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Tincup
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Check the list and match it with your symptoms if neuro Lyme is your problem. It will indicate which nerve has been affected.


Cranial nerves: Nerves that emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to
the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. Cranial nerves come directly from the brain through the skull. There are 12 cranial nerves each of which is accorded a Roman numeral and a name:
Cranial nerve I: The olfactory nerve, Cranial nerve II: the optic nerve,
Cranial nerve III: the occulomotor nerve, Cranial nerve IV: the trochlear nerve, Cranial nerve V: the trigeminal nerve, Cranial nerve VI: the abducent nerve, Cranial nerve VII: the facial nerve,
Cranial nerve VIII: the vestibulocochlear nerve,
Cranial nerve IX: the glossopharyngeal nerve,
Cranial nerve X:the vagus nerve,
Cranial nerve XI: the accessory
nerve, and
Cranial nerve XII: the hypoglossal nerve.
The cranial nerves are nerves of the brain.


Cranial nerve I: The cranial nerves emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as
opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. There are twelve
cranial nerves.
The first cranial nerve is the olfactory nerve which carries impulses for the sense of smell from the nose to the brain.
The word "olfactory" comes from the Latin "olfactare", to sniff at and "olfacere", to smell.

Cranial nerve II: The second cranial is the optic nerve, the nerve that connects the eye
to the brain and carries the impulses formed by the retina -- the nerve layer that lines the back of the eye, senses light and creates the impulses -- to the brain which interprets them as images.
In terms of its embryonic development, the optic nerve is a part of the central nervous
system (CNS) rather than a peripheral nerve.
The word "optic" comes from the Greek "optikos", pertaining to sight.
Aside from the optic nerve, the eye has a number of other components. These include the
cornea, iris, pupil, lens, retina, macula, and vitreous.

Cranial nerve III: The third cranial nerve is the oculomotor nerve.
The oculomotor nerve is responsible for the nerve supply to muscles about the eye:
The upper eyelid muscle which raises the eyelid; The extraocular muscle which moves the eye inward; and The pupillary muscle which constricts the pupil.
Paralysis of the oculomotor nerve results in drooping eyelid (ptosis), deviation of the
eyeball outward (and therefore double vision) and a dilated (wide-open) pupil.

Cranial nerve IV: The fourth cranial nerve, the trochlear nerve, is the nerve supply to
the superior oblique muscle of the eye, one of the muscles that moves the eye. Paralysis
of the trochlear nerve results in rotation of the eyeball upward and outward (and,
therefore, double vision).
The trochlear nerve is the only cranial nerve that arises from the back of the brain stem and it follows the longest course within the skull of any of the cranial nerves.

Cranial nerve V: The fifth cranial nerve is the trigeminal nerve.
The trigeminal nerve is quite complex. It functions both as the chief nerve of sensation for the face and the motor nerve controlling the muscles of mastication (chewing). Problems with the sensory part of the trigeminal nerve result in pain or loss of sensation in the face. Problems with the motor root of the trigeminal nerve result in deviation of the jaw toward the affected side and trouble chewing.
The term "trigeminal" comes from the Latin "trigeminus" meaning "threefold," referring to the three divisions (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular) of this nerve.

Cranial nerve VI: The sixth cranial nerve is the abducent nerve. It is a small motor
nerve that has one task: to supply a muscle called the lateral rectus muscle that moves the eye outward. Paralysis of the abducent nerve causes inward turning of the eye (internal strabismus) leading to double vision.
The word "abducent" comes from the Latin "ab-", away from + "ducere", to draw = to
draw away. The abducent (or abducens) operates the lateral rectus muscle that draws the eye toward the side of the head. The abducent nerve is also called the abducens nerve.

Cranial nerve VII: The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve.
The facial nerve supplies the muscles of facial expression. Paralysis of the facial nerve causes a characteristic picture with drooping of one side of the face, inability to wrinkle the forehead, inability to whistle, inability to close the eye
and deviation of the mouth toward the other side of the face. Paralysis of the facial nerve is called Bell's palsy.

