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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Knotweed (Resveratrol) - do people herx on this?

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Author Topic: Knotweed (Resveratrol) - do people herx on this?
wenan
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I started Knotweed almost 2 weeks ago and I have been going up slowly. The last few days I have had gut issues, felt pretty depressed, and that old flu-like feeling. It feels like herxing but I don't know?
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serendipity
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Wenan,
I can't help much but would be curious.
I started Teasel and Knotweed at the same time and have been herxing.

This is a strange herx. Feel jittery and want to jump out of my skin type feeling.

Curious what others will write.

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Annxyz
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The resveratrol causes intense herxing in many people.

Just my opinion, but I doubt ( from people who have Pm'ed me and their feedback ) that most folks can tolerate the resveratrol at high doses as Buhner's book suggests .

I have read other posts here of folks who had strong herx reactions to teasal.

To me , if a substance is rapidly affecting my emotions in a downward spiral, it is best to back off and take a break , then try it again
at a low dose and then go slowly .

Feeling like you are going to jump out of your skin, sounds like anxiety, which is not good .

These are simply my opinions and they may not be worth a whole lot . I think we have to listen to our bodies and go by personal instinct a lot of the time.

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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Ruth Ruth
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I am fairly sure the Knotweed has given me emotional upset symptoms. I keep rereading Buhner's section in Healing Lyme about the herb and thinking, 'but this is supposed to help with herx, not cause them!'

I am not all out depressed right now, but I went out briefly to shop last night and noticed I was really jumpy/hypersensitive when I was trying to work around the other shoppers in the grocery. Not a normal feeling at all.

It's not enough to get me to stop taking it, but it sure isn't normal life as I've known it.

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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Carol in PA
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When I got up to four capsules of Resveratrol per day, I began to have aching pain in the kidney area of my back.

I stopped it, and the pain subsided.
Three days later I tried taking one capsule of resveratrol, and it happened again.

Resveratrol is an antioxidant, and increases blood circulation in the brain.
My brain got so much more oxygen that I was able to think more clearly, hold thoughts in short term memory and analyze them.

I had forgotten that I used to be able to think this way.

I hope to be able to take Resveratrol again, but the kidney pain has me stumped.

Carol

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hardynaka
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I don't know if I can help here either. I can't tolerate lots of knotweed either. I take very very tiny doses a day, and I feel great on these tiny doses.

I guess I had an allergy to both Source Naturals brand (this for sure was an allergy) and to high amoutns of whole plant.

It does do things in the brain. Like clearing it?

As for other symptoms, I can't help as I dont' have many lyme symptoms anymore, so no herxes...

My feeling is that it's a strong herb too, like others. I feel that ramping extra slowly is recommendable.

Selma

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wenan
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what a difference all of you make. Just knowing you are out there with pearls of wisdom makes the going so much easier! Thank you. I feel much better. Out of curiosity, what is teasel for?
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serendipity
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This is a great place to learn.

Ann-I am cutting out some of the herbs. This anxiety is too much, I just left a baby shower crying for no good reason.

Wenan- According to Traditional Chinese Medicine Teasal is good for tonifying the liver and kidney, strengthening bones, healind painful knees and the lower back.

Some have also found it to be effective for killing lyme.

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JimBoB
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I haven't taken Teasel, as I don't feel I need it with all the other good herbs I take.

Yes, Hu Zhang, (Resveratrol), helps a lot for brain fog. I have absolutely NO bad reactions to it.

I only take 6 capsules a day now, but used to be up to 12 capsules a day for about 5 or 6 months.

I take the Plum Flower Brand, and am going to go to the whole herb powder soon. I have been taking the 5:1 extract for about 15 months now.

Good Stuff. Maybe something else you are eating or taking is giving you the trouble.

Jim [Cool]

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Annxyz
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I have a feeling that most of us are taking the Source Natural brand of resveratrol , which Buhner mentions in his book . I am . I am having some problems with it , as have some other folks here .

It may be very different chemically from the brand JimBob has taken.

So far I have not heard from anyone who can tolerate very much of it .

