Med Entomol. 1993 May;30(3):642-5.
PMID: 8510127 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Zhang Z.
[Geographic distribution of Lyme disease in Mudanjiang]
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1991 Jun;12(3):154-7. Chinese.
PMID: 1863948 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Durden LA, Wilson N.
Parasitic and phoretic arthropods of sylvatic and commensal white-footed mice
(Peromyscus leucopus) in central Tennessee, with notes on Lyme disease.
J Parasitol. 1991 Apr;77(2):219-23.
PMID: 2010854 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Pan LN.
[The discover of Lyme disease in Fujian Province]
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 1991 Feb;12(1):1-4. Chinese.
PMID: 1878953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Pokorny P.
[Incidence of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in arthropods (Arthropoda)
and antibodies in vertebrates (Vertebrata)]
Cesk Epidemiol Mikrobiol Imunol. 1989 Jan;38(1):52-60. Review. Czech.
PMID: 2646031 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Krampitz HE.
In vivo isolation and maintenance of some wild strains of European hard tick
spirochetes in mammalian and arthropod hosts. A parasitologist's view.
Zentralbl Bakteriol Mikrobiol Hyg [A]. 1986 Dec;263(1-2):21-8.
PMID: 3554840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1: Sabbatani S, Manfredi R, Chiodo F.
Neurosyphilis in a young adult: very early tertiary syphilis?
Int J STD AIDS. 2005 Dec;16(12):832-4.
PMID: 16336771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV, Rijpkema SG, Schouls LM.
Sexual transmission of Borrelia garinii by male Ixodes persulcatus ticks
(Acari, Ixodidae).
Exp Appl Acarol. 1999 Feb;23(2):165-9.
PMID: 10356767 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Powell JJ, Wojnarowska F.
Lichen sclerosus.
Lancet. 1999 May 22;353(9166):1777-83. Review.
PMID: 10348006 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Exchange of Borrelia burgdorferi between Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae:Acarina)
sexual partners.
J Med Entomol. 1996 May;33(3):351-4.
PMID: 8667380 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Venereal and cannibalistic ways of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato exchange
between males and females of Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae, Acarina).
Rocz Akad Med Bialymst. 1996;41(1):103-10.
PMID: 8673793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

venereal


1: Woodrum JE, Oliver JH Jr.
Investigation of venereal, transplacental, and contact transmission of the Lyme
disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in Syrian hamsters.
J Parasitol. 1999 Jun;85(3):426-30.
PMID: 10386432 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Exchange of Borrelia burgdorferi between Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae:Acarina)
sexual partners.
J Med Entomol. 1996 May;33(3):351-4.
PMID: 8667380 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Alekseev AN, Dubinina HV.
Venereal and cannibalistic ways of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato exchange
between males and females of Ixodes persulcatus (Ixodidae, Acarina).
Rocz Akad Med Bialymst. 1996;41(1):103-10.
PMID: 8673793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4: Hammouda NA, Hegazy IH, el-Sawy EH.
ELISA screening for Lyme disease in children with chronic arthritis.
J Egypt Soc Parasitol. 1995 Aug;25(2):525-33.
PMID: 7665949 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Jones JD, Bourell KW, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.
Membrane topology of Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum lipoproteins.
Infect Immun. 1995 Jul;63(7):2424-34.
PMID: 7790053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Huang HC, Lee CL, Pan TM.
A preliminary report on Borrelia burgdorferi infection in the Taiwan area.
Zhonghua Min Guo Wei Sheng Wu Ji Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi. 1994 Nov;27(4):211-4.
PMID: 9747351 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Belisle JT, Brandt ME, Radolf JD, Norgard MV.
Fatty acids of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.
J Bacteriol. 1994 Apr;176(8):2151-7.
PMID: 8157583 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Lewis B.
Treponematosis and Lyme borreliosis connections: explanation for Tchefuncte
disease syndromes?
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1994 Apr;93(4):455-75.
PMID: 8048468 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Morgan OS, Smikle MF, Barton EN, Blattner WA.
Spirochetal antibodies in tropical spastic paraparesis: their significance.
J Assoc Acad Minor Phys. 1993;4(2):59-61.
PMID: 8490288 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10: Moody KD, Barthold SW.
Relative infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi in Lewis rats by various routes of
inoculation.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1991 Feb;44(2):135-9.
PMID: 2012256 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Gaber MS, Khalil GM, Hoogstraal H.
Borrelia crocidurae: venereal transfer in Egyptian Ornithodoros erraticus
ticks.
Exp Parasitol. 1982 Oct;54(2):182-4. No abstract available.
PMID: 6889976 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CaliforniaLyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 7136