Cranial nerve VIII: The eighth cranial nerve is the vestibulocochlear nerve.
The vestibulocochlear nerve is responsible for the sense of hearing and it is also pertinent to balance, to the body position sense. Problems with the vestibulocochlear nerve may result in , (ringing or noise in the ears), vertigo and vomiting.


Cranial nerve IX: The ninth cranial nerve is the glossopharyngeal nerve. The 12 cranial
nerves, the glossopharyngeal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the
cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.
The glossopharyngeal nerve supplies the tongue, throat, and one of the salivary glands (the parotid gland). Problems with the glossopharyngeal nerve result in trouble with taste and swallowing.
"Glosso-" comes from the Greek "glossa", the tongue and "pharynx" is the Greek for
throat. So the glossopharyngeal nerve is the nerve that serves the tongue and throat.

Cranial nerve X: The tenth cranial nerve, and one of the most important, is the vagus
nerve. All twelve of the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve included, emerge from or enter
the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral
column. The vagus nerve originates in the medulla oblongata, a part of the brain stem.
The vagus nerve is a remarkable nerve that relates to the function of numerous structures in the body. The vagus nerve supplies nerve fibers to the pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), trachea (windpipe), lungs, heart, esophagus and most of the intestinal tract (as far
as the transverse portion of the colon). And the vagus nerve brings sensory information
back from the ear, tongue, pharynx and larynx. The term "vagus" (Latin for "wandering") is apt because the vagus nerve wanders all the
way down from the brainstem to the colon, a long wandering trek. Complete interruption of the vagus nerve causes a characteristic syndrome. The back part of the palate (the soft palate) droops on that side. The capacity to gag (the gag reflex) is
also lost on that side. The voice is hoarse and nasal. The vocal cord on the affected side is immobile. The result is dysphagia and dysphonia (trouble swallowing and trouble
speaking).
One of the best known branches of the vagus nerve is the recurrent laryngeal nerve. After
leaving the vagus nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve goes down into the chest and then loops back up to supply the larynx (the voice box). Damage to the recurrent laryngeal
nerve can result from diseases inside the chest (intrathoracic diseases) such as a tumor or an aneurysm (ballooning) of the arch of the aorta or of the left atrium of the heart. The consequence is laryngeal palsy, paralysis of the larynx (the voice box), on the affected side. Laryngeal palsy can also be caused by damage to the vagus nerve before it gives off the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

Cranial nerve XI: The eleventh cranial nerve is the accessory nerve. The accessory is
so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord.
The accessory nerve supplies the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is in the front of the neck and turns the head. The trapezius muscle moves the scapula (the wingbone), turns the face to the opposite side, and helps pull the head back.
Damage to the accessory nerve can be isolated (confined to the accesssory nerve) or it may also involve the ninth and tenth cranial nerves which exit through the same opening (foramen) from the skull . Accessory neuropathy (nerve disease) can sometimes occur and recur for unknown reasons. Most patients recover. Paralysis of the accessory nerve prevents rotation of the head away from that side and
causes drooping of the shoulder.

Cranial nerve XII: The twelfth cranial nerve is the hypoglossal nerve.
The hypoglossal nerve supplies the muscles of the tongue. (The Greek "hypo-", under and
"-glossal" from "glossa", the tongue = under the tongue).
Paralysis of the hypoglossal nerve affects the tongue. It impairs speech (it sounds thick) and causes the tongue to deviate toward the paralyzed side. In time, the tongue diminishes in size (atrophies).


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Tincup
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Bringing it up for nancys...
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KJerseyGirl
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Tincup,

You are truly amazing. Can we commission the pope to cannonize you?

You've given me more paper work. I'll get around to reading it someday.

Thanks again!


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WildCondor
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Great stuff.

I have the 5th cranial nerve inflammation, and bad, clicky, clanky, painful TMJ in my jaw and head from this damn mess, does it ever go away???