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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Ruth Ruth
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Ok, well now I know I have another option in using the herb directly instead of the source naturals product. I'm not ready to give up, but it's always nice to have a back up. [Wink]

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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Annxyz
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ruth ,
According to Buhner the whole herbs do have extra benefits that the isolates do not have .

Some of the herbs he recommends the concentrates . If I can not tolerate the concentrate , I may try the whole herb and see if it works better . I bet it would be easier to tolerate .

My concern with the resveratrol is that I have read studies ( as did another member here ) that indicate that it can act to raise progesterone levels A LOT . For many women that might not be a problem. For me it IS A PROBLEM . In some women progesterone has a good benefit for their emotions. Others find it makes them hyperemotional and have dark moods .

I think we have to remember here that ONLY GOD HIMSELF could be expert enough to develop a protocol or medicine that would never cause adverse reactions or sensitivities in SOME cases .
What works for one person may cause an adverse
reaction or complication in another .

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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MariaA
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I have been on the Source Naturals stuff and I do great on it. I did it for a couple of months while on antibiotics and am now back to doing it again for the past couple of months, after getting off of antibiotics due to side effects.

--------------------
Symptom Free!!! Thank you all!!!!

Find me at Lymefriends, I post under the same name.
diet: http://lymefriends.ning.com/group/healthylowcarbrecipes
Homemade Probiotics thread
Herbal Links Thread

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wenan
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I may look into the plum flower brand but I did not up my dose as I had planned yesterday as it felt like the symptoms were passing.

It is always a balancing act trying to decide how much herxing is good herxing. This morning I feel better so I might give myself a week to stabilize and try to go to the 4th tablet. Thanks for all your help

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Ruth Ruth
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Hey, a little update... I'm still on 2 per day of the source naturals Resveratrol and I'm doing ok now.

After reading a bit more on the forums I decided to really get serious about the detox side of this and it seems to be helping.

Just in case anyone is interested... I added in 2-3 dropperfuls of the noni, 16-20 drops of pinella, 16-24 drops of burbur spread through out the day. Also, I finally am trying out the detox food pads. And yes, they do turn brown.

I don't have much in the way of mental herxes now, but the joint problems are still an issue. In fact, my muscles seem really tight, especially around my head and my low back.

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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Annxyz
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I really hope others who are trying this will
share their updates . Thank you RUTH .

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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TerryK
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According to Buhner, resveratrol is a strong anti-bacterial and a modulator of immune response during infection (page 202). It works against bartonella. Perhaps some of you are experiencing a die off of bartonella?

Annxyz - I'm so glad you mentioned progesterone.
According to Buhner, resveratrol has a molecular structure similar to a synthetic estrogen (page 154). According to him, studies have found that it acts much like estrogen but without the bad side effects. I didn't know that it increases progesterone and this could be very important for me.

I've been on a very low dose of resveratrol. I have never been able to take progesterone due to it causing fluid retention and severe depression. I have been struggling with fluid gain again and some depression since starting the resveratrol but I thought it must be the abx. I had no idea that resveratrol causes an increase in progesterone. I'll stop taking it immediately and see if that helps my symptoms. Thanks for sharing your info.
Terry

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Ruth Ruth
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Terry, I didn't know about the bartonella killing. I will have to think about that. Aren't we supposed to go after the babasia, lyme and then bartonella? (What am I doing up so late again???)

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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Annxyz
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Ruth ,
What are noni and pinella for?

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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bpeck
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Where are you buying the reservatrol? I was under the impression there wasn't anything on the market yet that was a therapeutic dose of this antioxidant.

Barb

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TerryK
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RuthRuth:
quote:
Terry, I didn't know about the bartonella killing. I will have to think about that. Aren't we supposed to go after the babasia, lyme and then bartonella?
In the book, he says that resveratrol will inhibit NF-kB upregulation, stopping the inflammatory response that is so important for indothelial penetration by bartonella organisms. It is also an angiogenesis modulator and will stop the angiogenesis-stimulating action of the bacteria. It will strongly protect the body against the proliferation of microvascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

In the same paragraph, he states - It is as well, a strong antibacterial etc.. Not sure if this means it has a direct killing effect on bart or not. He does say above that it hinders indothelial penetration.