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CaliforniaLyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I do NOT believe it is sexually transmitted!!

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

Posts: 5639 | From Aptos CA USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Takedownthemoon
Member
Member # 9008

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Takedownthemoon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For those who do not believe it is sexually transmitted-you are aware it is a spirochete? A spirochete that has been cultured from saliva for goodness sakes!!

A very knowledgable LLMD told me that people are now getting Lyme from cow's milk...

Posts: 89 | From Ohio | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree with Tincup (and always get a good laugh from the posts!), that since we don't know, care is needed.

However, I think for those of us who have been with the same spouse for years, if it were going to be transmitted sexually, it would have been already. The woman who posted has been with her guy since before she was diagnosed.

I was asymptomatic for 10 years. Then it went into remission on its own 3 times. So there's truth to that, too.

Mine was always set off be severe emotional stress. If it weren't for the stress I had I don't think I ever would have shown symptoms. I think some people can carry the disease but their immune system keeps it in check. Perhaps that's what my husband and children are doing, who knows?

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Truthfinder
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 8512

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Truthfinder     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Searching4, the truth of the matter is we really don't know who HAS IT and who DOESN'T.

After all, the only asymptomatic people who get tested are spouses and family of Lymies. And very often, they test positive with no symptoms.

There are studies from Europe that show only a small percentage of people "infected" with Lyme bacteria actually become symptomatic (at least right away).

As I recall, the longest documented, verified time lapse between tick-bite infection and onset of symptoms is 5 years, but I'll wager that there may be people out there who never get "sick" even though they are infected.

It's almost as if there have to be precipitating factors that cause the Lyme bacteria to become pathogenic or destructive.

Could it be that the bugs stay rather dormant or innocuous in most of the population? It's certainly possible, isn't it?

Tracy

--------------------
Tracy
.... Prayers for the Lyme Community - every day at 6 p.m. Pacific Time and 9 p.m. Eastern Time just take a few moments to say a prayer wherever you are.

Posts: 2966 | From Colorado | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CaliforniaLyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 7136

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CaliforniaLyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Takedownthemoon,

Yes, I am aware it is a spirochete!!! SO IS LEPTOSPIRA- and BRACHYSPIRA- and MANY OTHERS!
They all have differing routes of TRANSMISSION!

Who is high risk for Leptospirosis?

A. Sewage workers
B. Dairy workers
C. Sea lions
D. Flood victims in areas with sewage
E. ALL OF THE ABOVE BECAUSE IT IS HIGHLY TRANSMISSIBLE IN LIQUID-

Who is at HIGH risk for syphilis????

A. prostitutes who do not use safe sex
B. anyone promiscuous who does not use safe sex
C. babies of the above if they are female
D. ALL OF THE ABOVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Who is high risk for Lyme disease?

A. agricultural workers
B. the homeless!!!
C. outdoor activity people, ex. hikers
D. anyone who goes outdoors
E. ALL OF THE ABOVE!!!!!!!!!!!!

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

Posts: 5639 | From Aptos CA USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
brentb
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6899

Icon 1 posted      Profile for brentb     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tincup:


I also know the health department's stand on this is..
If it hasn't been documented, it can't be so.
As far as I know they have NEVER EVER EVER looked. So much for brains!

Agreed!
Does anyone really believe they forgot to check if borrelia is a STD? They either know the answer so therefore have done no studies OR their incompetence is beyond comprehension.
Sometimes absence of proof is proof in and of itself. This is such a time.

Posts: 731 | From Humble,TX | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.