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bg2711
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Tincup, you truly are amazing and I have learned so much from you. After reading this, I know why I have been having so much trouble with my tongue, throat and breathing episodes with the Lyme.

Thanks so much for sharing and researching for us all, you have helped us all so much and your efforts are appreciated greatly!! Thank you Barb


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Tincup
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Bringing this up for "lickless"...

I get the ice cream cone today!

------------------
Please don't feed the ducks!


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Kira
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Hello,

Just a question...how does it help to know what symptom goes to what nerve...is there special treatment one can focus on for each nerve???

I know the lyme is in my brain big time...neuro symptoms are across the board...so just wondering how to use this info???

Kira


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Tincup
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Hi Kira..

For me it was just good to know that the symptoms I was having were caused by something other than the ducks saying I was nuts for no reason.

It also helped me to know that when I woke up with a weird symptom.. there was a reason.

I guess I researched it to see that I wasn't being invaded by aliens.. like I was being made to believe by neuro ducks that had no clue.

For me.. I needed to know I wasn't totally insane.

You notice I said "totally"...

------------------
Please don't feed the ducks!


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Tincup
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For momto49,000..

Hope this helps. I wish MIL the very best.

BTW- If you need any more info I can search out.. or others can.. please let us know. We would be pleased to be able to help...


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levity101
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Thanks again, Tincup.
Interesting to see how it all works.
Max's headaches get worse from the odor of certain things that he eats. "Smells" like nerve involvement to me!
Also, has the jaw thing happening.
And lately, even though he's not reporting double or blurry vision, I think his right eye is straying slightly to the middle...not sure about that one.

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Tincup
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Up for Kathy K...


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Tincup
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up for Sandy....
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sandygf
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Tincup

Oh how my drooping eyelid thanks you
for this one........and all the
other good info too!

I sure hope Mel Gibson appreciates
you..


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Poochini
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Oh what fun, let's see, I have...

Cranial Nerve I: Odors smell stronger. Hand lotion and perfume are sickly sweet. So are flowers. It now bothers me to smell sweet flowers and candles at the dinner table. They overpower the food.

Cranial Nerve II: I see lots of images that are not really there. Sometimes color gets weaker, washed out.

Cranial Nerve V: I have shooting pains in my face.

Cranial Nerve VII: I have droopiness on one side of my face, especially when tired. My mouth deviates to one side. I can't raise my eyebrow on the other side. It's as if my face is divided into quadrants and the quarters that are northwest and southeast are weak.

Cranial Nerve VIII: I hear ringing in my ears. I have nausea often. I also get sharp, stabbing pains in my ears every day.

Cranial Nerve X: Sometimes I find it really hard to swallow voluntarily. I choke easily on saliva. I also get periods of a weak, hoarse voice.


Guess I have neuro Lyme. But I knew that. The brain MRI told me so.

Poochini


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Tincup
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up for new member...


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Tincup
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up for NHmom...
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joanie
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I'm new to all of this, and reading through these posts. I find this especially interesting and can identify which symptoms/which nerves are affected for me. I think I'm very similar to Poochini. I, too, have the question (I apologize for my naivete since this is fairly new to me) but which drug combos work best on killing off the Lyme affecting these nerves? I could benefit from experiences of those who have gone before me! I've been tried on suprax/biaxin and now rocephin but it made me so ill, I had to d/c it. I'm spending months recovering from the damage it did to my gut. What works? Especially for VIII, the vestibular one. Tinnitus! Thanks!
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Tincup
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Should I wear red socks or blue with my alligator boots?


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seibertneurolyme
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Up for I Have Lyme Etc.
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I Have Lyme Etc
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Thank you VERY much for this!!

------------------
"It is not genius, nor glory, nor love that reflects the greatness of the
human soul.....it is kindness..."


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seibertneurolyme
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Up for newbies and others with shivering chins.

Bea Seibert

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jwenny
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Great info Tincup!!!

Anybody wish to share any treatment protocols for the cranial nerves?