If you do a google search on resveratrol and bacteria you can see that it seems to have an effect on a number of bacteria. It is also an anti-fungal from the looks of it. Off hand, I didn't see any studies specific to bartonella.
Terry

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hardynaka
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Terry, I also experience a bit of fluid retention since my bart symptoms appear (hand and feet are a bit swolen). When I take knotweed, the swelling disappears (but it comes back). Also boneset helps a lot on swelling. I wonder if both are not anti-inflamatory...

I'm using knotweed to try to kill bartonella. But I can't tolerate high doses, so I don't know if this will work.

Ruth, this is general rule (killing order). Many lyme specialists say you got to go for co-infections first. Babesia is usually number 1 for most, maybe because it's so debilitating...

I guess borrelia will remain until the end, so you got to 'attack' it too while treating the other critters, at least, that's what I did (and do). I don't ramp up on borrelia killers though, I keep borrelia killers on low doses while I try to ramp on the other critter killers... It has worked until now.

Buhner doesn't recommend REsveratrol pure (if I remember well). He recommends whole knotweed herb.
Selma

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Ruth Ruth
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I am taking the source naturals brand until I run out ... staying at this low dose. But I am seriously considering going to the whole herb next. (JimBob's inspiration)

Annxyz,
quote:
What are noni and pinella for?
Towards the end of fifth post down on this thread:
quote:
Tame the beast Babesia first. Start with the PC Noni, which is a much more forgiving intracellularly working substance, an extract and concentrate of Noni, and it does not just use the Noni fruit, it uses the bark of the tree and the root of the tree. So some of the non-renewable of the plant are in there. There is a company you can read up on it (Nutramedix) that manufactures this and they sell their own Noni, their own Samento. Biopure adds their microcurrent frequencies into the Noni and into the Samento, which makes it a much more powerful remedy. Similar price, but you get a lot more from Biopure because it has all the energies loaded into it.
(Another link to Gigi's writings on Noni here.)

And Selma's experience in this thread.

I decided to add Noni/Burbur/Pinella together to see if I could get the brain clear and maybe even help with the Babesia. The brain is much clearer. Pinella has little literature, but I bought it on a hunch that the label might be right when it said it was for brain detox.

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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lalalu
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I take the Resveratrol (1 40 mg tab) before I go to bed because I do to herx from it.

--------------------
http://chroniclyme.blogspot.com/

"Illnesses, hover constantly above us, their seed blown by the winds, but they do not set in the terrain unless the terrain is ready to receive them."---Claude Bernard.

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Annxyz
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Thank you Ruth for sharing the info . Have you seen any noticeable benefit from the PC noni ?
Does it cause a herx reaction?

--------------------
ANNXYZ

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treepatrol
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Resveratrol

Summary
Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound found in grapes, red wine, purple grape juice, peanuts and some berries. (More Information)
When taken orally, resveratrol appears to be well-absorbed by humans, but its bioavailability is relatively low because it is rapidly metabolized and eliminated. (More Information)
Scientists became interested in exploring potential health benefits of resveratrol when its presence was reported in red wine, leading to speculation that resveratrol might help explain the ``French Paradox.'' (More Information)
Moderate alcohol consumption has been consistently associated with 20-30% reductions in coronary heart disease risk, but it is not yet clear whether red wine polyphenols, such as resveratrol, confer any additional risk reduction. (More Information)
Although resveratrol can inhibit the growth of cancer cells in culture and some animal models, it is not known whether high intakes of resveratrol can prevent cancer in humans. (More Information)
Resveratrol administration increased the lifespans of yeast, worms, and fruit flies, but it is not known whether resveratrol will have similar effects in higher animals or humans. (More Information)
At present, relatively little is known about the effects of resveratrol in humans.
Introduction
Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) belongs to a class of polyphenolic compounds called stilbenes (1). Some types of plants produce resveratrol and other stilbenes in response to stress, injury, fungal infection, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (2). Resveratrol is a fat-soluble compound that occurs in a trans and a cis configuration (see figure 1). Both cis- and trans-resveratrol also occur as glucosides (bound to a glucose molecule). Resveratrol-3-O-beta-glucoside is also called piceid (3). Scientists became interested in exploring potential health benefits of resveratrol in 1992 when its presence was first reported in red wine (4), leading to speculation that resveratrol might help explain the ``French Paradox'' (see Cardiovascular Disease below). More recently, reports on the potential for resveratrol to inhibit the development of cancer (5) and extend lifespan (6) in cell culture and animal models have continued to generate scientific interest.

