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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Chitosan kills biofilm?

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Author Topic: Chitosan kills biofilm?
3carolyn
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Hi all,

Is anyone using this?
For what?
Is it working?

I put a pot up about biofilm and apparently we can't get the seaweed that was mentione din the article yet- unless we harvest it ourselves of course.

Anyway- I came across an article about chitosan as a biofilm inhibitor- not the same vehicle as the seaweed, but it makes the colonizing sites both unhospitable and lethal for the organism trying to colonize.

It has been discussed here before in ref to detox- and possible lead content.

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 10 - A chemical compound found in crabs and shrimp that has long been known to have certain medicinal value also can act like a "bed of nails," fending off microbes seeking to colonize wound dressings, catheters and other implantable medical devices, according to Montana State University researchers. Using the compound to coat these medical devices, they say, could help prevent thousands of bacterial and yeast infections annually.

The preliminary finding, by Philip Stewart, Ph.D., director of MSU's Center for Biofilm Engineering, and Ross Carlson, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemical engineering, was described today at the 232nd national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

In their laboratory studies, chitosan - a sugar in the cells of crabs and shrimp - repelled bacteria and yeast, effectively preventing these microbes from forming slimy, glue-like layers of infectious cells, known as biofilms, Stewart said. These biofilms account for up to 65 percent of the bacterial infections in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The researchers say that while chitosan is well known for its antimicrobial activity, this is the first time its anti-biofilm activity has been described.

"Coating chitosan onto a surface seems to stop bacteria and yeast from colonizing that surface," Stewart said. "Chitosan almost acts like a bed of nails. If a microbe alights on it, the chitosan skewers it or causes it to leak. That might not kill microbes outright, but it certainly discourages them from establishing a foothold."

Biofilms are considered the leading cause of up to 400,000 cases of catheter-related, bloodstream infections each year, Stewart said. In addition, biofilms can arise on virtually any device implanted in the body, including mechanical heart valves, contact lens, artificial hips and knees, and breast implants. Once a biofilm-induced infection takes hold, it can be difficult to treat and often requires the surgical removal of the affected device, he said.

If further testing in animals and humans proves successful, coating these devices with chitosan could become an important first line of defense, according to Stewart. "I don't want to claim we've fully solved the problem here," he said, "but ... I think over the next 10 years we're going to be seeing new technologies in the form of coatings that will prevent or at least reduce the incidence of infection."

Chitosan is derived from chitin, the main component of crustacean shells. It is sold commercially as a nutritional supplement and is an FDA-approved material for staunching blood loss. Chitosan also is used in biomaterials, as a thickener in cosmetics and a flocculating agent in water treatment. As a biomaterial, chitosan has a track record for its non-toxicity, biocompatibility, ability to promote healing and its inherent antimicrobial properties.

Posts: 16 | From philadelphia | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
brentb
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Hard to say if one has a biofilm infection or not. As the article mentions most pub is on medical devices in which the biofilm adheres to. Some ionic silver producing devices/catheters are being made which now prevent this.

If we have a biofilm chances are it's sitting up in the sinuses. Irrigation can easily cure with natural or traditionl abx. I myself have a biofilm infection and plan to try this with the rest of my regime.

Many thanx for the post.

Posts: 731 | From Humble,TX | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
micul
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It certainly sounds like it is effective for whatever surface it is allowed to come into contact with or coat, but I think that the problem of biofilms in relation to TBD's is systemic. So Chitosan would have to be able to get into the blood and tissues in order to be effective at getting to these colonies. But it still may help even if it is unable to do this. It also might interfere with the absorption of meds, so you have to be carefull there.

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You're only a failure when you stop trying.

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SForsgren
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Aside from this, chitosan can be a very good binder for herxes and neurotoxins. Definitely one of the options there.

--------------------
Be well,
Scott

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Carol in PA
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Google for info about "systemic enzyme therapy" and biofilm.

Systemic enzymes reduce the biofilm.

Carol

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3carolyn
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I am so greateful you are sharing your thoughts- Thank you.
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kelmo
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When I do a search on chitosan, it gives me weight loss websites. Is it an ingredient used for fat binding?

Would enzyme therapy, such as wobezyme, or rechtsruglat better for breaking down the biofilm?

From what I have heard, the Bartonella bacteria is the one that has the biofilm. Sorry, I don't have anything to substantiate that claim.

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treepatrol
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up

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

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Clarissa
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I'm confused. Is chitosan a toxin binder or a blood thinner?

Sorry for my ignorance!

Best,

--------------------
Clarissa

Because I knew you:
I have been changed for good.

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brentb
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From my experience chitosan has no effect on biofilm from a systemic perspective. I have had some progress using MMS and silver treatment. The MMS does work in industrial practices on biofilms which is the main reason I experimented with it.

For anyone interested in my protocal:
3 drops of MMS and activate with citric acid. Add the mixture to saline water and irrigate the sinuses. As it doesn't burn, you can hold the solution in the sinuses for awhile. As with C. silver I find this is has far better absorption than oral intake. Although I also use it as a mouthwash. If herx like symptoms occur the next day I irrigate with silver.

So far I've noticed my thrush (yeast) problems have disappeared and my biofilm buildup has noticeably decreased in both physical appearance and in it's symptoms (Fibro). The regiment has been anything but easy but I'm starting to believe there is in fact a way out of this hell hole.
good luck all.

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Curiouser
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I'm really not sure how effective chitosan would be for eliminating toxins other than acting as an insoluable fiber and helping to cleanse the intestinal tract.

It absorbs fat. That's one of the reasons to be careful when taking it. It'll absorb any fat-soluable nutrients along with the fat.

I've taken it for weight loss in the past. It worked fairly well for that.

If you do decide to try this, here's a little tip. Chitosan is notorious for causing anal leakage (yeah, ew. sorry, but it's true).

One way to cut down on this problem is to also take vitamin C along with the chitosan in a 3:1 ratio.

Example: if you're taking 1500mg of chitosan, take 500mg of vitamin C along with it.

Just make sure it's regular ol' vit c, not ester-C.

The vit C serves to increase the surface tension of the fat globules and stops any potential public or private embarrassments.

I'm trying to find the pages to support this, but all my links got wiped out a little while ago. Will post them when I find them.

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If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there. - Lewis Carroll

Posts: 356 | From Body-PA, Mind-elsewhere | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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