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bettyg
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Tincup, breaking this up for us neuro lymies to read/comprehend. Pleaste hit enter OFTEN and double space.

quote:
Originally posted by Tincup:

Check the list and match it with your symptoms if neuro Lyme is your problem. It will indicate which nerve has been affected.

Cranial nerves: Nerves that emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to
the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

Cranial nerves come directly from the brain through the skull. There are 12 cranial nerves each of which is accorded a Roman numeral and a name:

Cranial nerve I: The olfactory nerve,
Cranial nerve II: the optic nerve,
Cranial nerve III: the occulomotor nerve,
Cranial nerve IV: the trochlear nerve,
Cranial nerve V: the trigeminal nerve,
Cranial nerve VI: the abducent nerve,

Cranial nerve VII: the facial nerve,
Cranial nerve VIII: the vestibulocochlear nerve,
Cranial nerve IX: the glossopharyngeal nerve,
Cranial nerve X:the vagus nerve,
Cranial nerve XI: the accessory
nerve, and
Cranial nerve XII: the hypoglossal nerve.

The cranial nerves are nerves of the brain.


Cranial nerve I: The cranial nerves emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as
opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. There are twelve
cranial nerves.

The first cranial nerve is the olfactory nerve which carries impulses for the sense of smell from the nose to the brain.

The word "olfactory" comes from the
Latin "olfactare", to sniff at and "olfacere", to smell.

Cranial nerve II:

The second cranial is the optic nerve, the nerve that connects the eye to the brain and carries the impulses formed by the retina -- the nerve layer that lines the back of the eye, senses light and creates the impulses -- to the brain which interprets them as images.

In terms of its embryonic development, the optic nerve is a part of the central nervous
system (CNS) rather than a peripheral nerve.
The word "optic" comes from the Greek "optikos", pertaining to sight.

Aside from the optic nerve, the eye has a number of other components. These include the
cornea, iris, pupil, lens, retina, macula, and vitreous.

Cranial nerve III:

The third cranial nerve is the oculomotor nerve.

The oculomotor nerve is responsible for the nerve supply to muscles about the eye:

The upper eyelid muscle which raises the eyelid; The extraocular muscle which moves the eye inward; and The pupillary muscle which constricts the pupil.

Paralysis of the oculomotor nerve results in drooping eyelid (ptosis), deviation of the
eyeball outward (and therefore double vision) and a dilated (wide-open) pupil.

Cranial nerve IV:

The fourth cranial nerve, the trochlear nerve, is the nerve supply to the superior oblique muscle of the eye, one of the muscles that moves the eye.

Paralysis of the trochlear nerve results in rotation of the eyeball upward and outward (and,
therefore, double vision).

The trochlear nerve is the only cranial nerve that arises from the back of the brain stem and it follows the longest course within the skull of any of the cranial nerves.

Cranial nerve V: The fifth cranial nerve is the trigeminal nerve.

The trigeminal nerve is quite complex. It functions both as the chief nerve of sensation for the face and the motor nerve controlling the muscles of mastication (chewing).

Problems with the sensory part of the trigeminal nerve result in pain or loss of sensation in the face.

Problems with the motor root of the trigeminal nerve result in deviation of the jaw toward the affected side and trouble chewing.

The term "trigeminal" comes from the :Latin in "trigeminus" meaning "threefold," referring to the three divisions (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular) of this nerve.

Cranial nerve VI:

The sixth cranial nerve is the abducent nerve. It is a small motor nerve that has one task: to supply a muscle called the lateral rectus muscle that moves the eye outward.

Paralysis of the abducent nerve causes inward turning of the eye (internal strabismus) leading to double vision.

The word "abducent" comes from the Latin "ab-", away from + "ducere", to draw = to
draw away.

The abducent (or abducens) operates the lateral rectus muscle that draws the eye toward the side of the head. The abducent nerve is also called the abducens nerve.

Cranial nerve VII:

The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve.