Metabolism and Bioavailability
Although trans-resveratrol appears to be well-absorbed by humans when taken orally, its bioavailability is relatively low due to its rapid metabolism and elimination (7). When healthy men and women took an oral dose of 25 mg of trans-resveratrol, only traces of the unchanged resveratrol were detected in plasma (blood), while plasma concentrations of resveratrol metabolites peaked 30-60 minutes later at concentrations around 2 micromoles/liter (7, 8). The bioavailability of resveratrol from grape juice, which contains mostly glucosides of resveratrol (piceid) may be even lower than that of trans-resveratrol (9). Information about the bioavailability of resveratrol in humans is important because much of the basic research on resveratrol has been conducted in cultured cells exposed to unmetabolized resveratrol at concentrations that are often 10-100 times greater than peak concentrations observed in human plasma after oral consumption (10). Although cells that line the digestive tract are exposed to unmetabolized resveratrol, research in humans suggests that other tissues are exposed primarily to resveratrol metabolites. Little is known about the biological activity of resveratrol metabolites, and it is not known whether some tissues are capable of converting resveratrol metabolites back to resveratrol (7).
Biological Activities
Direct Antioxidant Activity
In the test tube, resveratrol effectively scavenges (neutralizes) free radicals and other oxidants (11) and inhibits low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation (12, 13). However, there is little evidence that resveratrol is an important antioxidant in vivo (14). After oral consumption of resveratrol, circulating and intracellular levels of resveratrol in humans are likely to be much lower than that of other important antioxidants, such as vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of resveratrol metabolites, which comprise most of the circulating resveratrol, may be lower than that of resveratrol.

Estrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activities
Endogenous estrogens are steroid hormones synthesized by humans and other mammals that bind to estrogen receptors within cells. The estrogen-receptor complex interacts with unique sequences in DNA to modulate the expression of estrogen-responsive genes (15). A compound that binds to estrogen receptors and elicits similar responses to endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen agonist, while a compound that binds estrogen receptors but prevents or inhibits the response elicited by endogenous estrogens is considered an estrogen antagonist. The chemical structure of resveratrol is very similar to that of the synthetic estrogen agonist, diethylstilbestrol (see figure 2), suggesting that resveratrol might also function as an estrogen agonist. However, in cell culture experiments resveratrol acts as an estrogen agonist under some conditions, and an estrogen antagonist under other conditions (16, 17). In estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells, resveratrol acted as an estrogen agonist in the absence of the endogenous estrogen, 17beta-estradiol, but acted as an estrogen antagonist in the presence of 17beta-estradiol (18, 19). At present, it appears that resveratrol has the potential to act as an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on such factors as cell type, estrogen receptor isoform (ER alpha or ER beta), and the presence of endogenous estrogens (15).
Biological Activities Related to Cancer Prevention
Effects on Biotransformation Enzymes
Some compounds are not carcinogenic until they have been metabolized in the body by cytochrome P450 enzymes (2). By inhibiting the expression and activity of certain cytochrome P450 enzymes (20, 21), resveratrol could help prevent cancer by decreasing exposure to these activated carcinogens. In contrast, increasing the activity of phase II biotransformation enzymes generally promotes the excretion of potentially toxic or carcinogenic chemicals. Resveratrol has been found to increase the expression and activity of the phase II enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone reductase in cultured cells (5, 22).
Preservation of Normal Cell Cycle Regulation
Following DNA damage, the cell cycle can be transiently arrested to allow for DNA repair or activation of pathways leading to cell death (apoptosis) if the damage is irreparable (23). Defective cell cycle regulation may result in the propagation of mutations that contribute to the development of cancer. Resveratrol has been found to induce cell cycle arrest when added to cancer cells grown in culture (24).
Inhibition of Proliferation and Induction of Apoptosis
Unlike normal cells, cancer cells proliferate rapidly and lose the ability to respond to cell death signals by undergoing apoptosis. Resveratrol has been found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in a number of cancer cell lines [reviewed in (2)].

Inhibition of Tumor Invasion and Angiogenesis
Cancerous cells invade normal tissue aided by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases. Resveratrol has been found to inhibit the activity of at least one type of matrix metalloproteinase (25). Invasive tumors must also develop new blood vessels to fuel their rapid growth by a process known as angiogenesis. Resveratrol has been found to inhibit angiogenesis in vitro (26, 27).
Anti-inflammatory Effects
Inflammation promotes cellular proliferation and angiogenesis and inhibits apoptosis (28). Resveratrol has been found to inhibit the activity of several inflammatory enzymes in vitro, including cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase (29, 30).
Biological Activities Related to Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
Inhibition of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule Expression
Atherosclerosis is now recognized as an inflammatory disease, and several measures of inflammation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack) (31). One of the earliest events in the development of atherosclerosis is the recruitment of inflammatory white blood cells from the blood to the artery wall by vascular cell adhesion molecules (32). Resveratrol has been found to inhibit the expression of adhesion molecules in cultured endothelial cells (33, 34).
Inhibition of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation
The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells plays an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis (35). Resveratrol has been found to inhibit the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in culture (36, 37).
Stimulation of Endolethelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activity
eNOS is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) by vascular endothelial cells. NO is needed to maintain arterial relaxation (vasodilation), and impaired NO-dependent vasodilation is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (38). Resveratrol has been found to stimulate eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (39, 40).
Inhibition of Platelet Aggregation
Platelet aggregation is one of the first steps in the formation of a blood clot that can occlude a coronary or cerebral artery, resulting in myocardial infarction or stroke. Resveratrol has been found to platelet aggregation in vitro (41, 42).
Note: It is important to keep in mind that that many of the biological activities discussed above were observed in cells cultured in the presence of resveratrol at higher concentrations than are likely to be achieved in humans consuming resveratrol orally (see Metabolism and Bioavailability above).
Disease Prevention
Cardiovascular Disease
Red Wine Polyphenols
Significant reductions in cardiovascular disease risk have been associated with moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages (43). The ``French Paradox''--the observation that mortality from coronary heart disease is relatively low in France despite relatively high levels of dietary saturated fat and cigarette smoking--led to the idea that the regular consumption of red wine might provide additional protection from cardiovascular disease (44, 45). Red wine contains resveratrol and even higher levels of flavonoids. These polyphenolic compounds have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other potentially anti-atherogenic effects in the test tube and in some animal models of atherosclerosis (46). However, it is not yet known whether increased consumption of polyphenols from red wine provides any additional protection from cardiovascular disease beyond that associated with its alcohol content. The results of epidemiological studies addressing this question have been inconsistent. While some large prospective studies found that wine drinkers were at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than beer or liquor drinkers (47-49), others found no difference (50-52). Socioeconomic and lifestyle differences between people who prefer wine and those who prefer beer or liquor may explain part of the additional benefit observed in some studies. Several studies have found that people who prefer wine tend to have higher incomes, more education, smoke less, and eat more fruits and vegetables and less saturated fat than people who prefer other alcoholic beverages (53-55). Although moderate alcohol consumption has been consistently associated with 20-30% reductions in coronary heart disease risk, it is not yet clear whether red wine polyphenols confer any additional risk reduction.