The facial nerve supplies the muscles of facial expression. Paralysis of the facial nerve causes a characteristic picture with drooping of one side of the face, inability to wrinkle the forehead, inability to whistle, inability to close the eye and deviation of the mouth toward the other side of the face.

Cranial nerve VIII:

The eighth cranial nerve is the vestibulocochlear nerve.

The vestibulocochlear nerve is responsible for the sense of hearing and it is also pertinent to balance, to the body position sense. Problems with the vestibulocochlear nerve may result in, (ringing or noise in the ears), vertigo and vomiting.

Cranial nerve IX:

The ninth cranial nerve is the glossopharyngeal nerve.

The 12 cranial nerves, the glossopharyngeal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the
cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

The glossopharyngeal nerve supplies the tongue, throat, and one of the salivary glands (the parotid gland).

Problems with the glossopharyngeal nerve result in trouble with taste and swallowing.

"Glosso-" comes from the Greek "glossa", the tongue and "pharynx" is the Greek for
throat. So the glossopharyngeal nerve is the nerve that serves the tongue and throat.

Cranial nerve X:

The tenth cranial nerve, and one of the most important, is the vagus.

All twelve of the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

The vagus nerve originates in the medulla oblongata, a part of the brain stem.

The vagus nerve is a remarkable nerve that relates to the function of numerous structures in the body.

The vagus nerve supplies nerve fibers to the pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), trachea (windpipe), lungs, heart, esophagus and most of the intestinal tract (as far as the transverse portion of the colon).

And the vagus nerve brings sensory information
back from the ear, tongue, pharynx and larynx.

The term "vagus" (Latin for "wandering") is apt because the vagus nerve wanders all the
way down from the brainstem to the colon, a long wandering trek.

Complete interruption of the vagus nerve causes a characteristic syndrome.

The back part of the palate (the soft palate) droops on that side.

The capacity to gag (the gag reflex) is also lost on that side.

The voice is hoarse and nasal.

The vocal cord on the affected side is immobile.

The result is dysphagia and dysphonia (trouble swallowing and trouble speaking).

One of the best known branches of the vagus nerve is the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

After leaving the vagus nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve goes down into the chest and then loops back up to supply the larynx (the voice box).

Damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve can result from diseases inside the chest (intrathoracic diseases); such as, a tumor or an aneurysm (ballooning) of the arch of the aorta or of the left atrium of the heart.

The consequence is laryngeal palsy, paralysis of the larynx (the voice box), on the affected side. Laryngeal palsy can also be caused by damage to the vagus nerve before it gives off the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

Cranial nerve XI:

The eleventh cranial nerve is the accessory nerve.

The accessory is so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord.

The accessory nerve supplies the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

The sternocleidomastoid muscle is in the front of the neck and turns the head. The trapezius muscle moves the scapula (the wingbone), turns the face to the opposite side, and helps pull the head back.

Damage to the accessory nerve can be isolated (confined to the accesssory nerve) or it may also involve the ninth and tenth cranial nerves which exit through the same opening (foramen) from the skull.

Accessory neuropathy (nerve disease) can sometimes occur and recur for unknown reasons. Most patients recover.

Paralysis of the accessory nerve prevents rotation of the head away from that side and
causes drooping of the shoulder.

Cranial nerve XII: The twelfth cranial nerve is the hypoglossal nerve.

The hypoglossal nerve supplies the muscles of the tongue. (The Greek "hypo-", under and
"-glossal" from "glossa", the tongue = under the tongue).

Paralysis of the hypoglossal nerve affects the tongue. It impairs speech (it sounds thick) and causes the tongue to deviate toward the paralyzed side. In time, the tongue diminishes in size (atrophies).

Wow, talk about informative Tincup! Outstanding job as usual. Glad someone brought this up, and I'll ask Treepatrol to add to his newbie's links.
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Tincup
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Up for D.... the one with the raw steak on her forehead.

[Big Grin]

[lick]

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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Tincup
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Up for our friend KRAZY...

[Big Grin]

Anyone else have pigeons for supper?

[Big Grin]

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