Resveratrol
Resveratrol has been found to exert a number of potentially cardioprotective effects in vitro, including the inhibition of platelet aggregation (41, 42, 56), promotion of vasodilation by enhancing the production of NO (40, 57) and inhibition of inflammatory enzymes (30, 58, 59). However, the concentrations of resveratrol required to produce these effects are often higher than those that have been measured in human plasma after oral consumption of resveratrol (7). The results of some animal studies suggest that high oral doses of resveratrol could decrease the risk of thrombosis (clot formation) and atherosclerosis (60, 61), but at least one study found increased atherosclerosis in animals fed resveratrol (62). Although its presence in red wine has stimulated a great deal of interest in the potential for resveratrol to prevent cardiovascular disease, there is currently no convincing evidence that resveratrol has cardioprotective effects in humans, particularly in the amounts present in 1-2 glasses of red wine (see Sources).
Cancer
When added to cells cultured outside the body, resveratrol has been found to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of human cancer cell lines, including those from breast, prostate, stomach, colon, pancreatic and thyroid cancers (2). In animal models, oral administration of resveratrol inhibited the development of esophageal (63), intestinal (64), and mammary (breast) cancer (18, 65) induced by chemical carcinogens. However, oral resveratrol was not effective in inhibiting the development of lung cancer induced by cigarette smoke carcinogens (66, 67), and the effects of oral resveratrol administration on mice that are genetically predisposed to colon cancer have been mixed (68, 69). It is not known whether high intakes of resveratrol can help prevent cancer in humans. Studies on human metabolism of resveratrol suggest that even very high dietary intakes of resveratrol may not result in tissue levels that are high enough to realize most of the protective effects demonstrated in cell culture studies (7, 10).
Longevity
Caloric restriction is known to extend the lifespans of a number of species, including mammals (70). In yeast, caloric restriction stimulates the activity of an enzyme known as Sir2 (71). Providing resveratrol to yeast increased Sir2 activity in the absence of caloric restriction and extended the replicative lifespan of yeast by 70% (6). Resveratrol feeding also extended the lifespans of worms (C. elegans) and fruit flies (D. melanogaster) by a similar mechanism (72), but it is not known whether resveratrol will have similar effects in higher animals. Although resveratrol increased the activity of the homologous human enzyme (Sirt1) in the test tube (6), it is not known whether resveratrol can extend the human lifespan. Moreover, the resveratrol concentrations required to increase human Sirt1 activity were considerably higher than concentrations that have been measured in human plasma after oral consumption.
Sources
Food Sources
Resveratrol is found in grapes, wine, grape juice, peanuts, and berries of Vaccinum species, including blueberries, bilberries, and cranberries (73-75). In grapes, resveratrol is found only in the skins (76). The amount of resveratrol in grape skins varies with the grape cultivar, its geographic origin, and exposure to fungal infection (77). The amount of fermentation time a wine spends in contact with grape skins is an important determinant of its resveratrol content. Consequently, white and ros wines generally contain less resveratrol than red wines (4). Red or purple grape juices may also be good sources of resveratrol (3). The predominant form of resveratrol in grapes and grape juice is trans-resveratrol glucoside (trans-piceid), but wines also contain significant amounts of resveratrol aglycones, thought to be the result of sugar cleavage during fermentation (73). Many wines also contain significant amounts of cis-resveratrol (figure 1), which may also be produced during fermentation or released from viniferins (resveratrol polymers) (78). Red wine is a relatively rich source of resveratrol, but other polyphenols are present in red wine at considerably higher concentrations than resveratrol (see the separate article on flavonoids) (79). The total resveratrol content of some beverages and foods are listed in the tables below. These values should be considered approximate since the resveratrol content of foods and beverages can vary considerably.


Supplements
Most resveratrol supplements available in the U.S. contain extracts of the root of Polygonum cuspidatum, also known as Hu Zhang or kojo-kon (80). Red wine extracts and red grape extracts containing resveratrol and other polyphenols are also available in the U.S. as dietary supplements. Resveratrol supplements may contain anywhere from 10-50 mg of resveratrol, but the effective doses for chronic disease prevention in humans are not known.
Safety
Adverse Effects
Resveratrol is not known to be toxic or cause adverse effects in humans, but there have been few controlled clinical trials. In rats, daily oral administration of trans-resveratrol at doses up to 300 mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks resulted in no apparent adverse effects (81, 82).
Pregnancy and Lactation
The safety of resveratrol-containing supplements during pregnancy and lactation has not been established (80). Since no safe level of alcohol consumption has been established at any stage of pregnancy (83), pregnant women should avoid consuming wine as a source of resveratrol.
Estrogen-sensitive Cancers
Until more is known about the estrogenic activity of resveratrol in humans, women with a history of estrogen-sensitive cancers, such as breast, ovarian and uterine cancers, should avoid resveratrol supplements (see Estrogenic and Anti-estrogenic Activities above).


Drug Interactions
Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Drugs
Resveratrol has been found to inhibit human platelet aggregation in vitro (42, 84). Theoretically, high intakes of resveratrol (e.g., from supplements) could increase the risk of bleeding when taken with anticoagulant drugs, such as warfarin (Coumadin), and antiplatelet drugs, such as clopidogrel (Plavix), dipyridamole (Persantine), non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and others.


Drugs Metabolized by Cytochrome P450 3A4
Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit the activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) in vitro (85, 86). Although this interaction has not been reported in humans, high intakes of resveratrol (e.g., from supplements) could theoretically increase the bioavailability and the risk of toxicity of drugs that undergo extensive first-pass metabolism by CYP3A4. Drugs known to be metabolized by CYP3A4 include but are not limited to HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (atorvastatin, lovastatin and simvastatin), calcium channel antagonists (felodipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, nisoldipine, nitrendipine, nimodipine and verapamil), anti-arrhythmic agents (amiodarone), HIV protease inhibitors (saquinivir), immunosuppressants (cyclosporine and tacrolimus), antihistamines (terfenadine), benzodiazepines (midazolam and triazolam), and drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction (sildenafil).

References

Written by:
Jane Higdon, Ph.D.
Linus Pauling Institute
Oregon State University
Reviewed by:
William P. Steward, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Oncology
Co-Director of Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group
Department of Oncology
University of Leicester


Link:

LinusPauling

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

Newbie Links

Posts: 10564 | From PA Where the Creeks are Red | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ruth Ruth
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Hello tree,

That post is so looooong and it kind of breaks up the conversation.

I hope you don't mind if I make a little suggestion... how about if you could edit it to just have a small quote of the significant part and a link to the source?

I know it's nice to have the whole text... but it would be so nice to be able to scroll through the conversation with out the such a long post breaking up the flow.

Thanks for understanding that I value your input, just struggling with the way it hits me mentally. [dizzy]

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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TerryK
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hardynaka - sorry you have the fluid problem too. Thanks for the info. When I'm able to take herbs again, I'll try them. Inflammation does seem to be part of the picture for me but I don't know if the herbs you mention are anti-inflammatory. I take quite a few anti-inflammatory supplements but they don't seem to help with the fluid retention.
Terry

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mag
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Hi

I started on the resvatrol (instead of wine -- that would be tastier)
can only take two caps a day

this is an interesting synopsis on buhners protocol - note -
it cross the Blood Brain barrier
http://www.hwfc.com/CoopScoop/Dec05/sales2article.html

I believe the stephania root and boneset are good for the bart.

I sleep better when i take the boneset

mags

mags

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Ruth Ruth
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Annxyz,

I have not used the PC Noni, only the base Noni extract that they start from. The literature states that it is adaptogenic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and so on.

I have only been using it in 'therapeutic' quantities for the past week or so. This is after restarting my herbal decoction with all the other herbals.

I know that I was struggling with neuro symptoms before starting the noni. Now those are much better and I seem to have another set of symptoms. Bladder irritation (see other thread).

Maybe Gigi's recent post here about mercury toxins getting stuck in the kidneys should give me pause as well.
quote:
Once the kidney is full with mercury, it cannot excrete the mercury. It doesn't sit in the excretory part of the kidney cells, It sits in parts of the nephron that is incapable of detoxing itself.
Annxyz, if you stick with the Buhner protocol, it seems that you should be able to cover all the bases with his recommendations. So, my thought is to wait on adding another product (such as noni) until you feel like you have got all the benefit you can get from what you are doing.

Everyone is different and we've read the comments about some kicking Babesia with salt/C and other with the noni. Everyone knows their own body best. I do terrific with liquid herbal preparations, especially teas & tinctures. JimBob responds great to the whole herb in capsule form. I think there is room for personal variations.

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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JimBoB
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To WHOM it May Concern:

IF my memory serves me right, Buhner recommends to get the Resveratol from Knotweed Root only, not grapes. But it has been quite awhile since I read that, so maybe I need to go back and reread the book again. I do know I pick up new things everytime I do.

I am still on Plum Flower Brand 5:1 Hu Zhang extract. But I am winding down on that. And have the WHOLE HERB in bulk and will be encapsulating it soon.

I cut way down to only 2 capsules, 2 times a day this past weekend,of ALL my herbs, except for Devils Claw and Sarsaparilla, which I am down to 3, two times a day. And kept Nettle and Milk Thistle at 1, two times a day.

BUT I have been tired lately, can't sleep well, some memory issues, some pain in my left knee tendons, some pain/stiffness in the back of my neck, etc.. SOME of that could be our very uncomfortable mattress. The worst I have slept on in years and have been on it for almost a year now. I haven't worked on our Master bedroom so we are sleeping in the spare bedroom.

I am considering stopping all herbs for maybe a week or so, then restarting back at the very minimum and see what happens. Also, I MAY HAVE to stop for awhile as my Illeostomy Stoma broke almost all the way loose yesterday, and I didn't know WHAT the pain was from, but found it out this afternoon when I changed my appliance.

Sooooooooo, that means more surgery for that. I need to call someone and see HOW critical it is, and HOW SOON I should go to hospital. I don't want to go at all, but NOW I feel it is inevitable for sure. [Frown]

Well, got to go, haven't done hardly anything this week. So tired and listless with 4 hours or less of sleep a night. And i NEED to get at things soon, though IF I have the surgery that takes care of that for a few months.

Take care,
Jim.
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mag
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jim bob

sorry to hear about you stoma thats no fun

hope you get an answer soon from your doc

if you have surgery - that means no herbs for awhile


will pray that goes easy for you


mags

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Ruth Ruth
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JimBob, Take care of yourself!!!

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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JimBoB
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Thanks, gals.

I haven't called the doc yet. I guess I am just stalling the inevitable, but I hate to think of the surgery.

I had two of them back in '94, and was in the hospital for 13 days the first time, (July), and should have been in longer as I had a bad relapse when they sent me home. But I didn't have any insurance, so they didn't want to keep me around.
Then, because I was so weak from blood loss, they did my second surgery in November of that year to finish. I was stronger, so only had to stay in for 9 days that time. Still BOTH were very, very painful, and I don't like taking the pain drugs any more than I absolutely HAVE to, so therefore suffer even more. They are VERY addicting.
This was over 12 years ago, but still pretty strong in my memory, even with Lyme. Got to get myself going to pick up that phone and call, I guess.
Yes, will have to be off herbs for awhile. That was in the back of my mind when I said I was going to go off for a week or so, and will try to time it so it works out for everything. Sure don't want to go off the herbs though.
Jim [Cool]

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hardynaka
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Jim, so sorry you're passing bad days.. I guess you have to call the ducks. Better not to delay something that could be serious...

Wishing you the best of luck with whatever happens (operation??).

Take care!
Selma

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JimBoB
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Hi Selma:
Yes, no fun. I have held off though, calling my duck. He isn't much help anyway, so will wait it out the weekend.

The stronger pain has subsided, and I have been taking it pretty easy, no heavy lifting etc., trying to keep it from tearing the rest of the way. No guarantees that a new surgery will be any better either.

I need to lose about 40 pounds too, that would help, I think. All the fat on the belly doesn't give it anything to really adhere to.

I will see how it is by Monday and decide what to do then.

Jim.
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Ruth Ruth
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JimBob,

That's why you are going to cut back on the herbs? ... so you can lose wieght? [Smile]

I am asking for a special delivery miracle for you today!

--------------------
When I lost my grip on Faith in the maze of illness,
Hope gently clasped my hand and led on.

RuthRuth

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clairenotes
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Please add 'headaches' to the list of herx reactions to reservatrol. Not overwhelming arteminisin-like headaches, but significant, nontheless. Have taken three so far today.

Sorry you are facing a surgery, Jimbob. Hope all goes as well as possible.

Claire

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